Photoshop CS2 and RAM?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by PeteD, Oct 19, 2006.

  1. PeteD

    PeteD Guest

    Hi,

    I'm thinking of buying CS2 (I have PS6). I'm concerned about RAM
    requirements. I have a 2.4GHz P4 with 512Mb RAM. I suspect a memory
    upgrade may be tricky due to the age of the PC.

    Is anyone out there running CS2 on a similar spec machine?

    Also is it worth the upgrade from PS6. I like the look of the file
    management stuff and I just got a D80 so I need a Raw converter too. I
    understand Nikon Capture NX (other option) is really slow on a machine
    like mine....

    Thanks for any feedback.
    Cheers
    Pete
    PeteD, Oct 19, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. PeteD

    sally Guest

    In article <>,
    PeteD <> wrote:
    >I'm thinking of buying CS2 (I have PS6). I'm concerned about RAM
    >requirements. I have a 2.4GHz P4 with 512Mb RAM. I suspect a memory
    >upgrade may be tricky due to the age of the PC.


    Memory usage depends a lot on the sizes of the images you are editing.
    If your images are 640x480 or so, then performance won't be too bad on
    your machine. If you want good performance when editing 5MP images,
    then more memory and a faster CPU will make a very noticable difference.
    sally, Oct 19, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. In article <>,
    PeteD <> writes
    >Hi,
    >
    >I'm thinking of buying CS2 (I have PS6). I'm concerned about RAM
    >requirements. I have a 2.4GHz P4 with 512Mb RAM. I suspect a memory
    >upgrade may be tricky due to the age of the PC.
    >
    >Is anyone out there running CS2 on a similar spec machine?
    >
    >Also is it worth the upgrade from PS6. I like the look of the file
    >management stuff and I just got a D80 so I need a Raw converter too. I
    >understand Nikon Capture NX (other option) is really slow on a machine
    >like mine....
    >

    Works fine on my PC with a 1.4 GHz AMD chip and 512 Mb of RAM. Well, it
    is a bit slow to open, move to Bridge etc, but nothing I can't live with
    until I replace the PC.

    The upgrade is well worthwhile; I moved from PS 7.0 and thought it was a
    good move. Bridge, plus the built in RAW converter, and several of the
    tools, are all very useful.

    David
    --
    David Littlewood
    David Littlewood, Oct 20, 2006
    #3
  4. "PeteD" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    > Hi,
    >
    > I'm thinking of buying CS2 (I have PS6). I'm concerned about RAM
    > requirements. I have a 2.4GHz P4 with 512Mb RAM. I suspect a memory
    > upgrade may be tricky due to the age of the PC.
    >
    > Is anyone out there running CS2 on a similar spec machine?
    >
    > Also is it worth the upgrade from PS6. I like the look of the file
    > management stuff and I just got a D80 so I need a Raw converter too. I
    > understand Nikon Capture NX (other option) is really slow on a machine
    > like mine....


    I am using the Nikon Capture NX trial and I have 512MB ram on my laptop and
    it is very slow to render D80 Nefs! Nefs from my D70s are faster to process
    in Capture NX as they are a *lot* smaller, so a memory upgrade to 1GB ram
    (the most my laptop will hold) is a priority.
    Adrian Boliston, Oct 20, 2006
    #4
  5. PeteD

    Bill Crocker Guest

    "PeteD" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I'm thinking of buying CS2 (I have PS6). I'm concerned about RAM
    > requirements. I have a 2.4GHz P4 with 512Mb RAM. I suspect a memory
    > upgrade may be tricky due to the age of the PC.
    >
    > Is anyone out there running CS2 on a similar spec machine?
    >
    > Also is it worth the upgrade from PS6. I like the look of the file
    > management stuff and I just got a D80 so I need a Raw converter too. I
    > understand Nikon Capture NX (other option) is really slow on a machine
    > like mine....
    >
    > Thanks for any feedback.
    > Cheers
    > Pete
    >


    Memory upgrades are very easy to do! Click below for more info:

    http://www.crucial.com/

    Make sure your computer is turned OFF, and unplugged! Be very careful
    regarding static electricity.

