Poles in a Sea of R-G-B

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Robert Spanjaard, Jun 20, 2010.

  1. Robert Spanjaard, Jun 20, 2010
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Robert Spanjaard

    Mark L Guest

    On Sun, 20 Jun 2010 19:01:56 +0200, Robert Spanjaard <>
    wrote:

    >Three exposures. One for red, one for green, and one for blue.
    >
    >http://www.arumes.com/temp/CRW_5767-69.jpg


    This was a fun gimmick back in the 70's, done by dropping a long
    rectangular "shutter" card with 3 filters in it, dropped in a slot in front
    of the lens. (Carnival-ride and moving traffic lights at night and
    water-wave shots being the most popular subjects for this technique.) All
    three colors of course being recorded on one frame when done this way.
    Anything moving in the scene would get their share of individual color
    exposures.

    Those of you who might happen to have some burst sequences laying around
    might play with this in an editor. Just split each image to its RGB layers
    then recombine one of each from individual shots that are spaced moments
    apart.
    Mark L, Jun 20, 2010
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Robert Spanjaard

    sobriquet Guest

    On 20 jun, 19:01, Robert Spanjaard <> wrote:
    > Three exposures. One for red, one for green, and one for blue.
    >
    > http://www.arumes.com/temp/CRW_5767-69.jpg
    >
    > --
    > Regards, Robert                                      http://www.arumes.com


    What's the point? If you enjoy gaudy colors, such effects are much
    easier to accomplish in photoshop with some simple manipulations that
    would allow more control over the variations in color.
    sobriquet, Jun 20, 2010
    #3
  4. On Sun, 20 Jun 2010 13:03:28 -0500, Mark L wrote:

    > On Sun, 20 Jun 2010 19:01:56 +0200, Robert Spanjaard
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>Three exposures. One for red, one for green, and one for blue.
    >>
    >>http://www.arumes.com/temp/CRW_5767-69.jpg

    >
    > This was a fun gimmick back in the 70's, done by dropping a long
    > rectangular "shutter" card with 3 filters in it, dropped in a slot in
    > front of the lens. (Carnival-ride and moving traffic lights at night and
    > water-wave shots being the most popular subjects for this technique.)
    > All three colors of course being recorded on one frame when done this
    > way. Anything moving in the scene would get their share of individual
    > color exposures.
    >
    > Those of you who might happen to have some burst sequences laying around
    > might play with this in an editor. Just split each image to its RGB
    > layers then recombine one of each from individual shots that are spaced
    > moments apart.


    In fact, long before turning into a gimmick, it was one of the first
    techniques used for full color photography.



    --
    Regards, Robert http://www.arumes.com
    Robert Spanjaard, Jun 20, 2010
    #4
  5. Robert Spanjaard

    Mark L Guest

    On Sun, 20 Jun 2010 20:14:34 +0200, Robert Spanjaard <>
    wrote:

    >On Sun, 20 Jun 2010 13:03:28 -0500, Mark L wrote:
    >
    >> On Sun, 20 Jun 2010 19:01:56 +0200, Robert Spanjaard
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>>Three exposures. One for red, one for green, and one for blue.
    >>>
    >>>http://www.arumes.com/temp/CRW_5767-69.jpg

    >>
    >> This was a fun gimmick back in the 70's, done by dropping a long
    >> rectangular "shutter" card with 3 filters in it, dropped in a slot in
    >> front of the lens. (Carnival-ride and moving traffic lights at night and
    >> water-wave shots being the most popular subjects for this technique.)
    >> All three colors of course being recorded on one frame when done this
    >> way. Anything moving in the scene would get their share of individual
    >> color exposures.
    >>
    >> Those of you who might happen to have some burst sequences laying around
    >> might play with this in an editor. Just split each image to its RGB
    >> layers then recombine one of each from individual shots that are spaced
    >> moments apart.

    >
    >In fact, long before turning into a gimmick, it was one of the first
    >techniques used for full color photography.


    Yes, but done on 3 separate B&W frames.

    Here's a fun freeware tool to make the above-mentioned process a little
    easier.

    http://www.mediachance.com/digicam/rgblights.htm

    I couldn't find any of their old freebies on MediaChance's new website, but
    luckily this old link from my bookmarks still worked. See this page for
    more of their handy free tools before it disappears.
    http://www.mediachance.com/digicam/index.html

    I highly recommend the free Blackframe and FilterSIM tools. Their free
    FilterSim tool once recovered an old and badly color-shifted image someone
    wanted me to restore for them, that no amount of color-balancing in other
    editors could accomplish. Their other freebies also have their occasional
    uses.

    Their PhotoBrush, DCE AutoEnhance, and Dynamic Photo HDR programs shouldn't
    be discounted either. Their Dynamic Photo HDR is far better than the
    usually recommend Photomatix.
    Mark L, Jun 20, 2010
    #5
  6. On Sun, 20 Jun 2010 14:09:00 -0500, Mark L wrote:

    > On Sun, 20 Jun 2010 20:14:34 +0200, Robert Spanjaard
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>On Sun, 20 Jun 2010 13:03:28 -0500, Mark L wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Sun, 20 Jun 2010 19:01:56 +0200, Robert Spanjaard
    >>> <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>Three exposures. One for red, one for green, and one for blue.
    >>>>
    >>>>http://www.arumes.com/temp/CRW_5767-69.jpg
    >>>
    >>> This was a fun gimmick back in the 70's, done by dropping a long
    >>> rectangular "shutter" card with 3 filters in it, dropped in a slot in
    >>> front of the lens. (Carnival-ride and moving traffic lights at night
    >>> and water-wave shots being the most popular subjects for this
    >>> technique.) All three colors of course being recorded on one frame
    >>> when done this way. Anything moving in the scene would get their share
    >>> of individual color exposures.
    >>>
    >>> Those of you who might happen to have some burst sequences laying
    >>> around might play with this in an editor. Just split each image to its
    >>> RGB layers then recombine one of each from individual shots that are
    >>> spaced moments apart.

