Phone to UK capped

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Geopelia, Mar 19, 2012.

  1. Geopelia

    Geopelia Guest

    We want to phone UK and Telecom talks about "capped". $4.50 capped. What do
    they mean please? These are pages of answers to questions, but I can't find
    an answer to that. It's 33 cents a minute, I think.

    There used to be special prices at different times, but I can't see anything
    about that either, on their website.
    It's from a home phone, not a mobile.

    Thank you
    Geopelia
    Geopelia, Mar 19, 2012
    #1
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  2. Geopelia

    Me Guest

    On 20/03/2012 10:20 a.m., Geopelia wrote:
    > We want to phone UK and Telecom talks about "capped". $4.50 capped. What do
    > they mean please? These are pages of answers to questions, but I can't find
    > an answer to that. It's 33 cents a minute, I think.
    >
    > There used to be special prices at different times, but I can't see anything
    > about that either, on their website.
    > It's from a home phone, not a mobile.
    >

    Presumably, that means the maximum charge per call is $4.50.
    So after 14 minutes or so at $0.33 per minute, you can keep talking for
    free.
    Me, Mar 19, 2012
    #2
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  3. Geopelia

    Donchano Guest

    On Tue, 20 Mar 2012 10:20:27 +1300, "Geopelia" <>
    shouted from the highest rooftop:

    >We want to phone UK and Telecom talks about "capped". $4.50 capped. What do
    >they mean please? These are pages of answers to questions, but I can't find
    >an answer to that. It's 33 cents a minute, I think.
    >
    >There used to be special prices at different times, but I can't see anything
    >about that either, on their website.
    >It's from a home phone, not a mobile.
    >
    >Thank you
    >Geopelia


    I think it means your call will cost 33 cents a minute up to a maximum
    of $4.50 for a call of UP TO two hours.
    Donchano, Mar 19, 2012
    #3
  4. Geopelia

    Geopelia Guest

    "Donchano" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > On Tue, 20 Mar 2012 10:20:27 +1300, "Geopelia" <>
    > shouted from the highest rooftop:
    >
    >>We want to phone UK and Telecom talks about "capped". $4.50 capped. What
    >>do
    >>they mean please? These are pages of answers to questions, but I can't
    >>find
    >>an answer to that. It's 33 cents a minute, I think.
    >>
    >>There used to be special prices at different times, but I can't see
    >>anything
    >>about that either, on their website.
    >>It's from a home phone, not a mobile.
    >>
    >>Thank you
    >>Geopelia

    >
    > I think it means your call will cost 33 cents a minute up to a maximum
    > of $4.50 for a call of UP TO two hours.




    Thanks to all, that clears it up.

    But who on earth would want to stay on the phone for two hours?

    And it's a bit confusing. $0.33 is 33 cents, isn't it? You are up to $4.50
    after 14 minutes.
    So after 14 minutes, you can just waffle on for up to two hours for free?
    Get the whole family lined up!

    Geopelia


    Unless a whole big family lines up in turn.
    Geopelia, Mar 20, 2012
    #4
  5. Geopelia

    John S Guest

    On Tue, 20 Mar 2012 10:20:27 +1300, Geopelia wrote:

    > We want to phone UK and Telecom talks about "capped". $4.50 capped. What do
    > they mean please? These are pages of answers to questions, but I can't find
    > an answer to that. It's 33 cents a minute, I think.
    >
    > There used to be special prices at different times, but I can't see anything
    > about that either, on their website.
    > It's from a home phone, not a mobile.
    >
    > Thank you
    > Geopelia


    As others have said, this means that you pay 33 cents per minute until
    you've spent $4.50, then you pay no more.

    However, if you regularly call the UK, I suggest that you buy a Compass
    "Kia Ora" phone card from your local dairy and load, say, $10 on it.

    You will be able to call anywhere in NZ, Australia, UK for (I think the
    current rate is) 2.9 cents per minute including gst. Several other
    destination cost the same rate.

    Telecom capped rate will cost you $4.50 for about 14 minutes, then extra
    time is free.
    But if you want to talk for 14 minutes, the phone card will cost just over
    40 cents. To spend $4.50 on the card you would need to talk for about 2.5
    hours.

    Get the brochure at the same time, which explains the various features.

    We have the compass access number and our card's code number programmed
    into our phone (you can do this with most modern phones), and the numbers
    of regularly called family stored in the card company's system.

    So, after being asked to dial in the number we want to call, we just enter
    1# or 2# or 3# depending on which of our offspring we want to talk to.

    Voice quality is good - I've never been able to detect any difference
    between the phone card and Telecom's direct system.