    Bill Crocker
    Bill Crocker, Oct 20, 2006
    #5
  6. PeteD

    bmoag Guest

    Your CPU is fine.
    D80 files are huge (~30mb) and double that in 16 bit color.
    Nikon NX is a memory hog, kind of a dinosaur in terms of programming. It is
    not possible to have NX, CS2 and Bridge open simultaneously with only 512
    mbs of RAM unless you plan to paint your house and watch the paint dry while
    waiting for images to render.
    You need a minimum of 1gb ram.
    With 2 gbs RAM you will be astounded at the performance increase.
    bmoag, Oct 20, 2006
    #6
  7. PeteD

    Mark² Guest

    PeteD wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I'm thinking of buying CS2 (I have PS6). I'm concerned about RAM
    > requirements. I have a 2.4GHz P4 with 512Mb RAM. I suspect a memory
    > upgrade may be tricky due to the age of the PC.
    >
    > Is anyone out there running CS2 on a similar spec machine?


    Yes. It's OK, but definitely starts the hard-drive rattling with much of a
    history file list.

    > Also is it worth the upgrade from PS6. I like the look of the file
    > management stuff and I just got a D80 so I need a Raw converter too. I
    > understand Nikon Capture NX (other option) is really slow on a machine
    > like mine....


    You shouldn't have any trouble at all finding RAM for a Pentium 4
    motherboard.
    2GB of RAM would be a huge boost...and the cost is fairly modest.

    I run CS2 on a P4 with 2GB, and do quite well...even with large 5D RAW
    files. But add a few layers on 16 bit tif files, and you'll soon be wishing
    for yet more RAM...


    --
    Images (Plus Snaps & Grabs) by Mark² at:
    www.pbase.com/markuson
    Mark², Oct 20, 2006
    #7
  8. PeteD

    Jan Guest

    "PeteD" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I'm thinking of buying CS2 (I have PS6). I'm concerned about RAM
    > requirements. I have a 2.4GHz P4 with 512Mb RAM. I suspect a memory
    > upgrade may be tricky due to the age of the PC.
    >
    > Is anyone out there running CS2 on a similar spec machine?
    >
    > Also is it worth the upgrade from PS6. I like the look of the file
    > management stuff and I just got a D80 so I need a Raw converter too. I
    > understand Nikon Capture NX (other option) is really slow on a machine
    > like mine....
    >
    > Thanks for any feedback.
    > Cheers
    > Pete


    Adobe Photoshop CS2 was extremly slow on my laptop with 512 MB (no memory
    upgrade possible).
    Even starting the application was slow, the information windows reacted slow
    without any file was opened.

    After installing the upgrade from the Adobe website, the speed increased a
    lot.

    Jan
    Jan, Oct 20, 2006
    #8
  9. PeteD

    Roy G Guest

    "Bill Crocker" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > "PeteD" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Hi,
    >>
    >> I'm thinking of buying CS2 (I have PS6). I'm concerned about RAM
    >> requirements. I have a 2.4GHz P4 with 512Mb RAM. I suspect a memory
    >> upgrade may be tricky due to the age of the PC.
    >>
    >> Is anyone out there running CS2 on a similar spec machine?
    >>
    >> Also is it worth the upgrade from PS6. I like the look of the file
    >> management stuff and I just got a D80 so I need a Raw converter too. I
    >> understand Nikon Capture NX (other option) is really slow on a machine
    >> like mine....
    >>
    >> Thanks for any feedback.
    >> Cheers
    >> Pete
    >>

    >
    > Memory upgrades are very easy to do! Click below for more info:
    >
    > http://www.crucial.com/
    >
    > Make sure your computer is turned OFF, and unplugged! Be very careful
    > regarding static electricity.
    >
    > Bill Crocker



    Woops.

    Computer should be switched off, and turned off at the wall socket.

    But the power cable should be kept plugged in, so that the computer case is
    still connected to Earth, and you should touch a bare metal part of the case
    frequently to discharge Static from yourself.