    >>
    >>In fact, long before turning into a gimmick, it was one of the first
    >>techniques used for full color photography.

    >
    > Yes, but done on 3 separate B&W frames.
    >
    > Here's a fun freeware tool to make the above-mentioned process a little
    > easier.
    >
    > http://www.mediachance.com/digicam/rgblights.htm
    >
    > I couldn't find any of their old freebies on MediaChance's new website,
    > but luckily this old link from my bookmarks still worked. See this page
    > for more of their handy free tools before it disappears.
    > http://www.mediachance.com/digicam/index.html


    Doing this in GIMP is already easy enough, using the Channel Mixer and
    three layers set to Addition.

    > Their PhotoBrush, DCE AutoEnhance, and Dynamic Photo HDR programs
    > shouldn't be discounted either. Their Dynamic Photo HDR is far better
    > than the usually recommend Photomatix.


    I don't do a lot of HDR, but until now qtpfsgui (called Luminance
    nowadays) does the job quite well too.
    http://qtpfsgui.sourceforge.net/
    http://www.arumes.com/photo/main.php?g2_itemId=18
    http://www.arumes.com/photo/main.php?g2_itemId=91


    --
    Regards, Robert http://www.arumes.com
    Robert Spanjaard, Jun 20, 2010
    #6
  7. Robert Spanjaard

    DanP Guest

    DanP, Jun 21, 2010
    #7
  8. Robert Spanjaard

    Rich Guest

    On Jun 20, 1:01 pm, Robert Spanjaard <> wrote:
    > Three exposures. One for red, one for green, and one for blue.
    >
    > http://www.arumes.com/temp/CRW_5767-69.jpg
    >
    > --
    > Regards, Robert                                      http://www.arumes.com


    I don't hate it as much as most current HDR stuff.
    Rich, Jun 22, 2010
    #8
  9. Robert Spanjaard, Jun 25, 2010
    #9
  10. On Fri, 25 Jun 2010 15:27:55 -0400, Neil Harrington wrote:

    > "Robert Spanjaard" <> wrote in message
    > news:d80b9$4c1e4984$546ac3cf$...
    >> Three exposures. One for red, one for green, and one for blue.
    >>
    >> http://www.arumes.com/temp/CRW_5767-69.jpg

    >
    > Very interesting. Reminds me that I've been meaning to play with just
    > that sort of thing for a long time but never got around to doing it.
    > Moving clouds I think are the most common subject for that; your photo
    > is the first time I've seen it applied to the sea.


    It's the second time I applied it to the sea. But the first attempt (with
    long exposures and B/W images) worked a lot better. I posted this image
    about four monts ago:

    http://www.arumes.com/temp/CRW_4874-76.jpg

    --
    Regards, Robert http://www.arumes.com
    Robert Spanjaard, Jun 25, 2010
    #10
  11. On Fri, 25 Jun 2010 15:27:55 -0400, Neil Harrington wrote:

    > "Robert Spanjaard" <> wrote in message
    > news:d80b9$4c1e4984$546ac3cf$...
    >> Three exposures. One for red, one for green, and one for blue.
    >>
    >> http://www.arumes.com/temp/CRW_5767-69.jpg

    >
    > Very interesting. Reminds me that I've been meaning to play with just
    > that sort of thing for a long time but never got around to doing it.
    > Moving clouds I think are the most common subject for that; your photo
    > is the first time I've seen it applied to the sea.


    I've posted similar shots before, like the one below. I think the effect
    works a lot better with long exposures, and in this case, the usage of
    B&W source images worked well too.

    http://www.arumes.com/temp/CRW_4874-76.jpg




    --
    Regards, Robert http://www.arumes.com
    Robert Spanjaard, Jun 27, 2010
    #11
  12. Robert Spanjaard, Jun 27, 2010
    #12
  13. On Mon, 28 Jun 2010 10:00:52 -0400, Neil Harrington wrote:

    >>> Very interesting. Reminds me that I've been meaning to play with just
    >>> that sort of thing for a long time but never got around to doing it.
    >>> Moving clouds I think are the most common subject for that; your photo
    >>> is the first time I've seen it applied to the sea.

    >>
    >> It's the second time I applied it to the sea. But the first attempt
    >> (with long exposures and B/W images) worked a lot better. I posted this
    >> image about four monts ago:
    >>
    >> http://www.arumes.com/temp/CRW_4874-76.jpg

    >
    > Yes, the use of B&W is very interesting -- that would never have
    > occurred to me. How did you do that?


    Take three shots, convert them to B&W, and then use one exposure for red,
    one for green, and one for blue. So the only difference is that you
    convert them to B&W before filtering.

    --
    Regards, Robert http://www.arumes.com
    Robert Spanjaard, Jun 28, 2010
    #13
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Dan
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    2,204
    Jason O'Rourke
    Nov 25, 2003
  2. Dan
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    2,574
    Jason O'Rourke
    Dec 9, 2003
  3. bwphototwo

    Sea & Sea YS-90 Auto

    bwphototwo, Dec 9, 2003, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    482
    bwphototwo
    Dec 9, 2003
  4. Reef Fish
    Replies:
    10
    Views:
    666
    Reef Fish
    May 4, 2004
  5. AM
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    543
Loading...

Share This Page