Photographers are loners?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by doopydoo, Aug 21, 2006.

  1. doopydoo

    doopydoo Guest

    it's just an observation but i see a majority die hard photographers are
    loners
    doopydoo, Aug 21, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. doopydoo

    Paul Heslop Guest

    doopydoo wrote:
    >
    > it's just an observation but i see a majority die hard photographers are
    > loners


    and? Apart from it being bollocks what difference would it make?
    --
    Paul (Neurotic to the bone No doubt about it)
    ------------------------------------------------------
    Stop and Look
    http://www.geocities.com/dreamst8me/
    Paul Heslop, Aug 21, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. doopydoo

    Neil Ellwood Guest

    On Mon, 21 Aug 2006 04:46:16 +0000, doopydoo wrote:

    > it's just an observation but i see a majority die hard photographers are
    > loners

    Only while they are taking pictures.
    --
    Neil
    Delete l to reply
    Neil Ellwood, Aug 21, 2006
    #3
  4. doopydoo <> wrote:
    : it's just an observation but i see a majority die hard photographers are
    : loners

    You may be right to a point. Many of us do tend to enjoy our hobby while
    alone where we don't have to be so conciderate of the companion's
    frustration while we spend 10 min setting up the perfect shot, for the
    3rd thime that hour. :) In our non-hobby time we can be as welcoming of
    company as anyone else. I know that when I am with companions I tend to
    shoot more "snapshots" if anything. But when I am alone I may take upwards
    of half an hour walking around to find the exact right angle, and wait for
    the clouds to be in the right place, and the sun is highlighting the right
    feature. And at the same time I am fiddling with settings to hopefully
    catch the image I see in my mind. I may even take a dozen images, each
    with a slightly different set of settings and/or camera orientation. I've
    even spent 10 to 15 min shooting multiple images that will be later
    stitched into a massive image. Such things are hard to do when you have
    one or more other people standing around, tapping their feet, complaining
    about the heat/cold/hunger/getting late/etc.

    There are many hobbies that this "loner" tag can be put on. Think of the
    inventor or the model railroader, or for the clothing maker, or even the
    scrapbooker. All of these hobbies generally are enjoyed alone. The
    finished product will be shown off to others, but the actual
    manufacturing time is often spent quietly alone. :)

    So, yes I tend to be a loner when I am indulging in the more extreme forms
    of my hobby, but this alone state does not have to encompass all my life.
    :)

    Randy

    ==========
    Randy Berbaum
    Champaign, IL
    Randy Berbaum, Aug 21, 2006
    #4
  5. doopydoo

    Alfred Molon Guest

    In article <Xns9825DD79A654Cdoopydoocom@65.115.167.4>, doopydoo says...
    > it's just an observation but i see a majority die hard photographers are
    > loners


    While they are photographing they need to focus on photography, which is
    why other people accompanying them just disturb. My wife always
    complains that when she travels with me, she has to wait for me taking
    photos. Also photography opportunities pop up unexpectedly, so it's not
    good if somebody is with you.

    Having written this I've noticed that many good photographers are also
    skilled technicians/scientists, one might say "geeks", who tend to be
    more lone than gregarious.
    --

    Alfred Molon
    ------------------------------
    Olympus 50X0, 7070, 8080, E300, E330 and E500 forum at
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MyOlympus/
    Olympus E330 resource - http://myolympus.org/E330/
    Alfred Molon, Aug 21, 2006
    #5
  6. doopydoo

    Mark² Guest

    Randy Berbaum wrote:
    > doopydoo <> wrote:
    >> it's just an observation but i see a majority die hard photographers
    >> are loners