    Cheers,

    John S
    John S, Mar 20, 2012
    #5
  6. Geopelia

    Enkidu Guest

    On 20/03/12 18:22, John S wrote:
    > On Tue, 20 Mar 2012 10:20:27 +1300, Geopelia wrote:
    >
    >> We want to phone UK and Telecom talks about "capped". $4.50 capped. What do
    >> they mean please? These are pages of answers to questions, but I can't find
    >> an answer to that. It's 33 cents a minute, I think.
    >>
    >> There used to be special prices at different times, but I can't see anything
    >> about that either, on their website.
    >> It's from a home phone, not a mobile.
    >>
    >> Thank you
    >> Geopelia

    >
    > As others have said, this means that you pay 33 cents per minute until
    > you've spent $4.50, then you pay no more.
    >
    > However, if you regularly call the UK, I suggest that you buy a Compass
    > "Kia Ora" phone card from your local dairy and load, say, $10 on it.
    >
    > You will be able to call anywhere in NZ, Australia, UK for (I think the
    > current rate is) 2.9 cents per minute including gst. Several other
    > destination cost the same rate.
    >
    > Telecom capped rate will cost you $4.50 for about 14 minutes, then extra
    > time is free.
    > But if you want to talk for 14 minutes, the phone card will cost just over
    > 40 cents. To spend $4.50 on the card you would need to talk for about 2.5
    > hours.
    >
    > Get the brochure at the same time, which explains the various features.
    >
    > We have the compass access number and our card's code number programmed
    > into our phone (you can do this with most modern phones), and the numbers
    > of regularly called family stored in the card company's system.
    >
    > So, after being asked to dial in the number we want to call, we just enter
    > 1# or 2# or 3# depending on which of our offspring we want to talk to.
    >
    > Voice quality is good - I've never been able to detect any difference
    > between the phone card and Telecom's direct system.
    >

    Aren't they resellers? I believe that you use the same phone system.

    Cheers,

    Cliff

    --

    The ends justifies the means - Niccolò di Bernardo dei Machiavelli.

    The end excuses any evil - Sophocles
    Enkidu, Mar 20, 2012
    #6
  7. Geopelia

    Geopelia Guest

    "John S" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Tue, 20 Mar 2012 10:20:27 +1300, Geopelia wrote:
    >
    >> We want to phone UK and Telecom talks about "capped". $4.50 capped. What
    >> do
    >> they mean please? These are pages of answers to questions, but I can't
    >> find
    >> an answer to that. It's 33 cents a minute, I think.
    >>
    >> There used to be special prices at different times, but I can't see
    >> anything
    >> about that either, on their website.
    >> It's from a home phone, not a mobile.
    >>
    >> Thank you
    >> Geopelia

    >
    > As others have said, this means that you pay 33 cents per minute until
    > you've spent $4.50, then you pay no more.
    >
    > However, if you regularly call the UK, I suggest that you buy a Compass
    > "Kia Ora" phone card from your local dairy and load, say, $10 on it.
    >
    > You will be able to call anywhere in NZ, Australia, UK for (I think the
    > current rate is) 2.9 cents per minute including gst. Several other
    > destination cost the same rate.
    >
    > Telecom capped rate will cost you $4.50 for about 14 minutes, then extra
    > time is free.
    > But if you want to talk for 14 minutes, the phone card will cost just over
    > 40 cents. To spend $4.50 on the card you would need to talk for about 2.5
    > hours.
    >
    > Get the brochure at the same time, which explains the various features.
    >
    > We have the compass access number and our card's code number programmed
    > into our phone (you can do this with most modern phones), and the numbers
    > of regularly called family stored in the card company's system.
    >
    > So, after being asked to dial in the number we want to call, we just enter
    > 1# or 2# or 3# depending on which of our offspring we want to talk to.
    >
    > Voice quality is good - I've never been able to detect any difference
    > between the phone card and Telecom's direct system.
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > John S



    Thank you.

    I've got the phone and the computer's broadband on the same plan. I don't
    think our phone uses cards, aren't they for mobile phones only?

    We don't usually phone UK, we just use email.

    Geopelia
    Geopelia, Mar 20, 2012
    #7
  8. Geopelia

    Dave Taylor Guest

    "Geopelia" <> wrote in news:jk8jt1$atk$:

    > Get the whole family lined up!


    I used to have my girlfriend call me when I was at a house party. We just
    passed the phone around after having a good chat :) It is good when you
    have people to hand off to and also some stuff to discuss.

    --
    Ciao, Dave
    Dave Taylor, Mar 20, 2012
    #8
  9. Geopelia

    Enkidu Guest

    On 20/03/12 23:33, Geopelia wrote:
    > "John S"<> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> On Tue, 20 Mar 2012 10:20:27 +1300, Geopelia wrote:
    >>
    >>> We want to phone UK and Telecom talks about "capped". $4.50 capped. What
    >>> do
    >>> they mean please? These are pages of answers to questions, but I can't
    >>> find
    >>> an answer to that. It's 33 cents a minute, I think.
    >>>
    >>> There used to be special prices at different times, but I can't see
    >>> anything
    >>> about that either, on their website.
    >>> It's from a home phone, not a mobile.
    >>>
    >>> Thank you
    >>> Geopelia

