Photography tips for Borneo?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Kulvinder Singh Matharu, Feb 3, 2008.

  1. Thanks for all the tips you all gave for my trip to Antarctica last
    December.

    I'm now off to (Malaysian) Borneo next month (mid March) and will be
    undertaking various activities such as mountain biking, jungle
    trekking, bamboo rafting, canopy walks, etc.

    There will be some opportunities for dedicated transport for our
    luggage (such as when cycling) but I am keen to keep everything to a
    minimum as I will be carrying most of my gear especially for the
    treks through the jungle.

    My normal camera gear are:

    Canon 40D

    10-22mm f3.5-4.5 USM EF-S (just purchased this)

    16-35mm f2.8 L USM

    28-135mm f3.5-5.6 IS USM

    70-200m f2.8 L IS USM

    70-300m f4-5.6 IS USM

    Canon 1.4x Teleconvertor

    580EX E-TTL II Flash

    Epson P5000

    Velba Sherpa lightweight tripod

    Gitso carbon-fibre tripod

    I normally also carry various battery chargers, filters, lens hoods,
    power socket adapters, etc.

    This is a lot to carry especially if I carry my spare Canon 30D
    camera.

    Will I need external flash?

    I will leave the Gitso behind as the Velba seems to be quite capable
    for this trip.

    As per my Antarctica trip, I'll probably leave the 70-200mm f2.8 L IS
    USM lens behind as weight is even more of a problem on this trip! I
    may get a Kenko 1.4 Teleconvertor for some of the jungle shots but
    I'll likely need to manual focus (I can live with that).

    What are the minimum set of lenses I'll need for the trip? With the
    new 10-22mm lens I'll likely leave behind the 16-35mm lens so that
    with save on a lot of weight.

    (It's almost got to the point that I don't use the L lenses anymore!)

    For this trip, in particular, the following have been recommended to
    me:

    Sunscreen
    Sunglasses
    Hat (I've got a Tilly hat so will use that!)
    Insect repellent
    First aid kit
    Mosquito net
    Sleeping bag liner
    Torch
    Boots, trainers and sandals
    Leech socks
    Holdall
    Long sleeved shirt
    Long trousers
    Light-weight mac
    Swimwear

    I really, really do not want to take too much with me so am looking
    at reducing the camera-related gear.

    Should I buy a bunch of 8GB memory cards and not take the Epson
    P5000?

    Should I purchase one of those plastic waterproof covers for my
    camera for rafting?

    Should I get a small point-and-shoot camera as a spare rather than
    using the 30D as the spare?

    I'm likely to be without electricity for several days at a time so am
    likely to purchase additional batteries for the camera...which does
    tend me to look at getting memory cards rather than using the Epson
    P5000.

    Also, are there any photographic tips that you can provide about
    shooting in the jungle, with subjects such as birds, orangutans, etc?

    What sort of rucksack would you recommend? I've already seen the need
    for float bags for keeping my gear dry in the event of falling into
    the river! I don't think that I'm keen on the Lowe waterproof
    bags...they're just so difficult to open/close and I know one person
    who had managed to damage the waterproof closure mechanism. I'd
    rather use a floatbag inside a rucksack.

    Anyway just some thoughts and ramblings, but I'd appreciate any
    advice.

    Just need to check my vaccinations and anti-Malarial medications now!

    Regards,

    --
    Kulvinder Singh Matharu

    Website : www.metalvortex.com
    Contact : www.metalvortex.com/contact/

    Brain! Brain! What is brain?!
     
    Kulvinder Singh Matharu, Feb 3, 2008
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Kulvinder Singh Matharu

    TH O Guest

    In article <>,
    Kulvinder Singh Matharu <> wrote:

    > I'm now off to (Malaysian) Borneo next month (mid March) and will be
    > undertaking various activities such as mountain biking, jungle
    > trekking, bamboo rafting, canopy walks, etc.


    I've never been to Malaysia but my backpacking experience says to keep
    your camera gear as light as possible. 2 or 3 lenses would do.

