Please, why is sky washed out?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Celcius, Jun 7, 2006.

  1. Celcius

    Celcius Guest

    Hi everyone!

    Why is the sky washed out while my wife with a point and shoot gets blue
    skys?
    It seems to me the sky was quite blue when I took this photo:
    http://celestart.com/images/publiques/15.jpg

    Any ideas? Recommendations?

    Thanks,

    Marcel
    Celcius, Jun 7, 2006
    #1
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  2. Celcius

    acl Guest

    Ed Ruf wrote:
    > First guess would be improper white balance. The exif info in the
    > photo says the camera was set to manual WB. So, exactly how did you
    > set it? If you're just beginning start with auto WB of set the proper
    > preset for the scene at hand, such as sunny for this scene.


    But did you look at the linked jpeg? The sky is just overexposed.
    acl, Jun 7, 2006
    #2
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  3. On Wed, 7 Jun 2006 09:22:04 -0400, Celcius <> wrote:
    > Hi everyone!
    >
    > Why is the sky washed out while my wife with a point and shoot gets blue
    > skys?
    > It seems to me the sky was quite blue when I took this photo:
    > http://celestart.com/images/publiques/15.jpg
    >
    > Any ideas? Recommendations?


    The sky is over-exposed; basically, it's so bright that the camera
    sensor is saturating and just sees it as "white". You needed to tell the
    camera to take in less light, either by using a faster shutter speed or
    by stopping down the lens. Depending on the features your camera has,
    there are a variety of ways of doing that.

    -dms
    Daniel Silevitch, Jun 7, 2006
    #3
  4. Celcius

    Celcius Guest

    "Daniel Silevitch" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Wed, 7 Jun 2006 09:22:04 -0400, Celcius <> wrote:
    > > Hi everyone!
    > >
    > > Why is the sky washed out while my wife with a point and shoot gets blue
    > > skys?
    > > It seems to me the sky was quite blue when I took this photo:
    > > http://celestart.com/images/publiques/15.jpg
    > >
    > > Any ideas? Recommendations?

    >
    > The sky is over-exposed; basically, it's so bright that the camera
    > sensor is saturating and just sees it as "white". You needed to tell the
    > camera to take in less light, either by using a faster shutter speed or
    > by stopping down the lens. Depending on the features your camera has,
    > there are a variety of ways of doing that.
    >
    > -dms


    Sorry Daniel, I forgot to say. I have a Canon Rebel XT and the lens I used
    was a Canon EF-S 17-85mm 1 4.5-5.6 IS USM
    Regards,
    Marcel
    Celcius, Jun 7, 2006
    #4
  5. Celcius

    Ed Ruf Guest

    On Wed, 7 Jun 2006 09:22:04 -0400, in rec.photo.digital "Celcius"
    <> wrote:

    >Hi everyone!
    >
    >Why is the sky washed out while my wife with a point and shoot gets blue
    >skys?
    >It seems to me the sky was quite blue when I took this photo:
    >http://celestart.com/images/publiques/15.jpg
    >
    >Any ideas? Recommendations?


    First guess would be improper white balance. The exif info in the
    photo says the camera was set to manual WB. So, exactly how did you
    set it? If you're just beginning start with auto WB of set the proper
    preset for the scene at hand, such as sunny for this scene.
    ________________________________________________________
    Ed Ruf Lifetime AMA# 344007 ()
    http://EdwardGRuf.com
    Ed Ruf, Jun 7, 2006
    #5
  6. On Wed, 7 Jun 2006 10:01:21 -0400, Celcius <> wrote:
    >
    > "Daniel Silevitch" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> On Wed, 7 Jun 2006 09:22:04 -0400, Celcius <> wrote:
    >> > Hi everyone!
    >> >
    >> > Why is the sky washed out while my wife with a point and shoot gets blue
    >> > skys?
    >> > It seems to me the sky was quite blue when I took this photo:
    >> > http://celestart.com/images/publiques/15.jpg
    >> >
    >> > Any ideas? Recommendations?

    >>
    >> The sky is over-exposed; basically, it's so bright that the camera
    >> sensor is saturating and just sees it as "white". You needed to tell the
    >> camera to take in less light, either by using a faster shutter speed or
    >> by stopping down the lens. Depending on the features your camera has,
    >> there are a variety of ways of doing that.
    >>
    >> -dms

    >
    > Sorry Daniel, I forgot to say. I have a Canon Rebel XT and the lens I used
    > was a Canon EF-S 17-85mm 1 4.5-5.6 IS USM


    OK, so you have a camera with a full set of manual controls. A few
    options:

    When you meter, meter on the sky rather than the house. This will
    convince the camera to take in less light.
    Meter on the house, but dial in a negative exposure compensation.
    Go into full manual mode, and set the aperture/shutter yourself
    Switch from JPG mode to RAW mode; there may be useful data in the RAW
    file that got lost when the camera converted to JPG.