    >
    > You may be right to a point. Many of us do tend to enjoy our hobby
    > while alone where we don't have to be so conciderate of the
    > companion's frustration while we spend 10 min setting up the perfect
    > shot, for the 3rd thime that hour. :) In our non-hobby time we can be
    > as welcoming of company as anyone else. I know that when I am with
    > companions I tend to shoot more "snapshots" if anything. But when I
    > am alone I may take upwards of half an hour walking around to find
    > the exact right angle, and wait for the clouds to be in the right
    > place, and the sun is highlighting the right feature. And at the same
    > time I am fiddling with settings to hopefully catch the image I see
    > in my mind. I may even take a dozen images, each with a slightly
    > different set of settings and/or camera orientation. I've even spent
    > 10 to 15 min shooting multiple images that will be later stitched
    > into a massive image. Such things are hard to do when you have one or
    > more other people standing around, tapping their feet, complaining
    > about the heat/cold/hunger/getting late/etc.
    >
    > There are many hobbies that this "loner" tag can be put on. Think of
    > the inventor or the model railroader, or for the clothing maker, or
    > even the scrapbooker. All of these hobbies generally are enjoyed
    > alone. The finished product will be shown off to others, but the
    > actual manufacturing time is often spent quietly alone. :)
    >
    > So, yes I tend to be a loner when I am indulging in the more extreme
    > forms of my hobby, but this alone state does not have to encompass
    > all my life. :)


    This was a very good answer, Randy, and a good description in that it casts
    an accurate light on the needs/habits/tendencies of certain hobbies that are
    easily misunderstood or misinterpreted.

    -Mark²

    --
    Images (Plus Snaps & Grabs) by Mark² at:
    www.pbase.com/markuson
    Mark², Aug 21, 2006
    #6
  7. doopydoo

    Paul Heslop Guest

    Alfred Molon wrote:
    >
    > In article <Xns9825DD79A654Cdoopydoocom@65.115.167.4>, doopydoo says...
    > > it's just an observation but i see a majority die hard photographers are
    > > loners

    >
    > While they are photographing they need to focus on photography, which is
    > why other people accompanying them just disturb. My wife always
    > complains that when she travels with me, she has to wait for me taking
    > photos. Also photography opportunities pop up unexpectedly, so it's not
    > good if somebody is with you.
    >
    > Having written this I've noticed that many good photographers are also
    > skilled technicians/scientists, one might say "geeks", who tend to be
    > more lone than gregarious.
    > --
    >

    Is anyone waiting for our friend to reply? :O)


    --
    Paul (Neurotic to the bone No doubt about it)
    ------------------------------------------------------
    Stop and Look
    http://www.geocities.com/dreamst8me/
    Paul Heslop, Aug 21, 2006
    #7
  8. doopydoo

    ASAAR Guest

    On 21 Aug 2006 04:46:16 GMT, doopydoo dood wroote:

    > it's just an observation but i see a majority die hard photographers are
    > loners


    I suggest that you check out another observation. Namely, that the
    majority of doopy, immature trollers are attention seeking loners.

    If the photos of those kind enough to publish their photos on their
    personal websites are any indication, (and if this justifies calling
    them "die hard" photographers), they disprove your assertion.

    Waiting for some more doo to drop . . .
    ASAAR, Aug 21, 2006
    #8
  9. doopydoo

    ASAAR Guest

    On Mon, 21 Aug 2006 06:54:38 GMT, Paul Heslop wrote:

    >> Having written this I've noticed that many good photographers are also
    >> skilled technicians/scientists, one might say "geeks", who tend to be
    >> more lone than gregarious.
    >> --

    >
    > Is anyone waiting for our friend to reply? :O)


    "Only the lonely" -- Roy Orbison
    ASAAR, Aug 21, 2006
    #9
  10. doopydoo

    Guest

    Alfred Molon wrote:

    > While they are photographing they need to focus on photography, which is
    > why other people accompanying them just disturb. My wife always
    > complains that when she travels with me, she has to wait for me taking
    > photos. Also photography opportunities pop up unexpectedly, so it's not
    > good if somebody is with you.
    >


    I mostly photograph animals, and my favorite place to go is a wildlife
    park about an hour away. I know that if I go with most people, I will
    not have an ideal day. The worst is my sister. No patience whatsoever.
    A couple of my friends, who are 20 years older than me, and know I want
    to do photos, are very patient with me, though I do compromise a bit.
    One was very kind and took her grandson to the gift shop, because she
    knew I was waiting for the cougars to become active, and they never do
    if there is activity in the viewing area. I usually take several shots
    duringa wait of 2-3 hours, but the best shots are after a long wait.