    > My normal camera gear are:
    >
    > Canon 40D
    >
    > 10-22mm f3.5-4.5 USM EF-S (just purchased this)
    >
    > 16-35mm f2.8 L USM
    >
    > 28-135mm f3.5-5.6 IS USM
    >
    > 70-200m f2.8 L IS USM
    >
    > 70-300m f4-5.6 IS USM
    >
    > Canon 1.4x Teleconvertor
    >
    > 580EX E-TTL II Flash
    >
    > Epson P5000
    >
    > Velba Sherpa lightweight tripod
    >
    > Gitso carbon-fibre tripod
    >


    > For this trip, in particular, the following have been recommended to
    > me:
    >
    > Sunscreen
    > Sunglasses


    Add straps on the ends to hold them on during rafting tumbles and during
    biking and hiking.

    > Hat (I've got a Tilly hat so will use that!)
    > Insect repellent
    > First aid kit
    > Mosquito net
    > Sleeping bag liner


    Are you going up any colder mountains?

    Also need sleeping pad.

    > Torch


    Could try LED ... you may not need to replace the battery once on the
    trip.

    > Boots, trainers and sandals
    > Leech socks
    > Holdall
    > Long sleeved shirt
    > Long trousers


    zip-off nylon. Will dry overnight if you wash before bed.

    > Light-weight mac


    Macintosh computer? Too heavy.

    > Swimwear


    Water filter!

    > What sort of rucksack would you recommend? I've already seen the need
    > for float bags for keeping my gear dry in the event of falling into
    > the river! I don't think that I'm keen on the Lowe waterproof
    > bags...they're just so difficult to open/close and I know one person
    > who had managed to damage the waterproof closure mechanism. I'd
    > rather use a floatbag inside a rucksack.


    If you put the lens in a floatbag you'll need padded covers around the
    lenses to keep them safe from bumps and bangs, especially during a
    capsize.
     
    TH O, Feb 3, 2008
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Kulvinder Singh Matharu

    Paul Furman Guest

    Kulvinder Singh Matharu wrote:
    >
    > I'm now off to (Malaysian) Borneo next month



    Sounds fun. Here's what I would bring:

    > Canon 40D
    > 10-22mm f3.5-4.5 USM EF-S
    > 70-200m f2.8 L IS USM
    > 1.4x Teleconvertor
    > lightweight tripod
    >
    >
    > (It's almost got to the point that I don't use the L lenses anymore!)


    I would rather 2 good lenses than a few. It doesn't hurt to be missing
    some of the middle range.

    > buy a bunch of 8GB memory cards
    >
    > get a small point-and-shoot camera as a spare rather than
    > using the 30D as the spare


    Maybe if the 30D stays in the bottom of the suitcase but not out hiking
    every day, right?
     
    Paul Furman, Feb 3, 2008
    #3
  4. Kulvinder Singh Matharu

    Alfred Molon Guest

    I've travelled extensively across Malaysian Borneo over the years - you
    can see my photos in the Malaysia section of my molon.de site.

    Don't carry tons of stuff with you, especially if you are planning to do
    trekking in the jungle. Every Kg matters.

    I've climbed three times Mt Kinabalu and for that I only brought with me
    the camera, enough batteries, enough memory cards and a light tripod
    (and of course a polariser filter was mounted on the camera).

    You'll obviously need some long lens (and a tripod) in case you are
    planning to photograph wildlife.

    Very important is to have a very good mosquito repellent. The one they
    sell here in Germany (Autan) is perfect. The ones they sell locally in
    Malaysia don't work (at least not the ones I have tried).

    And lastly you don't need any fancy gear. Two lenses could suffice - an
    zoom, for instance 24-120 (35mm equiv) and a telezoom for the wildlife
    shots.
    --

    Alfred Molon
    ------------------------------
    Olympus 50X0, 8080, E3X0, E4X0, E5X0 and E3 forum at
    http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/MyOlympus/
    http://myolympus.org/ photo sharing site
     
    Alfred Molon, Feb 3, 2008
    #4
  5. Kulvinder Singh Matharu

    Toby Guest

    I've been to Borneo a couple of times. I found it much less interesting
    photographically than I had expected, with the exception of Mt. Kinabalu. If
    you go to the orang sanctuaries you will need a very long lens, as tourists
    are kept well back from the animals, which are in a quite artificial setting
    (feeding platform, ropes, etc.)

