Photography In Space by Captain Alan Poindexter

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by David J Taylor, Apr 23, 2012.

  1. David J Taylor, Apr 23, 2012
    #1
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  2. David Dyer-Bennet, Apr 23, 2012
    #2
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  3. "Alfred Molon" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In article <jn2uk1$52l$>, David J Taylor says...
    >> Photography In Space by Captain Alan Poindexter
    >>
    >> See:
    >>
    >>
    >> http://www.luminous-landscape.com/locations/photography_in_space.shtml

    >
    > Looks like you need a high ISO camera like the Nikon D3s in that
    > environment, although lots of shots were also taken at lower ISO
    > settings.
    >
    > I assume the mirror in the DSLR falls down not due to gravity, but due
    > to a spring mechanism?
    >
    > And can you use a DSLR or other camera in space (outside where there is
    > no air, or will it fail due to radiation or lack of air?
    > --
    >
    > Alfred Molon


    Yes, a DSLR works quite happily in a zero-gravity environment, and outside
    (it's mentioned in the article). Hasselblads were, famously, used on the
    surface of the moon.

    Also mentioned (but possibly elsewhere is that the higher radiation level
    not only causes flashes in the eyes (up to twice a minute hen passing
    through the South Atlantic Anomaly), but also created faulty pixels in
    digital cameras. I guess they either have to run a pixel check/correction
    every so often, or recycle the cameras from time to time.

    Cheers,
    David
     
    David J Taylor, Apr 24, 2012
    #3
  4. David J Taylor

    Bruce Guest

    "David J Taylor" <> wrote:
    >Yes, a DSLR works quite happily in a zero-gravity environment, and outside
    >(it's mentioned in the article). Hasselblads were, famously, used on the
    >surface of the moon.



    Hasselblads were indeed used on the moon landings, but they were not
    SLRs. As part of the modifications of the cameras, the mirror
    mechanism and pentaprism were removed and a direct vision viewfinder
    was provided.

    The first Hasselblad SLR to be used in space was with the Apollo/Soyuz
    mission in 1975, three years after the last of the Apollo moon
    landings.
     
    Bruce, Apr 24, 2012
    #4
  5. David J Taylor

    Joe Makowiec Guest

    On 23 Apr 2012 in rec.photo.digital, Alfred Molon wrote:

    > I assume the mirror in the DSLR falls down not due to gravity, but due
    > to a spring mechanism?


    Since I can use my fairly basic dSLR - and other (d)SLRs going back four
    decades - in an inverted position here in 1 G, I'd have to assume that
    yes, they have a return spring.

    --
    Joe Makowiec
    http://makowiec.org/
    Email: http://makowiec.org/contact/?Joe
    Usenet Improvement Project: http://twovoyagers.com/improve-usenet.org/
     
    Joe Makowiec, Apr 24, 2012
    #5
  6. Alfred Molon <> writes:

    > In article <jn2uk1$52l$>, David J Taylor says...
    >> Photography In Space by Captain Alan Poindexter
    >>
    >> See:
    >>
    >> http://www.luminous-landscape.com/locations/photography_in_space.shtml

    >
    > Looks like you need a high ISO camera like the Nikon D3s in that
    > environment, although lots of shots were also taken at lower ISO
    > settings.


    Wide dynamic range is probably more important. He did amazingly well --
    but then, he had lots of specific training and is presumably a very
    bright person. And was interested in photography, it's not just a job
    added to his list for that flight.

    > I assume the mirror in the DSLR falls down not due to gravity, but due
    > to a spring mechanism?


    That's probably important even on earth; vertical format, and all that.
    Sometimes cameras even get mounted upside down.

    > And can you use a DSLR or other camera in space (outside where there is
    > no air, or will it fail due to radiation or lack of air)?