    One buddy I love to take with me is my nephew. he is 19 years old now,
    but he was with me when he was 13 years old, and we waited 3 hours with
    the cougars. We saw them lay around doing nothing as people came
    through and left again. But we had several play sessions while nobody
    else was around. I got a shot toward the end of the female in midair as
    she was pouncing on the male, paws outstetched. I got a series of the
    female racing around and jumping over logs. A nice one of the male
    swatting the female in the butt. My nephew loves to be an assistant but
    won't use a camera himself. And he is just as crazy about animals
    (especially cats) as I am. So, he loves to spend 3 hours watching
    cougars. He complains when the park closes. And he is great for giving
    me commentary. If we are expecting a pounce, I usually track the victim
    since that will be where the action is, so I can't always see the
    hunter. So, he will tell me if the pounce is imminent, or if it is
    cancelled.

    > Having written this I've noticed that many good photographers are also
    > skilled technicians/scientists, one might say "geeks", who tend to be
    > more lone than gregarious.
    > --


    Yep. I was actually jealous of my sister for many years because she was
    great at drawing, and wasn't using her talent. I was horrible and
    wanted so badly to be able to draw a horse or cat well. Then I
    discovered photography. It's still art, something I thought I hated
    since I was horrible at it. But it is technical too. You have to have
    the right settings to get the right shot. And sometimes, it's a real
    challenge with the equipment you have, so you have to know your
    limitations and what you need to do. It was something I could master
    with study and experimentation.

    I learned that while I cannot create beauty, I can capture it, and I
    love being able to do that.
    , Aug 21, 2006
    #10
  11. doopydoo

    EDM Guest

    "doopydoo" <> wrote in message news:Xns9825DD79A654Cdoopydoocom@65.115.167.4...
    > it's just an observation but i see a majority die hard photographers are
    > loners


    Wow, do you know the majority of die hard photographers?

    But I tend to agree with your opinion, at least for amateur
    photographers and not people who make a living from it.
    Photography is a form of voyeurism, and most voyeurs
    prefer to just watch.
    EDM, Aug 21, 2006
    #11
  12. doopydoo

    minnesotti Guest

    doopydoo wrote:
    > it's just an observation but i see a majority die hard photographers are
    > loners


    Not all of them are loners. Some photographers are the gregarious
    easy-going kind of type who makes the pictures because they like to
    show them to other people, and thus to establish their credo of being a
    creative person.

    ...
    minnesotti, Aug 21, 2006
    #12
  13. doopydoo

    Paul Heslop Guest

    ASAAR wrote:
    >
    > On Mon, 21 Aug 2006 06:54:38 GMT, Paul Heslop wrote:
    >
    > >> Having written this I've noticed that many good photographers are also
    > >> skilled technicians/scientists, one might say "geeks", who tend to be
    > >> more lone than gregarious.
    > >> --

    > >
    > > Is anyone waiting for our friend to reply? :O)

    >
    > "Only the lonely" -- Roy Orbison


    :O)
    --
    Paul (Neurotic to the bone No doubt about it)
    ------------------------------------------------------
    Stop and Look
    http://www.geocities.com/dreamst8me/
    Paul Heslop, Aug 21, 2006
    #13
  14. doopydoo

    Gary C Guest

    "doopydoo" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns9825DD79A654Cdoopydoocom@65.115.167.4...
    > it's just an observation but i see a majority die hard photographers are
    > loners