    Toby
     
    Toby, Feb 4, 2008
    #5
  6. Kulvinder Singh Matharu

    Alfred Molon Guest

    In article <47a68f6a$0$242$>, Toby says...
    > If
    > you go to the orang sanctuaries you will need a very long lens, as tourists
    > are kept well back from the animals, which are in a quite artificial setting
    > (feeding platform, ropes, etc.)


    Well no, these shots were taken with a 35-105 zoom:
    http://www.molon.de/galleries/Malaysia/Sabah/Sepilok/
    --

    Alfred Molon
    ------------------------------
    Olympus 50X0, 8080, E3X0, E4X0, E5X0 and E3 forum at
    http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/MyOlympus/
    http://myolympus.org/ photo sharing site
     
    Alfred Molon, Feb 4, 2008
    #6
  7. Kulvinder Singh Matharu

    Toby Guest

    "Alfred Molon" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In article <47a68f6a$0$242$>, Toby says...
    >> If
    >> you go to the orang sanctuaries you will need a very long lens, as
    >> tourists
    >> are kept well back from the animals, which are in a quite artificial
    >> setting
    >> (feeding platform, ropes, etc.)

    >
    > Well no, these shots were taken with a 35-105 zoom:
    > http://www.molon.de/galleries/Malaysia/Sabah/Sepilok/


    I meant if you are trying to make it look like they are in the wild, i.e.,
    excluding all the man-made stuff. You were lucky to have an animal so close
    to the trail. That isn't always the case. We had two young ones playing on
    the boardwalk, but we were not allowed to stop and take pictures.

    Toby
     
    Toby, Feb 4, 2008
    #7
  8. ? "Alfred Molon" <> ?????? ??? ??????
    news:...
    > In article <47a68f6a$0$242$>, Toby says...
    > > If
    > > you go to the orang sanctuaries you will need a very long lens, as

    tourists
    > > are kept well back from the animals, which are in a quite artificial

    setting
    > > (feeding platform, ropes, etc.)

    >
    > Well no, these shots were taken with a 35-105 zoom:
    > http://www.molon.de/galleries/Malaysia/Sabah/Sepilok/
    > --
    >

    Sehr gute Fotos, bravo:)
    The most exotic plave I've ever been is Germany, and Austria.I also seem to
    prefer cats to orange utans.Meeeow!




    --
    Tzortzakakis Dimitrios
    major in electrical engineering
    mechanized infantry reservist
    hordad AT otenet DOT gr
     
    Tzortzakakis Dimitrios, Feb 4, 2008
    #8
  9. On Sun, 03 Feb 2008 10:36:45 -0500, TH O <tho@tho.23.invalid> wrote:
    [snip]
    >I've never been to Malaysia but my backpacking experience says to keep
    >your camera gear as light as possible. 2 or 3 lenses would do.


    I'm tending to think that way too.

    [snip]
    >Add straps on the ends to hold them on during rafting tumbles and during
    >biking and hiking.


    That's a good idea!

    >> Hat (I've got a Tilly hat so will use that!)
    >> Insect repellent
    >> First aid kit
    >> Mosquito net
    >> Sleeping bag liner

    >
    >Are you going up any colder mountains?


    No, but a sleeping bag liner on its own should be ideal to use in a
    hot climate, I think!

    >Also need sleeping pad.


    Sure.

    >> Torch

    >
    >Could try LED ... you may not need to replace the battery once on the
    >trip.


    Thanks. I got one of those, a StormLight. Bought one in 2006, and
    it's still got the original set of batteries in it and still going
    strong. Will get new set of batteries anyway!

    >> Boots, trainers and sandals
    >> Leech socks
    >> Holdall
    >> Long sleeved shirt
    >> Long trousers

    >
    >zip-off nylon. Will dry overnight if you wash before bed.


    OK.

    >> Light-weight mac

    >
    >Macintosh computer? Too heavy.


