portably encrypting a file system's partition, directory and/or file

Discussion in 'Computer Security' started by news, Nov 25, 2005.

  1. news

    news Guest

    Hi *,

    I have firewire and USB devices with partitions/logical drives, whole
    directories and/or files I would like to encrypt. The thing is that I
    need to be able to just plug in the thing on any x86 machine running a
    commercial OS that would just take it (and AFAIK the only filesystem
    that even a MAC would seamlessly 'mount' is vfat/FAT32)

    is there anyway to do that?

    I have read quite a bit about it and I still don't find exactly what I
    need.

    Also, why exactly does encryption belong in the kernel? I think once
    you make it a kernel-depending functionality 'portability' to other OS
    goes out the window

    Are there libraries out there (of course, preferably OSS ones) which
    you could compile for different OS and have access to pluggable
    devices?

    I crossposted this message becuase, to me, these portability and security
    issues naturally reach out into different subject areas

    Also, google was a little 'temperamental' when I was trying to post this
    message

    thanx
    otf
     
    news, Nov 25, 2005
    #1
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  2. news

    Guest

    In alt.computer.security news <> wrote:
    > Hi *,
    >
    > I have firewire and USB devices with partitions/logical drives, whole
    > directories and/or files I would like to encrypt. The thing is that I
    > need to be able to just plug in the thing on any x86 machine running a
    > commercial OS that would just take it (and AFAIK the only filesystem
    > that even a MAC would seamlessly 'mount' is vfat/FAT32)
    >
    > is there anyway to do that?
    >
    > I have read quite a bit about it and I still don't find exactly what I
    > need.
    >
    > Also, why exactly does encryption belong in the kernel? I think once
    > you make it a kernel-depending functionality 'portability' to other OS
    > goes out the window
    >
    > Are there libraries out there (of course, preferably OSS ones) which
    > you could compile for different OS and have access to pluggable
    > devices?
    >
    > I crossposted this message becuase, to me, these portability and security
    > issues naturally reach out into different subject areas
    >
    > Also, google was a little 'temperamental' when I was trying to post this
    > message
    >
    > thanx
    > otf


    Obviously, if you're looking at encrypted filesystems the encryption
    should be in the filesystem layer, which is part of the kernel on pretty
    much every mainstream OS out there.

    There are many ways to do this, and quite a few that actually work, and
    since only a few people use encrypted filesystems on different hosts,
    there's little reason for standardization.

    I'd recommend you to use an OpenPGP application (GnuPG?) and some
    portable archiving format. Be sure to scrub whatever disk you worked on
    when done.

    Joachim
     
    , Nov 25, 2005
    #2
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