Photos in bright sunlight

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Satish K, Aug 7, 2003.

  1. Satish K

    Satish K Guest

    Hi,

    I have Sony F717 and these days I end up taking photos mostly in afternoon
    when there is bright sunlight. Some of the photos I took seems like they
    might look better with less brightness/flare. I know that I can control that
    using a image editor software. But I want to know how can I control this
    while taking photos? Which is the filter I should use? What is the best
    filter that is compatible with Sony F717?

    Another question - how is it different to use filter than using "exposure
    compensation" function that is available in the camera? Even with filter on
    the lens, is there any value using Exposure compensation?

    Thanks,

    - Satish
    Satish K, Aug 7, 2003
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Satish K

    Todd Walker Guest

    In article <y6kYa.57526$>,
    says...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I have Sony F717 and these days I end up taking photos mostly in afternoon
    > when there is bright sunlight. Some of the photos I took seems like they
    > might look better with less brightness/flare. I know that I can control that
    > using a image editor software. But I want to know how can I control this
    > while taking photos? Which is the filter I should use? What is the best
    > filter that is compatible with Sony F717?


    You can control it to a degree with a neutral density filter, or
    polarizer but with either one, your lighting ratio between shadow and
    highlight is still going to be too large. You are either going to blow
    out the highlights or underexpose the shadows. There just isn't enough
    exposure latitude to correctly expose highlights and shadows on a bright
    sunny day. That's why overcast days are always better for taking
    pictures.

    > Another question - how is it different to use filter than using "exposure
    > compensation" function that is available in the camera? Even with filter on
    > the lens, is there any value using Exposure compensation?


    You're talking apples and oranges. The two have nothing to do with each
    other.

    --
    ________________________________
    Todd Walker
    http://twalker.d2g.com
    Canon 10D:
    http://twalker.d2g.com/canon10d
    My Digital Photography Weblog:
    http://twalker.d2g.com/dpblog.htm
    _________________________________
    Todd Walker, Aug 7, 2003
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Satish K

    JK Guest

    Todd Walker wrote:

    > In article <y6kYa.57526$>,
    > says...
    > > Hi,
    > >
    > > I have Sony F717 and these days I end up taking photos mostly in afternoon
    > > when there is bright sunlight. Some of the photos I took seems like they
    > > might look better with less brightness/flare. I know that I can control that
    > > using a image editor software. But I want to know how can I control this
    > > while taking photos? Which is the filter I should use? What is the best
    > > filter that is compatible with Sony F717?

    >
    > You can control it to a degree with a neutral density filter, or
    > polarizer but with either one, your lighting ratio between shadow and
    > highlight is still going to be too large. You are either going to blow
    > out the highlights or underexpose the shadows. There just isn't enough
    > exposure latitude to correctly expose highlights and shadows on a bright
    > sunny day. That's why overcast days are always better for taking
    > pictures.


    That is why many pros use relectors in bright sunlight to bounce some
    light into people's faces. Others use fill flash, but using large reflectors
    usually results in more natural looking images. If you don't want to buy
    some, you can make your own using cardboard and aluminum foil.
    You may need an assistant to hold and aim the reflectors.

    >
    >
    > > Another question - how is it different to use filter than using "exposure
    > > compensation" function that is available in the camera? Even with filter on
    > > the lens, is there any value using Exposure compensation?

    >
    > You're talking apples and oranges. The two have nothing to do with each
    > other.
    >
    > --
    > ________________________________
    > Todd Walker
    > http://twalker.d2g.com
    > Canon 10D:
    > http://twalker.d2g.com/canon10d
    > My Digital Photography Weblog:
    > http://twalker.d2g.com/dpblog.htm
    > _________________________________
    JK, Aug 7, 2003
    #3
  4. Satish K

    Charlie Self Guest

    Todd Walker responds:

    >That is why many pros use relectors in bright sunlight to bounce some
    >light into people's faces. Others use fill flash, but using large reflectors
    >usually results in more natural looking images. If you don't want to buy
    >some, you can make your own using cardboard and aluminum foil.
    >You may need an assistant to hold and aim the reflectors.


    Mylar works extremely well, too, and is easier to get in wide sizes...check out
    Space Blankets if you can't find a local source of the film.