    Funny :) Raincoat!

    >> Swimwear

    >
    >Water filter!


    OK. I was told to bring water purifier tablets. Would that be used
    with the water filter or instead of the water filter?

    [snip]
    >If you put the lens in a floatbag you'll need padded covers around the
    >lenses to keep them safe from bumps and bangs, especially during a
    >capsize.


    Another good idea.

    Everyone else, thanks for all the tips. I'll also take some silica
    gel as I think I'm going to get quite wet!

    --
    Kulvinder Singh Matharu

    Website : www.metalvortex.com
    Contact : www.metalvortex.com/contact/

    Brain! Brain! What is brain?!
     
    Kulvinder Singh Matharu, Feb 5, 2008
    #9
  10. Kulvinder Singh Matharu

    TH O Guest

    In article <>,
    Kulvinder Singh Matharu <> wrote:

    > On Sun, 03 Feb 2008 10:36:45 -0500, TH O <tho@tho.23.invalid> wrote:
    > [snip]
    > >I've never been to Malaysia but my backpacking experience says to keep
    > >your camera gear as light as possible. 2 or 3 lenses would do.

    >
    > I'm tending to think that way too.
    >
    > [snip]
    > >Add straps on the ends to hold them on during rafting tumbles and during
    > >biking and hiking.

    >
    > That's a good idea!
    >
    > >> Hat (I've got a Tilly hat so will use that!)
    > >> Insect repellent
    > >> First aid kit
    > >> Mosquito net
    > >> Sleeping bag liner

    > >
    > >Are you going up any colder mountains?

    >
    > No, but a sleeping bag liner on its own should be ideal to use in a
    > hot climate, I think!
    >
    > >Also need sleeping pad.

    >
    > Sure.
    >
    > >> Torch

    > >
    > >Could try LED ... you may not need to replace the battery once on the
    > >trip.

    >
    > Thanks. I got one of those, a StormLight. Bought one in 2006, and
    > it's still got the original set of batteries in it and still going
    > strong. Will get new set of batteries anyway!


    Those LEDs sure are a great device for backpacking lights. I swear by
    them.

    > >> Boots, trainers and sandals
    > >> Leech socks
    > >> Holdall
    > >> Long sleeved shirt
    > >> Long trousers

    > >
    > >zip-off nylon. Will dry overnight if you wash before bed.

    >
    > OK.
    >
    > >> Light-weight mac

    > >
    > >Macintosh computer? Too heavy.

    >
    > Funny :) Raincoat!


    See what happens when we try to interpret words used differently in
    different countries! :)

    > >> Swimwear

    > >
    > >Water filter!

    >
    > OK. I was told to bring water purifier tablets. Would that be used
    > with the water filter or instead of the water filter?


    I use pur aqua tablets in the US. But I seem to recall that they don't
    work for some small but deadly viruses. Come to think of it, there is
    some distinction between water "filters" and water "purifiers" regarding
    which can remove high level viruses. It might be a good idea to read up
    on some of this stuff on http://www.katadyn.com where they know a lot
    more than me.

    > [snip]
    > >If you put the lens in a floatbag you'll need padded covers around the
    > >lenses to keep them safe from bumps and bangs, especially during a
    > >capsize.

    >
    > Another good idea.


    I have some no-name pouches but I hear http://www.optechusa.com/
    recommended by others.

    > Everyone else, thanks for all the tips. I'll also take some silica
    > gel as I think I'm going to get quite wet!


    Good luck!
     
    TH O, Feb 6, 2008
    #10
  11. On Feb 3, 8:31 am, Kulvinder Singh Matharu <real-address-
    > wrote:
    > Thanks for all the tips you all gave for my trip to Antarctica last
    > December.
    >
    > I'm now off to (Malaysian) Borneo next month (mid March) and will be
    > undertaking various activities such as mountain biking, jungle
    > trekking, bamboo rafting, canopy walks, etc.
    >