    -dms
    Daniel Silevitch, Jun 7, 2006
    #6
  7. Celcius

    Annika1980 Guest

    The camera is exposing based on the dark tree in the center of the pic.
    In those situations you should either dial in some exposure
    compensation ( -1 would be a good starting point) or else simply go
    into manual mode and expose manually.

    And of course, if you shoot in RAW mode you might be able to recover
    most of the blown out highlights.
    Annika1980, Jun 7, 2006
    #7
  8. Celcius

    acl Guest

    Pat wrote:
    > The posts re the overexposed sky are generally correct. You can either
    > under expose or play with it in photoshop and fix it. Both are
    > perfectly good alternatives. Shooting in RAW might help, but RAW isn't
    > the cure-all than many people think.


    This is impossible to fix in photoshop (except by copying a sky from
    elsewhere), because the sky is just a solid area of 240 240 240.
    Obviously, there is not enough information there to do anything. If this
    had been shot in RAW, maybe it could have been saved, and maybe not.

    >
    > I am "old school" so take my advice accordingly. If you are taking
    > lots of pictures like that and want the sky to look better, keep the
    > sky from overexposing in the first place and everything after that is
    > much easier. The way to do that is to invest in a polarizing filter.
    > That will allow you to darken a sky like that (plus keep interesting
    > details in it) without underexposing the rest of the image. It will
    > also cut out most glare that you encounter.


    Indeed, a polariser is a good solution, not just to prevent overexposure
    but to give more saturated skies etc. I don't see how this is old
    school, though.
    >
    > For an autofocus lens, you want a "circular polarizer" (don't ask why,
    > it's a long story, you just want one).
    >
    > People in this group hate filters and they hate people who don't shoot
    > in RAW, but really, a filter is the answer. That's the way we did it
    > back in "the day" when we used that stuff called film.
    >
    > Good luck with it.
    >
    > Pat
    >
    acl, Jun 7, 2006
    #8
  9. On Wed, 07 Jun 2006 10:17:10 -0400, Ed Ruf <> wrote:
    > On Wed, 7 Jun 2006 09:22:04 -0400, in rec.photo.digital "Celcius"
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >>Hi everyone!
    >>
    >>Why is the sky washed out while my wife with a point and shoot gets blue
    >>skys?
    >>It seems to me the sky was quite blue when I took this photo:
    >>http://celestart.com/images/publiques/15.jpg
    >>
    >>Any ideas? Recommendations?

    >
    > First guess would be improper white balance. The exif info in the
    > photo says the camera was set to manual WB. So, exactly how did you
    > set it? If you're just beginning start with auto WB of set the proper
    > preset for the scene at hand, such as sunny for this scene.


    I'd have to disagree. Open it up in an editor, and look at the sky. It's
    a solid block of RGB 240,240,240. White-balance issues might give a
    screwed up color, but there'd be _some_ variation across the image.

    -dms
    Daniel Silevitch, Jun 7, 2006
    #9
  10. Celcius

    Pat Guest

    The posts re the overexposed sky are generally correct. You can either
    under expose or play with it in photoshop and fix it. Both are
    perfectly good alternatives. Shooting in RAW might help, but RAW isn't
    the cure-all than many people think.

    I am "old school" so take my advice accordingly. If you are taking
    lots of pictures like that and want the sky to look better, keep the
    sky from overexposing in the first place and everything after that is
    much easier. The way to do that is to invest in a polarizing filter.
    That will allow you to darken a sky like that (plus keep interesting
    details in it) without underexposing the rest of the image. It will
    also cut out most glare that you encounter.

    For an autofocus lens, you want a "circular polarizer" (don't ask why,
    it's a long story, you just want one).

    People in this group hate filters and they hate people who don't shoot
    in RAW, but really, a filter is the answer. That's the way we did it
    back in "the day" when we used that stuff called film.

    Good luck with it.

    Pat



    Celcius wrote:
    > Hi everyone!
    >
    > Why is the sky washed out while my wife with a point and shoot gets blue
    > skys?
    > It seems to me the sky was quite blue when I took this photo:
    > http://celestart.com/images/publiques/15.jpg
    >
    > Any ideas? Recommendations?
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Marcel
    Pat, Jun 7, 2006
    #10
  11. Celcius wrote:
    > Hi everyone!
    >
    > Why is the sky washed out while my wife with a point and shoot gets blue
    > skys?
    > It seems to me the sky was quite blue when I took this photo:


    single use cameras use a fast shutter speed and ISO400 film.
    that P&S might also were using a faster shutter speed than you set
    your SLR. set to exp.comp. -1 and the sky will be blue.
    thats what I did when taking a photo thru a tree stump into the sky.
    Mr.Bolshoyhuy, Jun 7, 2006
    #11
  12. Celcius

    Scott W Guest

    Celcius wrote:
    > Hi everyone!
    >
    > Why is the sky washed out while my wife with a point and shoot gets blue
    > skys?
    > It seems to me the sky was quite blue when I took this photo:
    > http://celestart.com/images/publiques/15.jpg
    >
    > Any ideas? Recommendations?
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Marcel

    As others have said the sky is over exposed

    learn to always shoot raw, you will be much happier, I would be very
    surprised is the raw file of the exact shoot could not pull out a nice
    looking blue sky.