    Charlie Self

    "The California crunch really is the result of not enough power-generating
    plants and then not enough power to power the power of generating plants."
    George W. Bush
    Charlie Self, Aug 7, 2003
    #4
  5. Satish K

    Mxsmanic Guest

    Satish K writes:

    > Some of the photos I took seems like they might look better
    > with less brightness/flare. I know that I can control that
    > using a image editor software.


    Flare cannot be removed in post production, because it produces a
    permanent loss of image information at the time of capture.

    --
    Transpose hotmail and mxsmanic in my e-mail address to reach me directly.
    Mxsmanic, Aug 7, 2003
    #5
  6. leah (Charlie Self) wrote in message news:<>...
    > Todd Walker responds:
    >
    > >That is why many pros use relectors in bright sunlight to bounce some
    > >light into people's faces. Others use fill flash, but using large reflectors
    > >usually results in more natural looking images. If you don't want to buy
    > >some, you can make your own using cardboard and aluminum foil.
    > >You may need an assistant to hold and aim the reflectors.

    >
    > Mylar works extremely well, too, and is easier to get in wide sizes...check out
    > Space Blankets if you can't find a local source of the film.
    >
    > Charlie Self
    >
    > "The California crunch really is the result of not enough power-generating
    > plants and then not enough power to power the power of generating plants."
    > George W. Bush


    Oh, my goodness, Charlie Self voted for Algore! Dumb for the dumber!
    Why else would he try to humiliate GWB?? The power to power the power
    means natural gas, coal, oil, etc. Very simple. And guess who's butt
    may not be around today if ALGORE were in office. He'd say, "Let's
    make nice with Osama", "Give peace a chance". And..."If we don't
    respond in kind, maybe he'll go away?"
    Michael P Gabriel, Aug 7, 2003
    #6
  7. Satish K

    Patrick L. Guest

    JK <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    >
    > Todd Walker wrote:
    >
    > > In article <y6kYa.57526$>,
    > > says...
    > > > Hi,
    > > >
    > > > I have Sony F717 and these days I end up taking photos mostly in

    afternoon
    > > > when there is bright sunlight. Some of the photos I took seems like

    they
    > > > might look better with less brightness/flare. I know that I can

    control that
    > > > using a image editor software. But I want to know how can I control

    this
    > > > while taking photos? Which is the filter I should use? What is the

    best
    > > > filter that is compatible with Sony F717?

    > >
    > > You can control it to a degree with a neutral density filter, or
    > > polarizer but with either one, your lighting ratio between shadow and
    > > highlight is still going to be too large. You are either going to blow
    > > out the highlights or underexpose the shadows. There just isn't enough
    > > exposure latitude to correctly expose highlights and shadows on a bright
    > > sunny day. That's why overcast days are always better for taking
    > > pictures.

    >
    > That is why many pros use relectors in bright sunlight to bounce some
    > light into people's faces. Others use fill flash, but using large

    reflectors
    > usually results in more natural looking images. If you don't want to buy
    > some, you can make your own using cardboard and aluminum foil.
    > You may need an assistant to hold and aim the reflectors.
    >
    > >



    White foam board is going to be better than aluminum foil, which will be way
    too bright, causing the subjects to squint even more.

    Patrick
    Patrick L., Aug 7, 2003
    #7
  8. Satish K

    jeff liss Guest

    "Satish K" <> wrote in message news:<y6kYa.57526$>...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I have Sony F717 and these days I end up taking photos mostly in afternoon
    > when there is bright sunlight. Some of the photos I took seems like they
    > might look better with less brightness/flare. I know that I can control that
    > using a image editor software. But I want to know how can I control this
    > while taking photos? Which is the filter I should use? What is the best
    > filter that is compatible with Sony F717?
    >
    > Another question - how is it different to use filter than using "exposure
    > compensation" function that is available in the camera? Even with filter on
    > the lens, is there any value using Exposure compensation?
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > - Satish


    When shooting in bright sunlight, I go to manual exposure, expose for
    18% gray (grass works good), and use that setting for the entire
    scene. I'm not sure what the latitude is for digital, but the shadows
    and highlights will be lost a little. The majority of the scene should
    be correctly exposed. I used to shoot Kodachrome 64 exclusively. The
    +/- of that film is about 1/3 stop, so I do the same with digital and
    have had good results.
    jeff liss, Aug 7, 2003
    #8
  9. Satish K

    Rafe B. Guest

    On Thu, 07 Aug 2003 10:48:53 +0200, Mxsmanic <>
    wrote:

    >Satish K writes:
    >
    >> Some of the photos I took seems like they might look better
    >> with less brightness/flare. I know that I can control that
    >> using a image editor software.