    They did send them outside, and the article mentions modifications, but
    mostly a heat blanket, and a big buttons so they can use it with the
    heavy gloves. He didn't detail changes for vacuum, but I think he
    mentioned them.
    --
    David Dyer-Bennet, ; http://dd-b.net/
    Snapshots: http://dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/data/
    Photos: http://dd-b.net/photography/gallery/
    Dragaera: http://dragaera.info
     
    David Dyer-Bennet, Apr 24, 2012
    #6
  7. David J Taylor

    Nick Fotis Guest

    I remember reading somewhere that NASA selected Nikon cameras because
    the Fluorite in Canon lenses is very brittle at extreme cold (= space)
    conditions.

    Also, I suppose they used the heat blanket (and an oversized shutter
    button) in order to combat the extreme cold (= batteries losing
    efficiency) and the oversized thumbs due to astronaut suits.

    N.F.
     
    Nick Fotis, Apr 25, 2012
    #7
  8. Nick Fotis <> wrote:
    > I remember reading somewhere that NASA selected Nikon cameras because
    > the Fluorite in Canon lenses is very brittle at extreme cold (= space)
    > conditions.


    Which "extreme cold" conditions would there be in LEO?

    Most of the time --- i.e. outside the Earth shadow --- you're in
    *full* sunlight, with no atmosphere to cool you (wind, convection),
    no clouds and no atmosphere to attenuate the rays. Remember how
    hot you can get just lying in the sun on a hot, cloudless day:
    in space, you get even more heat from the sun and it doesn't
    need to warm up half a continent of soil and rocks and handle
    an atmosphere distributing the heat --- it just has to warm
    the camera! And the camera also helps: all that electric power
    is going into heat.

    In space, in the habitable zone or closer, you're never cold.
    If you want cold, you need to work *hard*: heat shields against
    the sun, rejecting waste heat to space, waste heat management, etc.
    In fact, if you're a human *anywhere* in space and don't properly
    reject heat, you're going to boil pretty soon. 100 W waste
    heat accumulate pretty fast in a space suit.

    So the camera can get really warm and cool down to normal a lot.

    See the white/gray panels 90° to the solar panels: They're
    rejecting heat from the ISS. Note the open cargo bay of the
    space shuttle: the interior of the doors reject heat

    -Wolfgang
     
    Wolfgang Weisselberg, Apr 29, 2012
    #8
  9. Bowser <> wrote:
    > On Tue, 24 Apr 2012 06:45:33 +0100, "David J Taylor"


    >>Yes, a DSLR works quite happily in a zero-gravity environment, and outside
    >>(it's mentioned in the article). Hasselblads were, famously, used on the
    >>surface of the moon.


    > Yes, but modified. And the bodies are still there. Only the film
    > magazines made the return trip to save weight.


    Think what a collector would pay for them ...

    -Wolfgang
     
    Wolfgang Weisselberg, Apr 30, 2012
    #9
  10. David J Taylor

    Nick Fotis Guest

    Let's suppose that your logic is correct.

    What happens, then, when you are in the shadow of the ISS with your camera?

    Regarding the fluorite-based lenses, these may be working well when in
    direct sun, but when you got the low temperatures from working in the
    shadow of the ISS (or Earth's shadow), it could become very brittle.

    Not all missions and EVAs happen exclusively during daylight (a full
    rotation is nearly 1.5 hours, if I remember correctly)

    N.F.
     
    Nick Fotis, May 6, 2012
    #10
  11. Nick Fotis <> wrote:
    > Let's suppose that your logic is correct.


    > What happens, then, when you are in the shadow of the ISS with your camera?


    If you paint the heat shield so that you reach no more than
    46 degrees in the sun, it'll slowly, slowly (vacuum is a
    great insulator, that's why they use it in vacuum flasks)
    drop to -36 degrees. But that takes a long time.

    > Regarding the fluorite-based lenses, these may be working well when in
    > direct sun, but when you got the low temperatures from working in the
    > shadow of the ISS (or Earth's shadow), it could become very brittle.


    If you fear that might happen, you add a small heat source to
    the camera. For example waste heat from the human who
    operates it. Problem solved.

    > Not all missions and EVAs happen exclusively during daylight (a full
    > rotation is nearly 1.5 hours, if I remember correctly)


    It's not a problem, see above.

    -Wolfgang
     
    Wolfgang Weisselberg, May 7, 2012
    #11
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