Photograph saves yards

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by tony cooper, Mar 6, 2011.

  1. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    At the PGA National in Palm Beach Gardens (FL), golfer Jerry Kelly hit
    a ball that stuck high up in a palm tree. The rules require him to
    prove that this is his ball before a ruling can be made that the ball
    is in an unplayable lie. A spectator with a long lens photographed
    the ball in the tree, and zoomed in on the ball to show the judges a
    green mark on the ball that identified it as Kelly's.

    With a lost ball, there is a one stroke penalty and the golfer has to
    re-hit from the original position. With an unplayable lie, the
    penalty is one stroke, but the ball is hit from same area as where it
    landed. The photograph allowed Kelly to hit from about 150 yards
    closer to the green than a lost ball would have been hit.

    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
    tony cooper, Mar 6, 2011
    #1
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  2. tony cooper

    otter Guest

    On Mar 6, 10:19 am, tony cooper <> wrote:
    > At the PGA National in Palm Beach Gardens (FL), golfer Jerry Kelly hit
    > a ball that stuck high up in a palm tree.  The rules require him to
    > prove that this is his ball before a ruling can be made that the ball
    > is in an unplayable lie.  A spectator with a long lens photographed
    > the ball in the tree, and zoomed in on the ball to show the judges a
    > green mark on the ball that identified it as Kelly's.
    >
    > With a lost ball, there is a one stroke penalty and the golfer has to
    > re-hit from the original position.  With an unplayable lie, the
    > penalty is one stroke, but the ball is hit from same area as where it
    > landed.  The photograph allowed Kelly to hit from about 150 yards
    > closer to the green than a lost ball would have been hit.
    >
    > --
    > Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida


    I'm surprised that a "spectator" with a camera would be allowed into a
    PGA event on a competition day. Only professionals with credentials
    are supposed to have cameras except on practice days.

    Maybe someone snuck a superzoom compact in? I wonder if they were
    escorted out after they did the good deed?
    otter, Mar 6, 2011
    #2
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  3. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    On Sun, 6 Mar 2011 11:46:48 -0800 (PST), otter
    <> wrote:

    >On Mar 6, 10:19 am, tony cooper <> wrote:
    >> At the PGA National in Palm Beach Gardens (FL), golfer Jerry Kelly hit
    >> a ball that stuck high up in a palm tree.  The rules require him to
    >> prove that this is his ball before a ruling can be made that the ball
    >> is in an unplayable lie.  A spectator with a long lens photographed
    >> the ball in the tree, and zoomed in on the ball to show the judges a
    >> green mark on the ball that identified it as Kelly's.
    >>
    >> With a lost ball, there is a one stroke penalty and the golfer has to
    >> re-hit from the original position.  With an unplayable lie, the
    >> penalty is one stroke, but the ball is hit from same area as where it
    >> landed.  The photograph allowed Kelly to hit from about 150 yards
    >> closer to the green than a lost ball would have been hit.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida

    >
    >I'm surprised that a "spectator" with a camera would be allowed into a
    >PGA event on a competition day. Only professionals with credentials
    >are supposed to have cameras except on practice days.
    >
    >Maybe someone snuck a superzoom compact in? I wonder if they were
    >escorted out after they did the good deed?


    I dug the newspaper out of the trash and re-read the article. It says
    "a photographer", so it must have been a pro photographer.


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
    tony cooper, Mar 6, 2011
    #3
  4. tony cooper

    Robert Coe Guest

    On Sun, 06 Mar 2011 11:19:32 -0500, tony cooper <>
    wrote:
    : At the PGA National in Palm Beach Gardens (FL), golfer Jerry Kelly hit
    : a ball that stuck high up in a palm tree. The rules require him to
    : prove that this is his ball before a ruling can be made that the ball
    : is in an unplayable lie. A spectator with a long lens photographed
    : the ball in the tree, and zoomed in on the ball to show the judges a
    : green mark on the ball that identified it as Kelly's.
    :
    : With a lost ball, there is a one stroke penalty and the golfer has to
    : re-hit from the original position. With an unplayable lie, the
    : penalty is one stroke, but the ball is hit from same area as where it
    : landed. The photograph allowed Kelly to hit from about 150 yards
    : closer to the green than a lost ball would have been hit.