    Roy G
    Roy G, Oct 20, 2006
    #9
  10. PeteD

    Dave Cohen Guest

    Mark² wrote:
    > PeteD wrote:
    >> Hi,
    >>
    >> I'm thinking of buying CS2 (I have PS6). I'm concerned about RAM
    >> requirements. I have a 2.4GHz P4 with 512Mb RAM. I suspect a memory
    >> upgrade may be tricky due to the age of the PC.
    >>
    >> Is anyone out there running CS2 on a similar spec machine?

    >
    > Yes. It's OK, but definitely starts the hard-drive rattling with much of a
    > history file list.
    >
    >> Also is it worth the upgrade from PS6. I like the look of the file
    >> management stuff and I just got a D80 so I need a Raw converter too. I
    >> understand Nikon Capture NX (other option) is really slow on a machine
    >> like mine....

    >
    > You shouldn't have any trouble at all finding RAM for a Pentium 4
    > motherboard.
    > 2GB of RAM would be a huge boost...and the cost is fairly modest.
    >

    If you still have the MB manual use that to get correct memory type. If
    not, make sure you get the correct memory type for your MB.
    The only real problem you might run into is if they filled the available
    slots, which means you would have to remove what you have and discard.
    My machine has two slots, with a single 512mb, so it would be easy for
    me to upgrade to 1gb. Beyond that I would have to discard what I have.
    Dave Cohen


    > I run CS2 on a P4 with 2GB, and do quite well...even with large 5D RAW
    > files. But add a few layers on 16 bit tif files, and you'll soon be wishing
    > for yet more RAM...
    >
    >
    Dave Cohen, Oct 20, 2006
    #10
  11. PeteD

    Bill Crocker Guest

    "Roy G" <> wrote in message
    news:8g3_g.25132$...
    >
    > "Bill Crocker" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >>
    >> "PeteD" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> Hi,
    >>>
    >>> I'm thinking of buying CS2 (I have PS6). I'm concerned about RAM
    >>> requirements. I have a 2.4GHz P4 with 512Mb RAM. I suspect a memory
    >>> upgrade may be tricky due to the age of the PC.
    >>>
    >>> Is anyone out there running CS2 on a similar spec machine?
    >>>
    >>> Also is it worth the upgrade from PS6. I like the look of the file
    >>> management stuff and I just got a D80 so I need a Raw converter too. I
    >>> understand Nikon Capture NX (other option) is really slow on a machine
    >>> like mine....
    >>>
    >>> Thanks for any feedback.
    >>> Cheers
    >>> Pete
    >>>

    >>
    >> Memory upgrades are very easy to do! Click below for more info:
    >>
    >> http://www.crucial.com/
    >>
    >> Make sure your computer is turned OFF, and unplugged! Be very careful
    >> regarding static electricity.
    >>
    >> Bill Crocker

    >
    >
    > Woops.
    >
    > Computer should be switched off, and turned off at the wall socket.
    >
    > But the power cable should be kept plugged in, so that the computer case
    > is
    > still connected to Earth, and you should touch a bare metal part of the
    > case
    > frequently to discharge Static from yourself.
    >
    > Roy G
    >


    I wouldn't recomend that with most computers made in the last five years or
    so! The motherboard is activly under power even though the On/Off switch
    has been turned Off! They maintain power to the mother board so that
    varuous automated processes can occur, such as remote power-on via network
    interface cards, etc. You can confirm this on most systems by pulling the
    side cover off, and looking for a really small green LED on the mother board
    that will be on.

    If you just ground yourself to the metal case, that should be adiquate.
    I've been doing that for over twenty five years without ever damaging any
    parts.

