Please recomend me a Anti-Phishing Guide website.....................!!!!!

Discussion in 'Computer Security' started by David M. Dinner, Jan 25, 2005.

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    There is an article in the January 24, 2005: Issue 4 of InfoWorld. "The
    Dangers of Phishing:"
    www.infoworld.com/article/05/01/21/04FEphishing_1.html There is also a
    lot throughout the issue.

    David Michael Dinner <> 570/947-3110
    Owner, Obtix Networks: http://www.obtix.net
    Personal Site: http://obtix.org
    Public Key: http://www.obtix.net/~ddinner/dmd-pub-key


    ** INTERNET EMAIL CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE **
    This email contains confidential information which may also be legally
    privileged and which is intended only for the use of the recipient(s)
    named above. If you are not the intended recipient you are hereby
    notified that reading, forwarding, or copying of this email; or the
    taking of any action in reliance on its contents, may be strictly
    prohibited.



    Ronald Reitch LMT wrote:
    | I'm concerned for my mother's sake. My mother is very new to computing
    | so much so that she uses remote assistance with me to guide her
    | through her computing. Recently a pop-up requested her to charge her
    | $14.95 on her credit card in which she gullibly reply to!
    | I am very much alarmed by this that someone could easily deceive my
    | mother and wish to protect my mother as much as possible by giving her
    | as much information as possible. Is there any web site on Internet
    | that can easily explain how phishing works and steps to protect
    | yourself?
    | Thank you!
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    uXpV8QBQGoVmDpIvJTz8Be0=
    =FixE
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    David M. Dinner, Jan 25, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertising

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    haha, well good for you not only did you waste a good four minutes
    writing that pointless reply your making me waste a good thirty seconds
    writing a reply. simple.. its the same account i use for mail - same
    signature - i am to lazy to delete the signature everytime i post
    online. howerver; this time i deleted it for you.. happy?

    David Michael Dinner <> 570/947-3110
    Owner, Obtix Networks: http://www.obtix.net
    Personal Site: http://obtix.org
    Public Key: http://www.obtix.net/~ddinner/dmd-pub-key


    David Postill wrote:
    | In article <>, on Tue, 25 Jan 2005
    03:05:01 +0000, "David M.
    | Dinner" <> wrote:
    |
    | []
    |
    | | ** INTERNET EMAIL CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE **
    | | This email contains confidential information which may also be legally
    | | privileged and which is intended only for the use of the recipient(s)
    | | named above. If you are not the intended recipient you are hereby
    | | notified that reading, forwarding, or copying of this email; or the
    | | taking of any action in reliance on its contents, may be strictly
    | | prohibited.
    |
    | Huh?
    |
    | 1/ This medium is not email it is usenet.
    |
    | 2/ You didn't name any recipients you sent it to, probably millions of
    people
    | subscribe to this newsgroup.
    |
    | 3/ Many servers will have forwarded this post automatically. That's
    how usenet
    | works.
    |
    | 4/ Millions of people have now copied it.
    |
    | 5/ Nothing in the post was confidential.
    |
    | 6/ May be prohibited? Under whose laws? This is an international
    medium. Are you
    | threatening to sue me for damages in the UK?
    |
    | 7/ Points 1 to 6 make you look stupid.
    |
    | Your notice is worth less than the electrons it was written with.
    |
    | ;)
    |
    |
    |
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    =+yKW
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    David M. Dinner, Jan 25, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. I'm concerned for my mother's sake. My mother is very new to computing
    so much so that she uses remote assistance with me to guide her
    through her computing. Recently a pop-up requested her to charge her
    $14.95 on her credit card in which she gullibly reply to!
    I am very much alarmed by this that someone could easily deceive my
    mother and wish to protect my mother as much as possible by giving her
    as much information as possible. Is there any web site on Internet
    that can easily explain how phishing works and steps to protect
    yourself?
    Thank you!
     
    Ronald Reitch LMT, Jan 25, 2005
    #3
  4. In article <>, on Tue, 25 Jan 2005 03:05:01 +0000, "David M.
    Dinner" <> wrote:

    []

    | ** INTERNET EMAIL CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE **
    | This email contains confidential information which may also be legally
    | privileged and which is intended only for the use of the recipient(s)
    | named above. If you are not the intended recipient you are hereby
    | notified that reading, forwarding, or copying of this email; or the
    | taking of any action in reliance on its contents, may be strictly
    | prohibited.

    Huh?

    1/ This medium is not email it is usenet.

    2/ You didn't name any recipients you sent it to, probably millions of people
    subscribe to this newsgroup.

    3/ Many servers will have forwarded this post automatically. That's how usenet
    works.

    4/ Millions of people have now copied it.

    5/ Nothing in the post was confidential.