    Kelly was lucky that spectator was there. I'll bet he never goes out on the
    links again without a camera in his golf bag (or around his caddy's neck).

    But why stop there? why not make golf balls with embedded RFID chips, so
    they're harder to lose? Or does somebody do that already?

    Bob
    Robert Coe, Mar 6, 2011
    #4
  5. tony cooper

    Robert Coe Guest

    On Sun, 06 Mar 2011 16:56:54 -0500, Alan Browne
    <> wrote:
    : On 2011.03.06 14:46 , otter wrote:
    : > On Mar 6, 10:19 am, tony cooper<> wrote:
    : >> At the PGA National in Palm Beach Gardens (FL), golfer Jerry Kelly hit
    : >> a ball that stuck high up in a palm tree. The rules require him to
    : >> prove that this is his ball before a ruling can be made that the ball
    : >> is in an unplayable lie. A spectator with a long lens photographed
    : >> the ball in the tree, and zoomed in on the ball to show the judges a
    : >> green mark on the ball that identified it as Kelly's.
    : >>
    : >> With a lost ball, there is a one stroke penalty and the golfer has to
    : >> re-hit from the original position. With an unplayable lie, the
    : >> penalty is one stroke, but the ball is hit from same area as where it
    : >> landed. The photograph allowed Kelly to hit from about 150 yards
    : >> closer to the green than a lost ball would have been hit.
    : >>
    : >> --
    : >> Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
    : >
    : > I'm surprised that a "spectator" with a camera would be allowed into a
    : > PGA event on a competition day. Only professionals with credentials
    : > are supposed to have cameras except on practice days.
    : >
    : > Maybe someone snuck a superzoom compact in? I wonder if they were
    : > escorted out after they did the good deed?
    :
    : IIRC Bret Dougls (aka Anika1980) has been to several pro events with big
    : gear and no credentials.

    Isn't Bret a professional golfer? Maybe he was a competitor. And/or maybe he
    did his shooting on practice days.

    Bob
    Robert Coe, Mar 6, 2011
    #5
  6. tony cooper

    PeterN Guest

    On 3/6/2011 6:23 PM, Savageduck wrote:
    > On 2011-03-06 13:56:54 -0800, Alan Browne
    > <> said:
    >
    >> On 2011.03.06 14:46 , otter wrote:
    >>> On Mar 6, 10:19 am, tony cooper<> wrote:
    >>>> At the PGA National in Palm Beach Gardens (FL), golfer Jerry Kelly hit
    >>>> a ball that stuck high up in a palm tree. The rules require him to
    >>>> prove that this is his ball before a ruling can be made that the ball
    >>>> is in an unplayable lie. A spectator with a long lens photographed
    >>>> the ball in the tree, and zoomed in on the ball to show the judges a
    >>>> green mark on the ball that identified it as Kelly's.
    >>>>
    >>>> With a lost ball, there is a one stroke penalty and the golfer has to
    >>>> re-hit from the original position. With an unplayable lie, the
    >>>> penalty is one stroke, but the ball is hit from same area as where it
    >>>> landed. The photograph allowed Kelly to hit from about 150 yards
    >>>> closer to the green than a lost ball would have been hit.
    >>>>
    >>>> --
    >>>> Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
    >>>
    >>> I'm surprised that a "spectator" with a camera would be allowed into a
    >>> PGA event on a competition day. Only professionals with credentials
    >>> are supposed to have cameras except on practice days.
    >>>
    >>> Maybe someone snuck a superzoom compact in? I wonder if they were
    >>> escorted out after they did the good deed?

