photo printing and linux

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by cc, Dec 4, 2003.

  1. cc

    cc Guest

    Sorry if this is a double post. I posted it but I don't see it on the list.

    I'm looking for real life experiences of those who have used a photo
    printer with Linux. I have consulted various sites which say which
    hardware is compatible with Linux, but due to a recent bad experience
    with a scanner which just doesn't work despite information that it works
    perfectly, I'd like to know which printers really have full
    functionality. I have also seen stuff about software profiles for the
    various papers. Do these work in Linux, and are they really necessary?
    Thanks.
    cc, Dec 4, 2003
    #1
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  2. cc

    cc Guest

    Come to think of it, I also need to know how well the Canon 10D works
    with Linux. Thanks.
    cc, Dec 4, 2003
    #2
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  3. Let us know how the 10D works with Linux.

    Anyway I have printed out perfect photos with an epson 820 (pretty
    old) with Linux, and it works great with the gimp-print/cupsys
    combination with debian sarge. Totally seamless, and includes all the
    options that the epson 820 can handle. I had all the options the windows
    driver had including type of paper.

    I would suggest that you take a close look at the mail list for
    gimp-print to ask others about their results. It is my opinion that
    gimp-print has the best open source drivers for Linux for the epson
    820. For other printers you better ask in a Linux newsgroup or mailist.
    This is pretty much a windows/mac group. The debate about which of the
    two is best reminds me of the good ole days of usenet. This is a pretty
    wild bunch ;-).

    http://gimp-print.sourceforge.net/

    Good luck and let us know what you come up and the results. I'm about
    to give my trusty epson to my daugther in college and it is time to
    get another printer.

    The best advice I can give is that more hardware is supported by Linux
    than any other OS, and yes that even means windows (remember currently
    the latest releases of windows desktop only support x86 hardware).
    However, the quality varies widely, and the level of support varies
    widely. Once got a sound card that had Linux drivers and sure enough
    it was supported but it had no support for the optical input/output
    ports, and the company refused to release the information. Basically
    an anlog only sound card. I dumped the card.

    Later

    Alan


    >>>>> "cc" == cc <> writes:


    cc> Sorry if this is a double post. I posted it but I don't see it on
    cc> the list. I'm looking for real life experiences of those who have
    cc> used a photo printer with Linux. I have consulted various sites
    cc> which say which hardware is compatible with Linux, but due to a
    cc> recent bad experience with a scanner which just doesn't work
    cc> despite information that it works perfectly, I'd like to know
    cc> which printers really have full functionality. I have also seen
    cc> stuff about software profiles for the various papers. Do these
    cc> work in Linux, and are they really necessary? Thanks.
    Spam Me Please, Dec 4, 2003
    #3
  4. cc

    Mark Herring Guest

    On Wed, 03 Dec 2003 23:12:41 -0500, cc <> wrote:

    >Sorry if this is a double post. I posted it but I don't see it on the list.
    >
    >I'm looking for real life experiences of those who have used a photo
    >printer with Linux. I have consulted various sites which say which
    >hardware is compatible with Linux, but due to a recent bad experience
    >with a scanner which just doesn't work despite information that it works
    >perfectly, I'd like to know which printers really have full
    >functionality. I have also seen stuff about software profiles for the
    >various papers. Do these work in Linux, and are they really necessary?
    >Thanks.

    According to my reading, Linux is basically "there" when it comes to
    supporting all common peripherals. No personal experience recently,
    but my attempts with linux have all been positive.
    **************************
    Mark Herring, Pasadena, Calif.
    Private e-mail: Just say no to "No".
    Mark Herring, Dec 4, 2003
    #4
  5. cc

    Jim Townsend Guest

    cc wrote:

    > Sorry if this is a double post. I posted it but I don't see it on the list.
    >
    > I'm looking for real life experiences of those who have used a photo
    > printer with Linux. I have consulted various sites which say which
    > hardware is compatible with Linux, but due to a recent bad experience
    > with a scanner which just doesn't work despite information that it works
    > perfectly, I'd like to know which printers really have full
    > functionality. I have also seen stuff about software profiles for the
    > various papers. Do these work in Linux, and are they really necessary?
    > Thanks.