    > Canon 40D
    >
    > 10-22mm f3.5-4.5 USM EF-S (just purchased this)
    >
    > 16-35mm f2.8 L USM
    >
    > 28-135mm f3.5-5.6 IS USM
    >
    > 70-200m f2.8 L IS USM
    >
    > 70-300m f4-5.6 IS USM
    >
    > Canon 1.4x Teleconvertor
    >
    > 580EX E-TTL II Flash
    >
    > Epson P5000
    >
    > Velba Sherpa lightweight tripod
    >
    > Gitso carbon-fibre tripod
    >
    > I normally also carry various battery chargers, filters, lens hoods,
    > power socket adapters, etc.
    >
    > This is a lot to carry especially if I carry my spare Canon 30D
    > camera.
    >
    > Will I need external flash?
    >
    > I will leave the Gitso behind as the Velba seems to be quite capable
    > for this trip.
    >
    > As per my Antarctica trip, I'll probably leave the 70-200mm f2.8 L IS
    > USM lens behind as weight is even more of a problem on this trip! I
    > may get a Kenko 1.4 Teleconvertor for some of the jungle shots but
    > I'll likely need to manual focus (I can live with that).
    >
    > What are the minimum set of lenses I'll need for the trip? With the
    > new 10-22mm lens I'll likely leave behind the 16-35mm lens so that
    > with save on a lot of weight.
    >
    > (It's almost got to the point that I don't use the L lenses anymore!)
    >
    > For this trip, in particular, the following have been recommended to
    > me:
    >
    > Sunscreen
    > Sunglasses
    > Hat (I've got a Tilly hat so will use that!)
    > Insect repellent
    > First aid kit
    > Mosquito net
    > Sleeping bag liner
    > Torch
    > Boots, trainers and sandals
    > Leech socks
    > Holdall
    > Long sleeved shirt
    > Long trousers
    > Light-weight mac
    > Swimwear
    >
    > I really, really do not want to take too much with me so am looking
    > at reducing the camera-related gear.
    >
    > Should I buy a bunch of 8GB memory cards and not take the Epson
    > P5000?
    >
    > Should I purchase one of those plastic waterproof covers for my
    > camera for rafting?
    >
    > Should I get a small point-and-shoot camera as a spare rather than
    > using the 30D as the spare?
    >
    > I'm likely to be without electricity for several days at a time so am
    > likely to purchase additional batteries for the camera...which does
    > tend me to look at getting memory cards rather than using the Epson
    > P5000.
    >
    > Also, are there any photographic tips that you can provide about
    > shooting in the jungle, with subjects such as birds, orangutans, etc?
    >
    > What sort of rucksack would you recommend? I've already seen the need
    > for float bags for keeping my gear dry in the event of falling into
    > the river! I don't think that I'm keen on the Lowe waterproof
    > bags...they're just so difficult to open/close and I know one person
    > who had managed to damage the waterproof closure mechanism. I'd
    > rather use a floatbag inside a rucksack.
    >
    > Anyway just some thoughts and ramblings, but I'd appreciate any
    > advice.
    >
    > Just need to check my vaccinations and anti-Malarial medications now!
    >
    > Regards,
    >
    > --
    > Kulvinder Singh Matharu


    Take LOTS of batteries. Get at least another body and leave lenses
    attached to all of them permanently. Take the point and shoot too.
    In the jungle you will be wet and in a constant cloud of insects. If
    you change lenses outside, there will be critters on your sensor and
    in your lenses and water everywhere. The insect repellent will eat
    plastic. Frans Lanting wrote an article a few years ago in
    Shutterbug about a trip to Borneo. It's worth finding the back
    issue. As I recall, he killed 12 pro 35mm bodies in three weeks.

    Unless you have a really experienced guide, don't go anywhere near the
    orangutans...and watch where you step.

