PIX 501 - No Spanning Tree?

Discussion in 'Cisco' started by jeremy.nielson@gmail.com, Apr 14, 2006.

  1. Guest

    Here's a PIX twist.

    The PIX 501 comes with a built-in 4 port 10/100 switch. But a feature
    missing from the switch is Spanning Tree.

    We took two 501s, hooked them back to back and pinged an ip address.
    Zing! Broadcast storm.

    I suppose it doesn't need to have this feature to be called a "switch".
    It seems rather goofy to not implement STP. Anyone got a guess on
    this one?
    , Apr 14, 2006
    #1
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  2. In article <>,
    <> wrote:
    >Here's a PIX twist.


    >The PIX 501 comes with a built-in 4 port 10/100 switch. But a feature
    >missing from the switch is Spanning Tree.


    >We took two 501s, hooked them back to back and pinged an ip address.
    >Zing! Broadcast storm.


    >I suppose it doesn't need to have this feature to be called a "switch".


    The four-port switch chip is there as a convenience for home users,
    and *very* small businesses, few of whom encounter issues with
    topology loops. The capabilities of the switch are exactly the
    same as those you find on the back of the typical broadband firewall
    or wireless access point. At no time has Cisco ever advertised
    it to be a "managed switch".

    >It seems rather goofy to not implement STP. Anyone got a guess on
    >this one?


    The PIX 501 is the -only- PIX with a switch. In order to support STP,
    Cisco would have had to have added code just for that one low-end
    model, and they would have had to change the CLI and PDM in order to
    allow the STP parameters to be adjusted and to support disabling the
    spanning tree per port, and then people would probably expect portfast
    too. I don't think the typical home / small business user would
    appreciate turning on their computer and then having to wait one
    minute before they could use the internet because the PIX was running
    STP on the off-chance that they had another network device.

    Indeed, more than this: in order to support STP they would have had
    to replace the switch chip with one in which the ports were
    individually addressible, and they would have had to allocate one
    MAC per port (STP requires unique MAC per port.)

    All of this work would have driven the price of the PIX 501 up
    noticably, for next to no real benefit. If your network is complex
    enough to need multiple PIX and complex enough for you to need STP,
    then it is complex enough for you to drop a managed switch in and
    to use that instead of the supplied switch-chip.
    Walter Roberson, Apr 14, 2006
    #2
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  3. <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Here's a PIX twist.
    >
    > The PIX 501 comes with a built-in 4 port 10/100 switch. But a feature
    > missing from the switch is Spanning Tree.
    >
    > We took two 501s, hooked them back to back and pinged an ip address.
    > Zing! Broadcast storm.
    >


    What you are saying does not make any sense.
    having two switches daisychained does not imply that you need STP running !
    STP is inorder for you to have a loop-free environment, and aslong as you do
    not connect more than one link between your "2 pix501 back-2-back senario",
    you are in a loop-free setup.


    If you experience what you called a broadcast storm, it must rely on other
    factors.


    > I suppose it doesn't need to have this feature to be called a "switch".
    > It seems rather goofy to not implement STP. Anyone got a guess on
    > this one?


    The pix501 build-in 4 port switch is a non-managable/transpernt switch.
    would be pretty "goofy" to implement STP and not per-port speed/duplex
    capacity settings etc.

    rgds
    Martin Bilgrav

    >
    Martin Bilgrav, Apr 16, 2006
    #3
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