    6/ May be prohibited? Under whose laws? This is an international medium. Are you
    threatening to sue me for damages in the UK?

    7/ Points 1 to 6 make you look stupid.

    Your notice is worth less than the electrons it was written with.

    ;)



    --
    <davidp />
    DavidPostill
     
    David Postill, Jan 25, 2005
    #4
  5. David M. Dinner

    Reader Guest

    Ronald Reitch LMT wrote:

    > I am very much alarmed by this that someone could easily deceive my
    > mother and wish to protect my mother as much as possible by giving her
    > as much information as possible.


    Simple: Just tell her never to give out any personal info that she did
    not actively initiate herself. Can't get much simpler than that.
     
    Reader, Jan 25, 2005
    #5
  6. In article <>, on Tue, 25 Jan 2005 05:27:41 +0000, "David M.
    Dinner" <> wrote:

    | -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    | Hash: SHA1
    |
    | haha, well good for you not only did you waste a good four minutes
    | writing that pointless reply your making me waste a good thirty seconds
    | writing a reply. simple.. its the same account i use for mail - same
    | signature - i am to lazy to delete the signature everytime i post
    | online. howerver; this time i deleted it for you.. happy?

    He he. I'm a fast typist. Took me all of 30 seconds.

    Yes I'm happy now. As I was before. Did you not see the smiley?

    --
    <davidp />
    DavidPostill
     
    David Postill, Jan 25, 2005
    #6
  7. David M. Dinner

    donnie Guest

    On Tue, 25 Jan 2005 16:28:45 GMT, Ronald Reitch LMT
    <> wrote:

    >I'm concerned for my mother's sake. My mother is very new to computing
    >so much so that she uses remote assistance with me to guide her
    >through her computing. Recently a pop-up requested her to charge her
    >$14.95 on her credit card in which she gullibly reply to!
    >I am very much alarmed by this that someone could easily deceive my
    >mother and wish to protect my mother as much as possible by giving her
    >as much information as possible. Is there any web site on Internet
    >that can easily explain how phishing works and steps to protect
    >yourself?
    >Thank you!

    #############################
    Disable javascript, active scripting and activex in the browser and
    she won't get any popups. The teach her some street smarts.
    donnie.
     
    donnie, Jan 25, 2005
    #7
  8. David M. Dinner

    winged Guest

    donnie wrote:
    > On Tue, 25 Jan 2005 16:28:45 GMT, Ronald Reitch LMT
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I'm concerned for my mother's sake. My mother is very new to computing
    >>so much so that she uses remote assistance with me to guide her
    >>through her computing. Recently a pop-up requested her to charge her
    >>$14.95 on her credit card in which she gullibly reply to!
    >>I am very much alarmed by this that someone could easily deceive my
    >>mother and wish to protect my mother as much as possible by giving her
    >>as much information as possible. Is there any web site on Internet
    >>that can easily explain how phishing works and steps to protect
    >>yourself?
    >>Thank you!

    >
    > #############################
    > Disable javascript, active scripting and activex in the browser and
    > she won't get any popups. The teach her some street smarts.
    > donnie.

    Maybe, One can also use windows messaging to initiate a pretty
    authentic pop-up that might be mis-understood by a novice because it is
    different.

    This is a good case for requiring licenses on the super hi-way :-O

    Actually the job of user education is not taught in one session. While
    most of those on these groups, have had years to learn what little we
    know the many mom users out there do not understand why the digital box
    is not like the kitchen toaster or the TV or the another marvelous
    "RELIABLE" inventions of their age. Most users, when it comes to their
    home computers, do not even understand why anyone would even want to see
    any information on their computer, and they don't care if they do, I
    mean I am just exchanging e-mail with the church ladies .. right.

    The psychology of a Mom user is fascinating, their logic so uncomputer like.

    In order to reach a user, Techoplebes have major hurdles to conquer.
    There are bytes (sumthin Mom does for lunch), hard drives (she still
    snickers about that) floppies (boy does she know what that is). The
    language barrier is one heck of a hurdle. When we talk of north or
    south bridges they wonder which southern bridge you may be referring to.
    She heard of zombies, she remembers them from that movie she saw along
    time ago, what was its name? But Mom doesn't want to interrupt you, you
    seem to be on a roll. When training large groups of users it is even
    more difficult to keep the bright boys listening and not losing the Moms
    in the process. You know, it's just all so technical.

    I have found when dealing with those who did not grow up putting teeth
    marks in a keyboard that you must get the message to them in bits
    instead of bytes.