    Remember what they say about adventures... and have fun.
    Bob Kirkpatrick
     
    Bob Kirkpatrick, Feb 7, 2008
    #11
  12. Kulvinder Singh Matharu

    Guest

    ah, Borneo... delightful scenery there... however, you'll likely find
    that
    its more important how you approach your photography there, than
    what equipment you take... yes, its all in the approach.
    First, Id suggest an armored land rover, and, a few... errr...
    assistants.
    After locating a good photo site, let one assistant out, then quickly
    lock
    the door... watch your assistant carefully... if they return in one
    piece
    after an hour or so, let them in, and make small talk. If you happen
    to see your assistant struggling from the forest with a spear in their
    back, well... thats what the assistants are for ! :)
     
    , Feb 7, 2008
    #12
  13. On Thu, 7 Feb 2008 08:51:51 -0800 (PST), Bob Kirkpatrick
    <> wrote:

    [snip]
    >Take LOTS of batteries. Get at least another body and leave lenses
    >attached to all of them permanently. Take the point and shoot too.
    >In the jungle you will be wet and in a constant cloud of insects. If
    >you change lenses outside, there will be critters on your sensor and
    >in your lenses and water everywhere. The insect repellent will eat
    >plastic. Frans Lanting wrote an article a few years ago in
    >Shutterbug about a trip to Borneo. It's worth finding the back
    >issue. As I recall, he killed 12 pro 35mm bodies in three weeks.


    I'll have a search. Not sure we get that mag in the UK.

    >Unless you have a really experienced guide, don't go anywhere near the
    >orangutans...and watch where you step.


    Understood!

    >Remember what they say about adventures... and have fun.
    >Bob Kirkpatrick


    Thanks very much :)

    --
    Kulvinder Singh Matharu

    Website : www.metalvortex.com
    Contact : www.metalvortex.com/contact/

    Brain! Brain! What is brain?!
     
    Kulvinder Singh Matharu, Feb 7, 2008
    #13
  14. Kulvinder Singh Matharu

    Alfred Molon Guest

    In article <bdc5e568-bb74-4731-a92b-
    >, Bob Kirkpatrick says...

    > Take LOTS of batteries.


    Nonsense. Two, max. three sets of batteries and a charger will be more
    than sufficient. Today's cameras have a very long battery life. With my
    current camera I'm unable to empty *one* set of batteries on a very good
    day.
    --

    Alfred Molon
    ------------------------------
    Olympus 50X0, 8080, E3X0, E4X0, E5X0 and E3 forum at
    http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/MyOlympus/
    http://myolympus.org/ photo sharing site
     
    Alfred Molon, Feb 7, 2008
    #14
  15. Kulvinder Singh Matharu

    news@anu Guest

    Bob Kirkpatrick wrote:
    > On Feb 3, 8:31 am, Kulvinder Singh Matharu <real-address-
    > > wrote:
    >> Thanks for all the tips you all gave for my trip to Antarctica last
    >> December.
    >>
    >> I'm now off to (Malaysian) Borneo next month (mid March) and will be
    >> undertaking various activities such as mountain biking, jungle
    >> trekking, bamboo rafting, canopy walks, etc.
    >>