    In cases of a bright background, and many other hard lighting cases,
    you can bracket to good effect.

    Since the XT can take a jpeg file at the same time it does a raw you
    can easily do some test taking the same type of shot and checking to
    see how much better the image from the raw file can be compared to the
    jpeg the camera produces.

    Scott
    Scott W, Jun 7, 2006
    #12
  13. Celcius

    Jim Guest

    Careful use of a graduated neutral density filter might help getting good
    color in the sky. What you need to do is cut down on the exposure of the
    sky while leaving everything else alone.
    Jim
    "Pat" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > The posts re the overexposed sky are generally correct. You can either
    > under expose or play with it in photoshop and fix it. Both are
    > perfectly good alternatives. Shooting in RAW might help, but RAW isn't
    > the cure-all than many people think.
    >
    > I am "old school" so take my advice accordingly. If you are taking
    > lots of pictures like that and want the sky to look better, keep the
    > sky from overexposing in the first place and everything after that is
    > much easier. The way to do that is to invest in a polarizing filter.
    > That will allow you to darken a sky like that (plus keep interesting
    > details in it) without underexposing the rest of the image. It will
    > also cut out most glare that you encounter.
    >
    > For an autofocus lens, you want a "circular polarizer" (don't ask why,
    > it's a long story, you just want one).
    >
    > People in this group hate filters and they hate people who don't shoot
    > in RAW, but really, a filter is the answer. That's the way we did it
    > back in "the day" when we used that stuff called film.
    >
    > Good luck with it.
    >
    > Pat
    >
    >
    >
    > Celcius wrote:
    >> Hi everyone!
    >>
    >> Why is the sky washed out while my wife with a point and shoot gets blue
    >> skys?
    >> It seems to me the sky was quite blue when I took this photo:
    >> http://celestart.com/images/publiques/15.jpg
    >>
    >> Any ideas? Recommendations?
    >>
    >> Thanks,
    >>
    >> Marcel

    >
    Jim, Jun 7, 2006
    #13
  14. Celcius

    GF3 Guest

    Celcius wrote:

    >
    > "Daniel Silevitch" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> On Wed, 7 Jun 2006 09:22:04 -0400, Celcius <> wrote:
    >> > Hi everyone!
    >> >
    >> > Why is the sky washed out while my wife with a point and shoot gets
    >> > blue skys?
    >> > It seems to me the sky was quite blue when I took this photo:
    >> > http://celestart.com/images/publiques/15.jpg
    >> >
    >> > Any ideas? Recommendations?

    >>
    >> The sky is over-exposed; basically, it's so bright that the camera
    >> sensor is saturating and just sees it as "white". You needed to tell the
    >> camera to take in less light, either by using a faster shutter speed or
    >> by stopping down the lens. Depending on the features your camera has,
    >> there are a variety of ways of doing that.
    >>
    >> -dms

    >
    > Sorry Daniel, I forgot to say. I have a Canon Rebel XT and the lens I used
    > was a Canon EF-S 17-85mm 1 4.5-5.6 IS USM
    > Regards,
    > Marcel
    >
    >

    Canon's have poor exposure latitude. You will have to underexpose every shot
    to prevent blowout.

    Experiment until you find the best compromise.

    --
    George Fritschmann III
    GF3, Jun 7, 2006
    #14
  15. Celcius

    Celcius Guest

    "Ed Ruf" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Wed, 7 Jun 2006 09:22:04 -0400, in rec.photo.digital "Celcius"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > >Hi everyone!
    > >
    > >Why is the sky washed out while my wife with a point and shoot gets blue
    > >skys?
    > >It seems to me the sky was quite blue when I took this photo:
    > >http://celestart.com/images/publiques/15.jpg
    > >
    > >Any ideas? Recommendations?