    >
    >Flare cannot be removed in post production, because it produces a
    >permanent loss of image information at the time of capture.



    If the flare artifact shows up in a clear blue sky, and it's not
    too large, then it's easy to fix up in Photoshop.

    If you're defining flare as something that lowers the overall
    contrast of the lens, that's another matter.


    rafe b.
    http://www.terrapinphoto.com
    Rafe B., Aug 8, 2003
    #9
  10. (Satish K) writes:

    > I have Sony F717 and these days I end up taking photos mostly in afternoon
    > when there is bright sunlight. Some of the photos I took seems like they
    > might look better with less brightness/flare. I know that I can control that
    > using a image editor software. But I want to know how can I control this
    > while taking photos? Which is the filter I should use? What is the best
    > filter that is compatible with Sony F717?


    Does your camera have a low contrast setting? If you manage to record as
    much data as possible, you will have more to work with in your image
    editor.

    Fill flash is another way to improve unevenly lighted scenes, if you are
    close enough. Most on camera flashes won't compete with sunlight past
    about 10 feet.

    A polarizer will tame reflections, but won't do anything for light and
    shadow.

    --
    http://home.teleport.com/~larryc
    Larry Caldwell, Aug 8, 2003
    #10
  11. Satish K

    JK Guest

    It the shiny side of the foil is too bright, then use the dull side.

    "Patrick L." wrote:

    > JK <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > >
    > >
    > > Todd Walker wrote:
    > >
    > > > In article <y6kYa.57526$>,
    > > > says...
    > > > > Hi,
    > > > >
    > > > > I have Sony F717 and these days I end up taking photos mostly in

    > afternoon
    > > > > when there is bright sunlight. Some of the photos I took seems like

    > they
    > > > > might look better with less brightness/flare. I know that I can

    > control that
    > > > > using a image editor software. But I want to know how can I control

    > this
    > > > > while taking photos? Which is the filter I should use? What is the

    > best
    > > > > filter that is compatible with Sony F717?
    > > >
    > > > You can control it to a degree with a neutral density filter, or
    > > > polarizer but with either one, your lighting ratio between shadow and
    > > > highlight is still going to be too large. You are either going to blow
    > > > out the highlights or underexpose the shadows. There just isn't enough
    > > > exposure latitude to correctly expose highlights and shadows on a bright
    > > > sunny day. That's why overcast days are always better for taking
    > > > pictures.

    > >
    > > That is why many pros use relectors in bright sunlight to bounce some
    > > light into people's faces. Others use fill flash, but using large

    > reflectors
    > > usually results in more natural looking images. If you don't want to buy
    > > some, you can make your own using cardboard and aluminum foil.
    > > You may need an assistant to hold and aim the reflectors.
    > >
    > > >

    >
    > White foam board is going to be better than aluminum foil, which will be way
    > too bright, causing the subjects to squint even more.
    >
    > Patrick
    JK, Aug 8, 2003
    #11
  12. Satish K

    Patrick L. Guest

    Mxsmanic <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > Satish K writes:
    >
    > > Some of the photos I took seems like they might look better
    > > with less brightness/flare. I know that I can control that
    > > using a image editor software.

    >
    > Flare cannot be removed in post production, because it produces a
    > permanent loss of image information at the time of capture.




    Depends on how much, and where on the photo, I have removed a modest
    amount, easily, in PhotoShop.


    Patrick
    Patrick L., Aug 10, 2003
    #12
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Phil
    Replies:
    14
    Views:
    729
  2. Bert Hyman

    Canon A60 rendered unuseable by sunlight

    Bert Hyman, Sep 30, 2003, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    315
    Buster
    Oct 2, 2003
  3. Replies:
    0
    Views:
    452
  4. Wayne

    All electronic viewfinders bad in bright sunlight?

    Wayne, May 2, 2004, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    9
    Views:
    756
    stewy
    May 4, 2004
  5. vj
    Replies:
    28
    Views:
    2,262
    ratatule
    Mar 31, 2011
Loading...

Share This Page