    >>
    >> IIRC Bret Dougls (aka Anika1980) has been to several pro events with
    >> big gear and no credentials.

    >
    > At The Open at Pebble Beach last year, non-credentialed photographers
    > could only shoot on practice days. For all play rounds there was an
    > enforced no camera/no cell phone rule.
    >
    > < http://homepage.mac.com/lco/filechute/PB-DNC3507w.jpg >
    > < http://homepage.mac.com/lco/filechute/PB-DNC3570w.jpg >
    >


    I have worked as a marshal at several pro events. That rule is strictly
    enforced, according to who seers you. Typically they will ask you to put
    the cell phone away. The biggest concern is distraction of the players.
    Accredited press photographers are allowed. The Tour has agreements with
    other photographers who agree that all commercial use goes through the
    tour. Then there are sponsors photographers who have separate
    agreements. Bottom line you need permission to even carry a camera on
    the course.


    --
    Peter
    PeterN, Mar 6, 2011
    #6
  7. tony cooper

    Robert Coe Guest

    On Sun, 06 Mar 2011 18:36:39 -0500, PeterN <>
    wrote:
    : On 3/6/2011 6:23 PM, Savageduck wrote:
    : > On 2011-03-06 13:56:54 -0800, Alan Browne
    : > <> said:
    : >
    : >> On 2011.03.06 14:46 , otter wrote:
    : >>> On Mar 6, 10:19 am, tony cooper<> wrote:
    : >>>> At the PGA National in Palm Beach Gardens (FL), golfer Jerry Kelly hit
    : >>>> a ball that stuck high up in a palm tree. The rules require him to
    : >>>> prove that this is his ball before a ruling can be made that the ball
    : >>>> is in an unplayable lie. A spectator with a long lens photographed
    : >>>> the ball in the tree, and zoomed in on the ball to show the judges a
    : >>>> green mark on the ball that identified it as Kelly's.
    : >>>>
    : >>>> With a lost ball, there is a one stroke penalty and the golfer has to
    : >>>> re-hit from the original position. With an unplayable lie, the
    : >>>> penalty is one stroke, but the ball is hit from same area as where it
    : >>>> landed. The photograph allowed Kelly to hit from about 150 yards
    : >>>> closer to the green than a lost ball would have been hit.
    : >>>>
    : >>>> --
    : >>>> Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
    : >>>
    : >>> I'm surprised that a "spectator" with a camera would be allowed into a
    : >>> PGA event on a competition day. Only professionals with credentials
    : >>> are supposed to have cameras except on practice days.
    : >>>
    : >>> Maybe someone snuck a superzoom compact in? I wonder if they were
    : >>> escorted out after they did the good deed?
    : >>
    : >> IIRC Bret Dougls (aka Anika1980) has been to several pro events with
    : >> big gear and no credentials.
    : >
    : > At The Open at Pebble Beach last year, non-credentialed photographers
    : > could only shoot on practice days. For all play rounds there was an
    : > enforced no camera/no cell phone rule.
    : >
    : > < http://homepage.mac.com/lco/filechute/PB-DNC3507w.jpg >
    : > < http://homepage.mac.com/lco/filechute/PB-DNC3570w.jpg >
    : >
    :
    : I have worked as a marshal at several pro events. That rule is strictly
    : enforced, according to who seers you. Typically they will ask you to put
    : the cell phone away. The biggest concern is distraction of the players.

    I've always had to laugh at how sensitive golfers are to distraction. A
    basketball player lining up a free throw may have every person in the building
    yelling at him, but a golfer lining up a putt dissolves if a phone rings or a
    camera clicks.

    : Accredited press photographers are allowed. The Tour has agreements with
    : other photographers who agree that all commercial use goes through the
    : tour. Then there are sponsors photographers who have separate
    : agreements. Bottom line you need permission to even carry a camera on
    : the course.

    Just one more reason not to attend.