    Most color photoprinters are supported under Linux.. Many manufacturers supply
    their own drivers.

    I've had no real luck with my HP 952C deskjet. No matter how high I set the
    resolution, I get a noticeably grainy picture. Oddly, WinXP does the same. I
    have to boot to Win98 to get decent results.. It's probably something I'm
    doing on my end :)

    I have spoken with other users who have had great results printing with Linux..
    It really isn't magic.. You set the printer up the same way..(draft,
    landscape, DPI etc) It's just the interface is different.

    The 10D works fine with Linux.. It supports USB PTP and gphoto2 will read it
    OK. I have the GUI interface GTkam.. You can't mount it as a device.

    The 10D is painfully slow at transferring data under any OS.. I use a Sandisk
    card reader under Linux..
    Jim Townsend, Dec 4, 2003
    #5
  6. cc

    Chris Brown Guest

    In article <>, cc <> wrote:
    >Come to think of it, I also need to know how well the Canon 10D works
    >with Linux. Thanks.


    Although I'm primarilly an OS X user these days, I've used Canon DSLRs
    (including the 10D) with Linux and a USB card reader. Works well enough. Raw
    conversion is a bit of a pain. I had varying levels of success running
    Windows raw convertors under WINE, and there's always dcraw, although I tend
    to find its output is a bit artifacty at times.

    As for printing, I use an Epson Stylus Photo 1290 (1280 for US readers).
    This works well with GIMP Print, even if it's a little tricky to get the
    colours to match closely. It used to be the case that GIMP Print gave better
    results than the Epson drivers, but Epson seem to have improved their game
    a bit since - their new OS X drivers are pretty good. One thing I did have
    trouble with was that the printer shipped in a funny mode, and it wouldn't
    work with the GIMP Print driver until I printed a test page using the
    Windows driver (under VMWare). From that point it worked perfectly, but it's
    something to look out for.

    The other alternative is to spoil yourself and buy a low-end OS X machine to
    use with your digital photography. It's UNIX, so will play nicely with your
    Linux box, but runs all the useful stuff like Photoshop, and has ICM.
    Chris Brown, Dec 4, 2003
    #6
  7. cc

    nick Guest

    On Wed, 03 Dec 2003 23:12:41 -0500, cc wrote:

    > Sorry if this is a double post. I posted it but I don't see it on the list.
    >
    > I'm looking for real life experiences of those who have used a photo
    > printer with Linux. I have consulted various sites which say which
    > hardware is compatible with Linux, but due to a recent bad experience
    > with a scanner which just doesn't work despite information that it works
    > perfectly, I'd like to know which printers really have full
    > functionality. I have also seen stuff about software profiles for the
    > various papers. Do these work in Linux, and are they really necessary?
    > Thanks.


    My Epson Stylus Photo 1270 works perfectly with Gimp. Different paper,
    resonlution, landscape etc. settings with a nice graphical preview of
    where and how big the pic will be on the paper.

    Check out Gimp and Gimp-print.

    Nick
    nick, Dec 4, 2003
    #7
  8. cc <> writes:

    > Sorry if this is a double post. I posted it but I don't see it on the list.
    >
    > I'm looking for real life experiences of those who have used a photo printer
    > with Linux. I have consulted various sites which say which hardware is
    > compatible with Linux, but due to a recent bad experience with a scanner which
    > just doesn't work despite information that it works perfectly, I'd like to know
    > which printers really have full functionality. I have also seen stuff about
    > software profiles for the various papers. Do these work in Linux, and are they
    > really necessary? Thanks.


