polarizing filters

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Kancil Killer, Sep 8, 2003.

  1. Hi all,
    I am very new to photography, and I am using Sony DSC-F717.

    I was interested in buying a polarizing filter for my DSC. I was in a
    shop yesterday about to purchase one (Hoya brand). The shop keep two
    types: - PL Polarizing and - CIS Polarizing. I am rather confused, as both
    description written at the back is about the same, however, the price is
    rather having great different PL: MYR80 (about US$20) and CIS: MYR120 (about
    US$30).

    I try both, see through my naked eye, both about the same, except CIS
    looks a bit darker compare to PL.

    I am interested to know what's the different between both? why such a
    great price different if both is about the same? and both are by Hoya.

    THanks
    Kancil Killer, Sep 8, 2003
    #1
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  2. Kancil Killer

    Mike Graham Guest

    In article <3f5bf9e1$>, Kancil Killer wrote:

    > I try both, see through my naked eye, both about the same, except CIS
    > looks a bit darker compare to PL.
    >
    > I am interested to know what's the different between both? why such a
    > great price different if both is about the same? and both are by Hoya.


    There is currently a thread ongoing on this group called "Polarising
    filters" which answers this question. Thoroughly.
    Bottom line - just buy the CIS one and you won't have to worry about the
    possibility of it not working properly with your camera.


    --
    =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
    Mike Graham | Metalworker, rustic, part-time zealot.
    mike 'at' metalmangler.com |
    <http://www.metalmangler.com>| Caledon, Ontario, Canada

    Lousy photographer with a really nice camera - Olympus C3020Zoom.
    <http://www.metalmangler.com/photos/photos.htm>
    Mike Graham, Sep 8, 2003
    #2
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  3. Kancil Killer

    Max Burke Guest

    > Mike Graham scribbled:
    > In article <3f5bf9e1$>, Kancil Killer wrote:


    >> I try both, see through my naked eye, both about the same, except
    >> CIS looks a bit darker compare to PL.


    >> I am interested to know what's the different between both? why
    >> such a great price different if both is about the same? and both
    >> are by Hoya.


    > There is currently a thread ongoing on this group called "Polarising
    > filters" which answers this question. Thoroughly.
    > Bottom line - just buy the CIS one and you won't have to worry
    > about the possibility of it not working properly with your camera.


    Linear polarisers work as they're supposed to with the Sony DSC F717.
    They dont stop the camera focusing or interfere with the camera's laser
    or nightshot focusing.....
    IMO they work better that the circular polariser as they give a more
    even polarising effect than circular polarisers, and better control of
    reflections.
    I use both on my '717 and FD91, and my preference is nearly always to
    use the linear polariser over the circular polariser....


    --
    mlvburke@#%&*.net.nz
    Replace the obvious with paradise to email me.
    See Found Images at:
    http://homepages.paradise.net.nz/~mlvburke
    Max Burke, Sep 8, 2003
    #3
  4. Kancil Killer

    Bob Salomon Guest

    In article <VdZ6b.5724$>,
    "Max Burke" <mlvburke@%$%#@.nz> wrote:

    > IMO they work better that the circular polariser as they give a more
    > even polarising effect than circular polarisers, and better control of
    > reflections.


    Assuming you are using a circular and a linear from the same company and
    of the same quality you will simply not see a difference. They both use
    the same polarising foil. All that is different is that a 1/4 wave plate
    is added behind the foil of the circular one.

    --
    HP Marketing Corp.
    Bob Salomon, Sep 8, 2003
    #4
  5. Kancil Killer

    Max Burke Guest

    > Bob Salomon scribbled:
    > In article <VdZ6b.5724$>,
    > "Max Burke" <mlvburke@%$%#@.nz> wrote:


    >> IMO they work better that the circular polariser as they give a more
    >> even polarising effect than circular polarisers, and better control
    >> of reflections.


    > Assuming you are using a circular and a linear from the same company
    > and of the same quality you will simply not see a difference. They
    > both use the same polarising foil. All that is different is that a
    > 1/4 wave plate is added behind the foil of the circular one.



    You would think so, but often the circular polariser appears to create a
    circular 'spot/area' of darker blue in photographs of the sky, but the
    linear polariser creates the expected even graduation of lighter to
    darker blue across the whole sky. This happens on my '717, my FD91, and
    it also used to happen when I was using film in a manual SLR.....
    Also I find that linear polarisers give finer control over reflections
    (to enhance or reduce them) than circular polarisers do.
    But I do use both types because they do behave differently.....

    --
    mlvburke@#%&*.net.nz
    Replace the obvious with paradise to email me.
    See Found Images at:
    http://homepages.paradise.net.nz/~mlvburke
    Max Burke, Sep 8, 2003
    #5
  6. Kancil Killer

    jam Guest

    Circular polarizers use more materials and are more expensive to
    construct than linears.

    A linear will work with your Sony, but the more expensive circular
    =might= also work your next camera--provided the size fits. If you're
    not concerned about the next camera, the linear's fine, but...

    I'd go with the polarizer that does the better job, within budget. Try
    this test at the store. Find a smooth non-metallic counter top with a
    good reflection coming off it--the light source doesn't matter. View
    the reflection at about 35° above the reflecting surface (Brewster's
    angle) and rotate the polarizer ring (male threads =toward= you) until
    you maximally block the reflection. Compare the two and buy the one
    that blocks better. Whether that turns out to be the linear or the
    circular, only testing will tell. If you can't tell a difference, I'd
    favor the linear.

    BTW, you can also use this test to mark the blocking direction on an
    unmarked polarizer. The blocking direction will always parallel the
    reflecting surface at the point of reflection.

    www.cliffshade.com/dpfwiw/polarizer.htm

    --
    Jeremy McCreary
    Denver, CO
    www.cliffshade.com/dpfwiw/
    -------------------------------------------
    jam, Sep 9, 2003
    #6
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