    >
    >> Canon 40D
    >>
    >> 10-22mm f3.5-4.5 USM EF-S (just purchased this)
    >>
    >> 16-35mm f2.8 L USM
    >>
    >> 28-135mm f3.5-5.6 IS USM
    >>
    >> 70-200m f2.8 L IS USM
    >>
    >> 70-300m f4-5.6 IS USM
    >>
    >> Canon 1.4x Teleconvertor
    >>
    >> 580EX E-TTL II Flash
    >>
    >> Epson P5000
    >>
    >> Velba Sherpa lightweight tripod
    >>
    >> Gitso carbon-fibre tripod
    >>
    >> I normally also carry various battery chargers, filters, lens hoods,
    >> power socket adapters, etc.
    >>
    >> This is a lot to carry especially if I carry my spare Canon 30D
    >> camera.
    >>
    >> Will I need external flash?
    >>
    >> I will leave the Gitso behind as the Velba seems to be quite capable
    >> for this trip.
    >>
    >> As per my Antarctica trip, I'll probably leave the 70-200mm f2.8 L IS
    >> USM lens behind as weight is even more of a problem on this trip! I
    >> may get a Kenko 1.4 Teleconvertor for some of the jungle shots but
    >> I'll likely need to manual focus (I can live with that).
    >>
    >> What are the minimum set of lenses I'll need for the trip? With the
    >> new 10-22mm lens I'll likely leave behind the 16-35mm lens so that
    >> with save on a lot of weight.
    >>
    >> (It's almost got to the point that I don't use the L lenses anymore!)
    >>
    >> For this trip, in particular, the following have been recommended to
    >> me:
    >>
    >> Sunscreen
    >> Sunglasses
    >> Hat (I've got a Tilly hat so will use that!)
    >> Insect repellent
    >> First aid kit
    >> Mosquito net
    >> Sleeping bag liner
    >> Torch
    >> Boots, trainers and sandals
    >> Leech socks
    >> Holdall
    >> Long sleeved shirt
    >> Long trousers
    >> Light-weight mac
    >> Swimwear
    >>
    >> I really, really do not want to take too much with me so am looking
    >> at reducing the camera-related gear.
    >>
    >> Should I buy a bunch of 8GB memory cards and not take the Epson
    >> P5000?
    >>
    >> Should I purchase one of those plastic waterproof covers for my
    >> camera for rafting?
    >>
    >> Should I get a small point-and-shoot camera as a spare rather than
    >> using the 30D as the spare?
    >>
    >> I'm likely to be without electricity for several days at a time so am
    >> likely to purchase additional batteries for the camera...which does
    >> tend me to look at getting memory cards rather than using the Epson
    >> P5000.
    >>
    >> Also, are there any photographic tips that you can provide about
    >> shooting in the jungle, with subjects such as birds, orangutans, etc?
    >>
    >> What sort of rucksack would you recommend? I've already seen the need
    >> for float bags for keeping my gear dry in the event of falling into
    >> the river! I don't think that I'm keen on the Lowe waterproof
    >> bags...they're just so difficult to open/close and I know one person
    >> who had managed to damage the waterproof closure mechanism. I'd
    >> rather use a floatbag inside a rucksack.
    >>
    >> Anyway just some thoughts and ramblings, but I'd appreciate any
    >> advice.
    >>
    >> Just need to check my vaccinations and anti-Malarial medications now!
    >>
    >> Regards,
    >>
    >> --
    >> Kulvinder Singh Matharu

    >
    > Take LOTS of batteries. Get at least another body and leave lenses
    > attached to all of them permanently. Take the point and shoot too.
    > In the jungle you will be wet and in a constant cloud of insects. If
    > you change lenses outside, there will be critters on your sensor and
    > in your lenses and water everywhere. The insect repellent will eat
    > plastic. Frans Lanting wrote an article a few years ago in
    > Shutterbug about a trip to Borneo. It's worth finding the back
    > issue. As I recall, he killed 12 pro 35mm bodies in three weeks.
    >
    > Unless you have a really experienced guide, don't go anywhere near the
    > orangutans...and watch where you step.
    >
    > Remember what they say about adventures... and have fun.
    > Bob Kirkpatrick
    >
    >

    Those places of interest that you mentioned - they all have power to
    charge your batteries.

    Borneo is now a VERY civilized place - tons of tourists. Have been there
    many, many times.

    There are NO issues with changing lens, be it indoor or outdoor! (unless
    in the open rain or rafting!) I have NEVER lost/damanged any camera
    bodies whilst there! Just use common sense!

    Have fun.
     
    news@anu, Feb 11, 2008
    #15
  16. On Mon, 11 Feb 2008 14:51:42 +1100, "news@anu" <>
    wrote:

    [snip]
    >Those places of interest that you mentioned - they all have power to
    >charge your batteries.


    >Borneo is now a VERY civilized place - tons of tourists. Have been there
    >many, many times.
    >
    >There are NO issues with changing lens, be it indoor or outdoor! (unless
    > in the open rain or rafting!) I have NEVER lost/damanged any camera
    >bodies whilst there! Just use common sense!
    >
    >Have fun.


    Thanks. I'll have to see about pros and cons of taking extra
    batteries.

    --
    Kulvinder Singh Matharu

    Website : www.metalvortex.com
    Contact : www.metalvortex.com/contact/

    Brain! Brain! What is brain?!
     
    Kulvinder Singh Matharu, Feb 12, 2008
    #16
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