    I use a HP Deskjet 6122 connected to a Linksys printserver that works very well
    with Red Hat 9 and Fedora core 1 systems, using the CUPS printer driver. The
    biggest problem I have is printer specific (track marks on most of the heavier
    papers) and not affected by the choice of the OS used to print. It would be
    nice to have more control such as the Windows drivers have (paper type, dry
    time, etc.), but the prints that come out look nice. I also have Lexmark Optra
    Color 40 I bought at a closeout sale, and it does not produce acceptable photo
    output (text and light graphics are ok, but since it has been off the market
    for 2-3 years, you don't have to worry about it).

    The web site for CUPS is http://www.cups.org/. My sense is HP and Epson have
    people updating the drivers for printers and newer versions of CUPS + filters
    will support new printers, but Canon printers are supported only by volunteers,
    and many recent Canon's don't seem to be listed. The website
    http://www.linuxprinting.org/ tries to cover the level of support of the
    various printers.

    ========================================

    Here is part of the overview from linuxprinting.org on suggested printers:

    Please consider buying your printer through one of the links on the individual
    printer pages; if you do, a portion of your purchase will help support this
    site and the Printing HOWTO. This isn't limited to printers: the next time you
    need ink, toner, or paper, consider buying through any of the links on this
    site, and LinuxPrinting.org will get a small share of that purchase, too.

    For more information on these affiliate programs and the vendors, see the
    affiliate page. Color Inkjets There are two brands worth considering for use
    with free software:

    Epson

    The Epson Stylus line, as driven by the gimp-print driver, is a good choice
    for color inkjets. The driver provides excellent quality and extensive
    tunability both of the quality/speed tradeoff and color rendition.

    Epson has several series of Styli: a Color series, sporting a four color
    CMYK process; the newer C series, most of which sport pigment based
    fade-proof inks; and a Photo series, sporting a six color CMYKcm
    process. The free driver produces output of very good quality on all three
    types. For a bit more detail, see this forum posting by the gimp-print
    author.

    Note that some Epson models have a problem with fading cyan dye (aka
    "orange shift") in high ozone environments; for more information on this
    see Epson's website.

    Hewlett-Packard

    Most of the HP inkjet line is supported using a driver provided by HP. Most
    newer HP models produce very good photo and text output. Duplex printing on
    paper sizes up to A3 are also supported. The main limitation of the driver
    is that you do not have any adjustments to fine-tune the output, but the
    colour reproduction is already very good out-of-the-box; certainly for most
    consumer and business use it is quite suitable.

    The HP "hpijs" driver is provided under a free license; like the gimp-print
    driver for Epsons, it is included in many modern Linux distributions.

    Other Brands

    There are few good free software drivers for Canon and Lexmark inkjets. Do
    not buy one and expect success.

    Which to buy?

    By way of comparison, the gimp-print Epson driver uses better dithering
    techniques and produces very good color quality on printers for which it has
    mature support. Basic color tuning adjustments are fairly flexible in
    gimp-print, and an improved color model with full-blown profile support is
    being planned. HP's driver offers less advanced dithering techniques and fewer
    adjustments, but with fairly uniform color quality across all the printers it
    supports.

    HP devices generally use integrated ink-and-printhead cartridges; these are a
    clear plus if you print in clog-inducing ways (ie very infrequently, or in
    dusty environs). OTOH, if you do clog, with the HPs you must use awkward button
    presses to run a clean or test cycle; for the Epsons, gimp-print includes
    cleaning/loading/testing software. Furthermore, for many Epsons alternative
    special-purpose inks are available (archival, greyscale, altered gamuts, etc),
    as well as more options for refilling and continuous-feed systems. In most
    cases, the Epson arrangement is better; at the cost of some simple regular
    maintenance you get a more flexible and capable device.

    Epson devices generally produce better photo output; this is especially true
    when using the gimp-print driver. HP devices are generally held to produce
    better text output, although with the latest models, Epson has caught up to
    HP's text abilities.