    Bill Crocker
    Bill Crocker, Oct 20, 2006
    #11
  12. In article <>, Bill Crocker
    <> writes
    >
    >"Roy G" <> wrote in message
    >news:8g3_g.25132$...
    >>
    >> Woops.
    >>
    >> Computer should be switched off, and turned off at the wall socket.
    >>
    >> But the power cable should be kept plugged in, so that the computer case
    >> is
    >> still connected to Earth, and you should touch a bare metal part of the
    >> case
    >> frequently to discharge Static from yourself.
    >>
    >> Roy G
    >>

    >
    >I wouldn't recomend that with most computers made in the last five years or
    >so! The motherboard is activly under power even though the On/Off switch
    >has been turned Off! They maintain power to the mother board so that
    >varuous automated processes can occur, such as remote power-on via network
    >interface cards, etc. You can confirm this on most systems by pulling the
    >side cover off, and looking for a really small green LED on the mother board
    >that will be on.
    >
    >If you just ground yourself to the metal case, that should be adiquate.
    >I've been doing that for over twenty five years without ever damaging any
    >parts.
    >
    >Bill Crocker
    >

    Bill,

    I think you need to re-read what Roy wrote. Your wiring must be
    dangerously unconventional if the PC is still powered when turned off at
    the wall socket.

    David
    --
    David Littlewood
    David Littlewood, Oct 20, 2006
    #12
  13. PeteD

    Gary C Guest

    "David Littlewood" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    >
    > I think you need to re-read what Roy wrote. Your wiring must be
    > dangerously unconventional if the PC is still powered when turned off at
    > the wall socket.


    Us yanks, have nothing on a wall socket to turn off.
    Gary C, Oct 21, 2006
    #13
  14. Gary C wrote:
    > "David Littlewood" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    >> I think you need to re-read what Roy wrote. Your wiring must be
    >> dangerously unconventional if the PC is still powered when turned off at
    >> the wall socket.

    >
    > Us yanks, have nothing on a wall socket to turn off.


    We who live in Yankee-land generally have switches on the wall that
    operate the wall sockets, as if it made a lot of diff.

    --
    lsmft
    John McWilliams, Oct 21, 2006
    #14
  15. PeteD

    Bill Funk Guest

    On Fri, 20 Oct 2006 22:59:04 -0700, John McWilliams
    <> wrote:

    >Gary C wrote:
    >> "David Littlewood" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>
    >>> I think you need to re-read what Roy wrote. Your wiring must be
    >>> dangerously unconventional if the PC is still powered when turned off at
    >>> the wall socket.

    >>
    >> Us yanks, have nothing on a wall socket to turn off.

    >
    >We who live in Yankee-land generally have switches on the wall that
    >operate the wall sockets, as if it made a lot of diff.


    I live in the US (is that "Yankee-land"?), and I know that in
    relatively recent homes (built in the last several decades?), there's
    a wall switch in most rooms that control one outlet (the 'light
    switch'), but only that one outlet.
    The rest of the outlets aren't wall-switch-controlled, to the best of
    my knowledge.
    Where are your wall switches trhat control your outlets?
    --
    Bill Funk
    replace "g" with "a"
    Bill Funk, Oct 21, 2006
    #15
  16. PeteD

    Gary C Guest

    "Bill Funk" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Fri, 20 Oct 2006 22:59:04 -0700, John McWilliams
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>Gary C wrote:
    >>> "David Littlewood" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>>
    >>>> I think you need to re-read what Roy wrote. Your wiring must be
    >>>> dangerously unconventional if the PC is still powered when turned off
    >>>> at
    >>>> the wall socket.
    >>>
    >>> Us yanks, have nothing on a wall socket to turn off.

    >>
    >>We who live in Yankee-land generally have switches on the wall that
    >>operate the wall sockets, as if it made a lot of diff.

    >
    > I live in the US (is that "Yankee-land"?), and I know that in
    > relatively recent homes (built in the last several decades?), there's
    > a wall switch in most rooms that control one outlet (the 'light
    > switch'), but only that one outlet.
    > The rest of the outlets aren't wall-switch-controlled, to the best of
    > my knowledge.
    > Where are your wall switches trhat control your outlets?
    > --
    > Bill Funk
    > replace "g" with "a"



    Bill, your point is correct, but *OUR* wall switches do not control
    outlets. The wall switch controls a junction box, in the ceiling,
    (99 out of 100 times) with a fixture on it. Our wall outlets, which we
    plug our 110V or 220V devices into, are continuously live at all times.

    The only switch we have to control wall outlets is within
    our fuse / breaker panels, at the main power line coming into the home
    because wall outlets are most often a long run of wiring, ergo, every
    wall outlet in a room(s) is connected together in series.