    Bob
    Robert Coe, Mar 7, 2011
    #7
  8. tony cooper

    otter Guest

    On Mar 6, 3:56 pm, Alan Browne <>
    wrote:
    > On 2011.03.06 14:46 , otter wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Mar 6, 10:19 am, tony cooper<>  wrote:
    > >> At the PGA National in Palm Beach Gardens (FL), golfer Jerry Kelly hit
    > >> a ball that stuck high up in a palm tree.  The rules require him to
    > >> prove that this is his ball before a ruling can be made that the ball
    > >> is in an unplayable lie.  A spectator with a long lens photographed
    > >> the ball in the tree, and zoomed in on the ball to show the judges a
    > >> green mark on the ball that identified it as Kelly's.

    >
    > >> With a lost ball, there is a one stroke penalty and the golfer has to
    > >> re-hit from the original position.  With an unplayable lie, the
    > >> penalty is one stroke, but the ball is hit from same area as where it
    > >> landed.  The photograph allowed Kelly to hit from about 150 yards
    > >> closer to the green than a lost ball would have been hit.

    >
    > >> --
    > >> Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida

    >
    > > I'm surprised that a "spectator" with a camera would be allowed into a
    > > PGA event on a competition day. Only professionals with credentials
    > > are supposed to have cameras except on practice days.

    >
    > > Maybe someone snuck a superzoom compact in?  I wonder if they were
    > > escorted out after they did the good deed?

    >
    > IIRC Bret Dougls (aka Anika1980) has been to several pro events with big
    > gear and no credentials.
    >
    > --
    > gmail originated posts filtered due to spam.


    I know Bret from a golf group we both frequented, and have seen his
    pictures. He took them on practice days.
    otter, Mar 7, 2011
    #8
  9. tony cooper

    otter Guest

    On Mar 6, 3:52 pm, Robert Coe <> wrote:
    > On Sun, 06 Mar 2011 11:19:32 -0500, tony cooper <tony_cooper...@earthlink..net>
    > wrote:
    > : At the PGA National in Palm Beach Gardens (FL), golfer Jerry Kelly hit
    > : a ball that stuck high up in a palm tree.  The rules require him to
    > : prove that this is his ball before a ruling can be made that the ball
    > : is in an unplayable lie.  A spectator with a long lens photographed
    > : the ball in the tree, and zoomed in on the ball to show the judges a
    > : green mark on the ball that identified it as Kelly's.
    > :
    > : With a lost ball, there is a one stroke penalty and the golfer has to
    > : re-hit from the original position.  With an unplayable lie, the
    > : penalty is one stroke, but the ball is hit from same area as where it
    > : landed.  The photograph allowed Kelly to hit from about 150 yards
    > : closer to the green than a lost ball would have been hit.
    >
    > Kelly was lucky that spectator was there. I'll bet he never goes out on the
    > links again without a camera in his golf bag (or around his caddy's neck)


    Aside from the spectator/photographer discussion, it would probably be
    considered an illegal artificial aid for the golfer or caddie to carry
    it, like range finders are. Especially if they used it to locate or
    identify a golf ball.
    ..
    >
    > But why stop there? why not make golf balls with embedded RFID chips, so
    > they're harder to lose? Or does somebody do that already?


    I believe someone did market those, but they were too expensive for
    mere mortals, and didn't perform well in the primary function of a
    golf ball (driving, putting, etc). Plus they would probably be
    considered illegal by the USGA, so no pro could use them.

    >
    > Bob
    otter, Mar 7, 2011
    #9
  10. tony cooper

    Irwell Guest

    On Mon, 7 Mar 2011 06:37:39 -0800, Savageduck wrote:

    > On 2011-03-07 06:07:26 -0800, otter <> said:
    >
    >> On Mar 6, 3:52 pm, Robert Coe <> wrote:

    > <<Le Snip>>
    >>
    >>>
    >>> But why stop there? why not make golf balls with embedded RFID chips, so
    >>> they're harder to lose? Or does somebody do that already?