    So are the best fisherman.
    Gary C, Aug 21, 2006
    #14
  15. doopydoo

    Guest

    this is not relegated to photography. unless the endeavor is one that
    requires engagement with others,,,if you want to dedicate yourself
    soley to a thing, you are going to find yourself alone a lot.....if for
    no other reason than most people waltz through life without any need
    to devote themselves to a "higher calling", and they will not
    understand you.

    and if you want to be truely truely great at something, you MUST be
    left undistracted.



    doopydoo wrote:
    > it's just an observation but i see a majority die hard photographers are
    > loners
    , Aug 21, 2006
    #15
  16. doopydoo

    Jer Guest

    doopydoo wrote:
    > it's just an observation but i see a majority die hard photographers are
    > loners



    Maybe, but it sure beats posting personally ignorant observations in a
    public discussion group with an incredibly inane moniker like doopydoo.
    Then again, when I decide I'm interested hearing your opinion on
    anything related to me, I'll buy you an opinion for your very own, take
    a picture of you with it, and come back the next day to beat it out of
    you with my cheap lens inside a sock. Now, kindly go **** yourself and
    leave the loners alone before I decide I'm bored with being such a
    pleasant fellow.

    --
    jer
    email reply - I am not a 'ten'
    Jer, Aug 21, 2006
    #16
  17. doopydoo

    Guest

    doopydoo wrote:
    > it's just an observation but i see a majority die hard photographers are
    > loners


    What about the good local camera clubs? I see many really good,
    dedicated photographers in such clubs and societies, and most are very
    social, with various activities for members. And of course many of
    these are associated with PSA, so there is a nationwide connectivity.
    , Aug 21, 2006
    #17
  18. Paul Heslop wrote:
    > ASAAR wrote:
    >> On Mon, 21 Aug 2006 06:54:38 GMT, Paul Heslop wrote:
    >>
    >>>> Having written this I've noticed that many good photographers are also
    >>>> skilled technicians/scientists, one might say "geeks", who tend to be
    >>>> more lone than gregarious.
    >>>>
    >>> Is anyone waiting for our friend to reply? :O)

    >> "Only the lonely" -- Roy Orbison

    >
    > :O)


    Been holding my breath for some time now. Guess OP is out with friends
    now....

    --
    lsmft

    "Baldrick, you wouldn't recognize a subtle plan if it painted itself
    purple and danced naked on top of a harpsichord singing 'Subtle Plans
    Are Here Again'."
    -- Blackadder
    John McWilliams, Aug 21, 2006
    #18
  19. doopydoo

    Lee K Guest

    "doopydoo" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns9825DD79A654Cdoopydoocom@65.115.167.4...
    > it's just an observation but i see a majority die hard photographers are
    > loners


    It's just an observation but most people named 'doopy' are loners,
    especially when it comes to sex.
    Lee K, Aug 21, 2006
    #19
  20. doopydoo

    Mxsmanic Guest

    doopydoo writes:

    > it's just an observation but i see a majority die hard photographers are
    > loners


    They certainly tend to be observers, but not necessarily loners. To
    some extent you have to stand on the outside and look in in order to
    take good photographs.

    --
    Transpose mxsmanic and gmail to reach me by e-mail.
    Mxsmanic, Aug 21, 2006
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Lionel
    Replies:
    34
    Views:
    2,777
    Lionel
    Jul 15, 2003
  2. Randall Ainsworth

    Re: Question for Pro Photographers

    Randall Ainsworth, Jul 18, 2003, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    309
    Todd Walker
    Jul 18, 2003
  3. Randall Ainsworth

    Re: Question for Pro Photographers

    Randall Ainsworth, Jul 18, 2003, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    355
    Randall Ainsworth
    Jul 18, 2003
  4. Cliff Spicer

    Re: Question for Pro Photographers

    Cliff Spicer, Jul 18, 2003, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    375
    Randall Ainsworth
    Jul 19, 2003
  5. RichA
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    316
    RichA
    Sep 10, 2010
Loading...

Share This Page