    Perhaps us Yankee Doodles use different terms than the UK, i.e. wall socket?
    Maybe the Britts plug their computers into their ceilings?
    After all, we do not call our car fenders, wings!
    Gary C, Oct 22, 2006
    #16
  17. Gary C wrote:
    > "Bill Funk" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> On Fri, 20 Oct 2006 22:59:04 -0700, John McWilliams
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Gary C wrote:
    >>>> "David Littlewood" <> wrote in message
    >>>> news:...
    >>>>
    >>>>> I think you need to re-read what Roy wrote. Your wiring must be
    >>>>> dangerously unconventional if the PC is still powered when turned off
    >>>>> at
    >>>>> the wall socket.
    >>>> Us yanks, have nothing on a wall socket to turn off.
    >>> We who live in Yankee-land generally have switches on the wall that
    >>> operate the wall sockets, as if it made a lot of diff.

    >> I live in the US (is that "Yankee-land"?), and I know that in
    >> relatively recent homes (built in the last several decades?), there's
    >> a wall switch in most rooms that control one outlet (the 'light
    >> switch'), but only that one outlet.
    >> The rest of the outlets aren't wall-switch-controlled, to the best of
    >> my knowledge.
    >> Where are your wall switches trhat control your outlets?


    Next to the doors. This house, which I am renting in No. Cal., is poorly
    wired. Most wall outlets are controlled by wall switches, but not all.
    Just too many. Or, more accurately, there are not enough outlets in toto.
    >
    > Bill, your point is correct, but *OUR* wall switches do not control
    > outlets. The wall switch controls a junction box, in the ceiling,
    > (99 out of 100 times) with a fixture on it. Our wall outlets, which we
    > plug our 110V or 220V devices into, are continuously live at all times.
    >
    > The only switch we have to control wall outlets is within
    > our fuse / breaker panels, at the main power line coming into the home
    > because wall outlets are most often a long run of wiring, ergo, every
    > wall outlet in a room(s) is connected together in series.
    >
    > Perhaps us Yankee Doodles use different terms than the UK, i.e. wall socket?
    > Maybe the Britts plug their computers into their ceilings?
    > After all, we do not call our car fenders, wings!
    >

    That'd be "we Yankee Doodles". And, yes, those rooms which have overhead
    fixtures are switched by a wall mount. My preference is to have several
    outlets, the bottom outlet of which is switched, and the top live.

    --
    John McWilliams
    John McWilliams, Oct 22, 2006
    #17
  18. PeteD

    Bill Funk Guest

    On Sun, 22 Oct 2006 04:12:44 GMT, "Gary C"
    <Clem_Kadiddlehopper@Crazy_Googinheimer.com> wrote:

    >
    >"Bill Funk" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> On Fri, 20 Oct 2006 22:59:04 -0700, John McWilliams
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>>Gary C wrote:
    >>>> "David Littlewood" <> wrote in message
    >>>> news:...
    >>>>
    >>>>> I think you need to re-read what Roy wrote. Your wiring must be
    >>>>> dangerously unconventional if the PC is still powered when turned off
    >>>>> at
    >>>>> the wall socket.
    >>>>
    >>>> Us yanks, have nothing on a wall socket to turn off.
    >>>
    >>>We who live in Yankee-land generally have switches on the wall that
    >>>operate the wall sockets, as if it made a lot of diff.

    >>
    >> I live in the US (is that "Yankee-land"?), and I know that in
    >> relatively recent homes (built in the last several decades?), there's
    >> a wall switch in most rooms that control one outlet (the 'light
    >> switch'), but only that one outlet.
    >> The rest of the outlets aren't wall-switch-controlled, to the best of
    >> my knowledge.
    >> Where are your wall switches trhat control your outlets?
    >> --
    >> Bill Funk
    >> replace "g" with "a"

    >
    >
    >Bill, your point is correct, but *OUR* wall switches do not control
    >outlets. The wall switch controls a junction box, in the ceiling,
    >(99 out of 100 times) with a fixture on it. Our wall outlets, which we
    >plug our 110V or 220V devices into, are continuously live at all times.