    >>
    >> I believe someone did market those, but they were too expensive for
    >> mere mortals, and didn't perform well in the primary function of a
    >> golf ball (driving, putting, etc). Plus they would probably be
    >> considered illegal by the USGA, so no pro could use them.

    >
    > So would that be a "Quid no pro"?


    A fairway of putting it.
    Irwell, Mar 7, 2011
    #10
  11. tony cooper

    Whisky-dave Guest

    On Mar 6, 9:52 pm, Robert Coe <> wrote:
    > On Sun, 06 Mar 2011 11:19:32 -0500, tony cooper <tony_cooper...@earthlink..net>
    > wrote:
    > : At the PGA National in Palm Beach Gardens (FL), golfer Jerry Kelly hit
    > : a ball that stuck high up in a palm tree.  The rules require him to
    > : prove that this is his ball before a ruling can be made that the ball
    > : is in an unplayable lie.  A spectator with a long lens photographed
    > : the ball in the tree, and zoomed in on the ball to show the judges a
    > : green mark on the ball that identified it as Kelly's.
    > :
    > : With a lost ball, there is a one stroke penalty and the golfer has to
    > : re-hit from the original position.  With an unplayable lie, the
    > : penalty is one stroke, but the ball is hit from same area as where it
    > : landed.  The photograph allowed Kelly to hit from about 150 yards
    > : closer to the green than a lost ball would have been hit.
    >
    > Kelly was lucky that spectator was there. I'll bet he never goes out on the
    > links again without a camera in his golf bag (or around his caddy's neck)..
    >
    > But why stop there? why not make golf balls with embedded RFID chips, so
    > they're harder to lose? Or does somebody do that already?


    Could be because the specs of the ball would change, balance, density
    etc.
    And I though they were solid rubber. Also RFID is usually a close form
    of IDing
    i.e not from a distance, and of course there's a cost involved.

    >
    > Bob
    Whisky-dave, Mar 7, 2011
    #11
  12. tony cooper

    Peter N Guest

    On Mon, 7 Mar 2011 06:37:39 -0800, Savageduck
    <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:
    > On 2011-03-07 06:07:26 -0800, otter <> said:



    > > On Mar 6, 3:52pm, Robert Coe <> wrote:

    > <<Le Snip>>
    > >
    > >>
    > >> But why stop there? why not make golf balls with embedded RFID

    chips, so
    > >> they're harder to lose? Or does somebody do that already?

    > >
    > > I believe someone did market those, but they were too expensive

    for
    > > mere mortals, and didn't perform well in the primary function of a
    > > golf ball (driving, putting, etc). Plus they would probably be
    > > considered illegal by the USGA, so no pro could use them.



    > So would that be a "Quid no pro"?



    > --
    > Regards,



    > Savageduck


    No quidding

    --
    from my Droid
    Peter N, Mar 10, 2011
    #12
  13. tony cooper

    Peter N Guest

    On Mon, 7 Mar 2011 07:58:35 -0800, Irwell <> wrote:
    > On Mon, 7 Mar 2011 06:37:39 -0800, Savageduck wrote:



    > > On 2011-03-07 06:07:26 -0800, otter <>

    said:
    > >
    > >> On Mar 6, 3:52pm, Robert Coe <> wrote:

    > > <<Le Snip>>
    > >>
    > >>>
    > >>> But why stop there? why not make golf balls with embedded RFID

    chips, so
    > >>> they're harder to lose? Or does somebody do that already?
    > >>
    > >> I believe someone did market those, but they were too expensive

    for
    > >> mere mortals, and didn't perform well in the primary function of

    a
    > >> golf ball (driving, putting, etc). Plus they would probably be
    > >> considered illegal by the USGA, so no pro could use them.

    > >
    > > So would that be a "Quid no pro"?



    > A fairway of putting it.


    Not 1 word about his putts.

    --
    from my Droid
    Peter N, Mar 10, 2011
    #13
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