    >
    > First guess would be improper white balance. The exif info in the
    > photo says the camera was set to manual WB. So, exactly how did you
    > set it? If you're just beginning start with auto WB of set the proper
    > preset for the scene at hand, such as sunny for this scene.
    > ________________________________________________________
    > Ed Ruf Lifetime AMA# 344007 ()
    > http://EdwardGRuf.com


    Ed,
    My was st at "sunny"
    Marcel
    Celcius, Jun 7, 2006
    #15
  16. Celcius

    Celcius Guest

    "Pat" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > The posts re the overexposed sky are generally correct. You can either
    > under expose or play with it in photoshop and fix it. Both are
    > perfectly good alternatives. Shooting in RAW might help, but RAW isn't
    > the cure-all than many people think.
    >
    > I am "old school" so take my advice accordingly. If you are taking
    > lots of pictures like that and want the sky to look better, keep the
    > sky from overexposing in the first place and everything after that is
    > much easier. The way to do that is to invest in a polarizing filter.
    > That will allow you to darken a sky like that (plus keep interesting
    > details in it) without underexposing the rest of the image. It will
    > also cut out most glare that you encounter.
    >
    > For an autofocus lens, you want a "circular polarizer" (don't ask why,
    > it's a long story, you just want one).
    >
    > People in this group hate filters and they hate people who don't shoot
    > in RAW, but really, a filter is the answer. That's the way we did it
    > back in "the day" when we used that stuff called film.
    >
    > Good luck with it.
    >
    > Pat
    >

    Thanks Pat.
    I tried with my polarizing filter and it turned a tad better. However, the
    sky was still ooverexposed ;-(
    I can't try again now because it's overcast... we're getting rain soon ...
    Marcel
    Celcius, Jun 7, 2006
    #16
  17. Celcius

    acl Guest

    King Sardon wrote:
    > On 7 Jun 2006 08:06:03 -0700, "Pat" <>
    > wrote:
    > A polarizing filter will help little with a hazy sky, and the picture
    > shows a hazy sky.
    >
    > KS


    It shows an overexposed sky. The original poster also says it was blue;
    so it's probably just overexposed, not hazy.
    acl, Jun 7, 2006
    #17
  18. Hi,

    > I tried with my polarizing filter and it turned a tad better.
    > However, the sky was still ooverexposed ;-( I can't try again now
    > because it's overcast... we're getting rain soon ...


    I don't think any filter will help another way you couldn't achieve
    using only your camera. You just need less light, that is a
    smaller aperture or a shorter shutter time.

    I suggest next time you give it a try with various exposure settings,
    ranging from -2 ... +2 compensation and take images simultaneously as
    jpeg and RAW. Then have a look on the computer and judge which is best
    so you'll know for the next time which way to go. After all: taking an
    image more doesn't cost a single cent. Just be sure to delete the
    unworthy pictures.

    From my experience there is a lot more to raw data than jpeg, especially
    if the light situation is difficult: you can safely alter exposure by
    +/-2 levels on the computer. The backdraw is that it requires a lot of
    time afterwards.

    Best regards,
    Ingoo
    Ingo von Borstel, Jun 7, 2006
    #18
  19. Celcius

    King Sardon Guest

    On 7 Jun 2006 08:06:03 -0700, "Pat" <>
    wrote:

    > The way to do that is to invest in a polarizing filter.
    >That will allow you to darken a sky like that (plus keep interesting
    >details in it) without underexposing the rest of the image. It will
    >also cut out most glare that you encounter.


    A polarizing filter will help little with a hazy sky, and the picture
    shows a hazy sky.

    KS
    King Sardon, Jun 7, 2006
    #19
  20. Scott W wrote:
    > Celcius wrote:
    >> Hi everyone!
    >>
    >> Why is the sky washed out while my wife with a point and shoot gets blue
    >> skys?
    >> It seems to me the sky was quite blue when I took this photo:
    >> http://celestart.com/images/publiques/15.jpg
    >>
    >> Any ideas? Recommendations?
    >>
    >> Thanks,
    >>
    >> Marcel

    > As others have said the sky is over exposed
    >
    > learn to always shoot raw, you will be much happier, I would be very
    > surprised is the raw file of the exact shoot could not pull out a nice
    > looking blue sky.
    >
    > In cases of a bright background, and many other hard lighting cases,
    > you can bracket to good effect.
    >
    > Since the XT can take a jpeg file at the same time it does a raw you
    > can easily do some test taking the same type of shot and checking to
    > see how much better the image from the raw file can be compared to the
    > jpeg the camera produces.
    >


    But that's well after the fact. There's but one review on the camera,
    and I suggest concentrating on the histogram. Also, the blinking sky in
    the review would be a big hint.

    Bracketing in RAW gives incredible latitude. Even a single RAW image can
    be developed in, say, two different ways, one for the house, and one for
    the sky. Then you can layer the two, mask one, and paint on the mask to
    reveal the bottom layer.

    --
    John McWilliams
    John McWilliams, Jun 7, 2006
    #20
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