    ========================================

    Here is the overview from the hpijs driver for the HP printers:

    The Hewlett-Packard Inkjet Driver Project is a add-on to the GNU Ghostscript
    application. This driver is open source software based on the Hewlett Packard
    Appliance Printing Development Kit APDK for deskjet printers. Table of
    contents

    * 1 Overview
    * 2 License
    * 3 System Requirements
    * 4 Driver Support
    o 4.1 Device Descriptions
    o 4.1 Paper Sizes
    * 5 Updates
    * 6 Installation
    o 6.1 HP Inkjet Driver
    o 6.2 Ghostscript
    o 6.3 PrintTool
    * 7 Usage
    o 7.1 Spooler Example
    o 7.2 Ghostscript Example
    * 8 Project Development

    1 Overview

    The Hewlett-Packard Inkjet Driver Project (HPIJS) is a add-on printer driver
    for GNU Ghostscript. This driver is open source software based on the
    Hewlett-Packard Appliance Printing Development Kit APDK for deskjet
    printers. The driver uses the IJS interface which is a generalized IPC
    interface for client/server communications. The IJS interface, which was
    written by Raph Levien of Ghostscript, was inspired by the first HPIJS
    interface. The IJS interface can be used by any printer manufacturer.

    There are two parts to the IJS interface - IJS client that resides in GNU
    Ghostscript and the IJS server. The IJS server is built into the printer
    driver, in our case the HP Inkjet driver. In this document the term IJS server,
    HPIJS server, HPIJS, or HP Inkjet Driver are all synonymous. They all refer to
    the same software component. HPIJS runs as a server or co-process to GNU
    Ghostscript. The server is spawned automatically by GNU Ghostscript. The
    following figure is a high level overview of the IJS interface between GNU
    Ghostscript and HPIJS.

    GNU Ghostscript is a software application that interprets PostScript and
    displays the results on the screen or converts the PostScript into a form you
    can print on a non-PostScript printer.

    PostScript is a programming language optimized for printing graphics and text,
    it is sometimes called a page description language. Most Linux applications
    support PostScript. Postscript is the standard for printing in any Linux or
    Unix environment.

    Ghostscript supports many output devices, including many different
    printers. This document addresses how to build, install and use HPIJS with
    Ghostscript. This document is intended for distributions and experienced
    users. Other users should refer to their appropriate Linux distribution for
    HPIJS support.

    Although HPIJS runs as a separate process from Ghostscript, HPIJS still looks
    like just another Ghostscript printer driver. Adding printer drivers is a well
    documented interface that is described in the GNU Ghostscript documentation at
    http://www.cs.wisc.edu/~ghost/doc/gnu/index.htm. Together with Ghostscript and
    HPIJS, PostScript can be converted to a printer language that is compatible
    with many of the latest HP printer products. See Installation on how to
    download and install HPIJS.

    HPIJS supports both the new IJS interface and the old HPIJS interface. Support
    for the HPIJS interface is provided for backward compatibility only. All new
    features will be supported on the IJS interface only. This document only
    addresses how to use HPIJS using the IJS interface. The old HPIJS interface is
    defined in the HPIJS 0.97 release. More information on the IJS interface can be
    found at inkjet-list.

    Ghostscript is not a gui application. Ghostscript is a command line application
    that runs from a Linux shell, similar to a Microsoft DOS command run from a DOS
    window.

    Ghostscript can be used by itself to print to a non-Postscript printer, but
    generally a print spooler must be used. The print spooler must be configured to
    use Ghostscript when printing to a non-Postscript printer. Many Linux
    distributions all ready support HPIJS in their spooler system, see their web
    site for spooler support questions. Additional information is available at
    www.linuxprinting.org.

    --
    Michael Meissner
    email:
    http://www.the-meissners.org
    Michael Meissner, Dec 4, 2003
    #8
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