    In my house (and all recently built houses I've been in), in most
    rooms, there's a wall switch to control one outlet, into which is
    usually plugged a light.
    >
    >The only switch we have to control wall outlets is within
    >our fuse / breaker panels, at the main power line coming into the home
    >because wall outlets are most often a long run of wiring, ergo, every
    >wall outlet in a room(s) is connected together in series.
    >
    >Perhaps us Yankee Doodles use different terms than the UK, i.e. wall socket?
    >Maybe the Britts plug their computers into their ceilings?
    >After all, we do not call our car fenders, wings!
    >

    --
    Bill Funk
    replace "g" with "a"
    Bill Funk, Oct 22, 2006
    #18
  19. PeteD

    Frank ess Guest

    Gary C wrote:
    > "Bill Funk" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> On Fri, 20 Oct 2006 22:59:04 -0700, John McWilliams
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Gary C wrote:
    >>>> "David Littlewood" <> wrote in message
    >>>> news:...
    >>>>
    >>>>> I think you need to re-read what Roy wrote. Your wiring must be
    >>>>> dangerously unconventional if the PC is still powered when
    >>>>> turned
    >>>>> off at
    >>>>> the wall socket.
    >>>>
    >>>> Us yanks, have nothing on a wall socket to turn off.
    >>>
    >>> We who live in Yankee-land generally have switches on the wall
    >>> that
    >>> operate the wall sockets, as if it made a lot of diff.

    >>
    >> I live in the US (is that "Yankee-land"?), and I know that in
    >> relatively recent homes (built in the last several decades?),
    >> there's
    >> a wall switch in most rooms that control one outlet (the 'light
    >> switch'), but only that one outlet.
    >> The rest of the outlets aren't wall-switch-controlled, to the best
    >> of
    >> my knowledge.
    >> Where are your wall switches trhat control your outlets?
    >> --
    >> Bill Funk
    >> replace "g" with "a"

    >
    >
    > Bill, your point is correct, but *OUR* wall switches do not control
    > outlets. The wall switch controls a junction box, in the ceiling,
    > (99 out of 100 times) with a fixture on it. Our wall outlets, which
    > we
    > plug our 110V or 220V devices into, are continuously live at all
    > times.
    > The only switch we have to control wall outlets is within
    > our fuse / breaker panels, at the main power line coming into the
    > home
    > because wall outlets are most often a long run of wiring, ergo,
    > every
    > wall outlet in a room(s) is connected together in series.
    >
    > Perhaps us Yankee Doodles use different terms than the UK, i.e. wall
    > socket? Maybe the Britts plug their computers into their ceilings?
    > After all, we do not call our car fenders, wings!


    My built-in-1957-Southern-California [1]house has two switches in a
    wall-mounted panel four or so feet above the floor and just inside the
    front door: Number One controls the porch light; Number Two controls
    one of two outlets (sockets) in a panel a foot above the floor in the
    same wall as the switch panel. An incandescent floor or table lamp
    connected to the switched socket can be turned on from the entrance
    way.

    I remember a similar arrangement in two of a half-dozen houses I've
    lived in between 1943 and today. Not to say they weren't present, just
    that I remember the two clearly.

    --
    Frank ess

    [1] It's still here.
    Frank ess, Oct 22, 2006
    #19
  20. PeteD

    Doug Robbins Guest

    Photoshop has an unlimited appetite for RAM. I'm running 2GB and often times
    wish I had more.


    "PeteD" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I'm thinking of buying CS2 (I have PS6). I'm concerned about RAM
    > requirements. I have a 2.4GHz P4 with 512Mb RAM. I suspect a memory
    > upgrade may be tricky due to the age of the PC.
    >
    > Is anyone out there running CS2 on a similar spec machine?
    >
    > Also is it worth the upgrade from PS6. I like the look of the file
    > management stuff and I just got a D80 so I need a Raw converter too. I
    > understand Nikon Capture NX (other option) is really slow on a machine
    > like mine....
    >
    > Thanks for any feedback.
    > Cheers
    > Pete
    >
    Doug Robbins, Oct 24, 2006
    #20
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