    1. They must learn in this order:
    a. First you must convince them that their computer is valuable to bad
    people. There are articles on the net of zombies being sold and traded.
    News from sites she has heard of, describing the various problems with
    zombies and how they were bought and sold are invaluable. News articles
    are best, they read very well, and can re-read without interruption, to
    understand. Do not talk your Mom into Internet banking, this is your
    inheritance we are talking about;-) Let these professional news article
    convince them that there are bad guys in this world. If you can convince
    Mom in a month that their are bad things as well as good things inside
    of a month, your doing good. Feed her the articles slowly, her
    attention span is limited to 5 minutes a day. This kills the first
    obstacle to teaching, as they no longer drift off thinking about why.

    b. Email Mom often. Ensure Moms e-mail client is not script enabled.
    You will need to ensure it is link enabled however, she will not
    understand if she clicks on a link and it don't go anywhere. Moms love
    that friendly note from their kid that always has an interesting article
    at the end. When e-mails from her friends don't dance, tell her you
    will try to fix it next week(don't but she'll know you would if you
    could securely). Set Google as her home page (set a link to email if
    she uses webmail). Then show her the news link. Then ask her to think
    of anything and put it in google. Some can spend hours entertaining
    themselves.

    2. Lockdown her computer. Install the software with the root account
    and give Mom her own account that uses her name as a login name ( give
    her a reasonably complex password, pass phrases work pretty well with
    older things like 3Men1Tub or something along those lines,I know bad
    security practice, but this is MOM). Since it's MOMs computer you
    should ensure she has the root login, recommend writing it on the back
    of her monitor where she can't see it easily so you can remember it next
    time you visit (remember long and complex password make it very hard for
    her to get into that account). When talking to Mom about her password
    warn her of the evils that websites collect when they ask for emails and
    logins (she will use her system login for websites ...shudder). Give
    her Firefox and hide the IE icon. This will stop most of the crapolla
    her church friends send her to.

    3. Give her a firewall that is noisy but unobtrusive. Nortons popping
    globe will keep her excited enough. Just set it where the globe pops
    out every time she gets an unsolicited request...explain to her thats
    someone trying to get in(it may not be but who knows, she won't). Your
    next visit you might want to reduce the rules to where it is not as
    noisy but a week or so she'll understand it's her against a world of bad
    guys, and her computer runs so well now since you fixed it. You've
    accomplished a lot in a couple months. Try to teach her good practices
    slowly. Keep her out of root and the dark place (command window) as
    much as possible, and ensure her system stays patched. If you
    accomplish this, Mom will be leaps and bounds above her peers, and
    better protected than 90%.

    Mom probably won't load much, I mean solitaire is so cool, but she has a
    son who worries so much about her and he writes her all the time, (even
    if he is in the basement), that she'll leave you all her worldly goods
    including those old shares from the 50's in that old typewriter company.
    When she does, I could use a vacation in the Bahamas.

    Winged
     
    winged, Jan 26, 2005
    #8
  9. David M. Dinner

    donnie Guest

    On 25 Jan 2005 22:47:29 EST, winged <> wrote:

    >Maybe, One can also use windows messaging to initiate a pretty
    >authentic pop-up that might be mis-understood by a novice because it is
    >different.
    >
    >This is a good case for requiring licenses on the super hi-way :-O
    >
    >Actually the job of user education is not taught in one session.

    #########################
    snip long story.
    Ok, I agree on disabling windows messaging. It's have it disabled on
    my PC too. Forget the licensing idea. Maybe you were just joking. As
    far as teaching Moms internert smarts, let me ralate a short story.
    My father is in his 80s and is an internet user. When my sister
    clicked on some attachment and it sent the worm to his PC, 2 of my
    brothers' PC and mine, my father was the smart one who didn't click on
    the attachment. I didn't click on it either. My brothers did. You
    would think it would be the other way around, that my father would be
    the one. So, the point is, if you know how to explain what the deal
    is, it won't take all that much time and effort.
    donnie
     
    donnie, Jan 26, 2005
    #9
  10. David M. Dinner

    Nick Roberts Guest

    Ronald Reitch LMT <> wrote:

    > I'm concerned for my mother's sake. My mother is very new to computing so
    > much so that she uses remote assistance with me to guide her through her
    > computing. Recently a pop-up requested her to charge her $14.95 on her
    > credit card in which she gullibly reply to! I am very much alarmed by this
    > that someone could easily deceive my mother and wish to protect my mother
    > as much as possible by giving her as much information as possible. Is
    > there any web site on Internet that can easily explain how phishing works
    > and steps to protect yourself? Thank you!


    One possible site is:

    http://www.antiphishing.org/consumer_recs.html

    It mentions a free 'ScamBlocker' at:

    http://www.earthlink.net/earthlinktoolbar/download/

    I can't personally recommend it, but it looks like it might be helpful to
    you. HTH

    --
    Nick Roberts
     
    Nick Roberts, Jan 27, 2005
    #10
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