    >>
    >> As others have said, this means that you pay 33 cents per minute until
    >> you've spent $4.50, then you pay no more.
    >>
    >> However, if you regularly call the UK, I suggest that you buy a Compass
    >> "Kia Ora" phone card from your local dairy and load, say, $10 on it.
    >>
    >> You will be able to call anywhere in NZ, Australia, UK for (I think the
    >> current rate is) 2.9 cents per minute including gst. Several other
    >> destination cost the same rate.
    >>
    >> Telecom capped rate will cost you $4.50 for about 14 minutes, then extra
    >> time is free.
    >> But if you want to talk for 14 minutes, the phone card will cost just over
    >> 40 cents. To spend $4.50 on the card you would need to talk for about 2.5
    >> hours.
    >>
    >> Get the brochure at the same time, which explains the various features.
    >>
    >> We have the compass access number and our card's code number programmed
    >> into our phone (you can do this with most modern phones), and the numbers
    >> of regularly called family stored in the card company's system.
    >>
    >> So, after being asked to dial in the number we want to call, we just enter
    >> 1# or 2# or 3# depending on which of our offspring we want to talk to.
    >>
    >> Voice quality is good - I've never been able to detect any difference
    >> between the phone card and Telecom's direct system.

    >
    > Thank you.
    >
    > I've got the phone and the computer's broadband on the same plan. I don't
    > think our phone uses cards, aren't they for mobile phones only?
    >

    No, they are not cards that you insert into your phone. They are cards
    with a number which you enter into the land line phone (and maybe
    cellphones too) before the phone number that you dial. It switches
    somewhere in the network to send your call through the provider's
    network rather than the telcos.

    Cheers,

    Cliff

    --

    The ends justifies the means - Niccolò di Bernardo dei Machiavelli.

    The end excuses any evil - Sophocles
    Enkidu, Mar 20, 2012
    #9
  10. Geopelia

    Geopelia Guest

    "Enkidu" <cliffp@bogus> wrote in message
    news:4f68e799$...
    > On 20/03/12 23:33, Geopelia wrote:
    >> "John S"<> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> On Tue, 20 Mar 2012 10:20:27 +1300, Geopelia wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> We want to phone UK and Telecom talks about "capped". $4.50 capped.
    >>>> What
    >>>> do
    >>>> they mean please? These are pages of answers to questions, but I can't
    >>>> find
    >>>> an answer to that. It's 33 cents a minute, I think.
    >>>>
    >>>> There used to be special prices at different times, but I can't see
    >>>> anything
    >>>> about that either, on their website.
    >>>> It's from a home phone, not a mobile.
    >>>>
    >>>> Thank you
    >>>> Geopelia
    >>>
    >>> As others have said, this means that you pay 33 cents per minute until
    >>> you've spent $4.50, then you pay no more.
    >>>
    >>> However, if you regularly call the UK, I suggest that you buy a Compass
    >>> "Kia Ora" phone card from your local dairy and load, say, $10 on it.
    >>>
    >>> You will be able to call anywhere in NZ, Australia, UK for (I think the
    >>> current rate is) 2.9 cents per minute including gst. Several other
    >>> destination cost the same rate.
    >>>
    >>> Telecom capped rate will cost you $4.50 for about 14 minutes, then extra
    >>> time is free.
    >>> But if you want to talk for 14 minutes, the phone card will cost just
    >>> over
    >>> 40 cents. To spend $4.50 on the card you would need to talk for about
    >>> 2.5
    >>> hours.
    >>>
    >>> Get the brochure at the same time, which explains the various features.
    >>>
    >>> We have the compass access number and our card's code number programmed
    >>> into our phone (you can do this with most modern phones), and the
    >>> numbers
    >>> of regularly called family stored in the card company's system.
    >>>
    >>> So, after being asked to dial in the number we want to call, we just
    >>> enter
    >>> 1# or 2# or 3# depending on which of our offspring we want to talk to.
    >>>
    >>> Voice quality is good - I've never been able to detect any difference
    >>> between the phone card and Telecom's direct system.

    >>
    >> Thank you.
    >>
    >> I've got the phone and the computer's broadband on the same plan. I don't
    >> think our phone uses cards, aren't they for mobile phones only?
    >>

    > No, they are not cards that you insert into your phone. They are cards
    > with a number which you enter into the land line phone (and maybe
    > cellphones too) before the phone number that you dial. It switches
    > somewhere in the network to send your call through the provider's network
    > rather than the telcos.
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Cliff


    Thank you. I'll save that in case we ever start phoning overseas regularly.
    Just now it's about once a year.
    Geopelia, Mar 20, 2012
    #10
  11. Geopelia

    Gordon Guest

    On 2012-03-20, Geopelia <> wrote:
    [snip]
    >
    > I've got the phone and the computer's broadband on the same plan. I don't
    > think our phone uses cards, aren't they for mobile phones only?
    >
    > We don't usually phone UK, we just use email.
    >

    Which is why Telecom wants you to call the UK more often, as it is more
    profitable for them. They want one to get used to the idea that $4.50, which
    is less than $5, is a great value to call the other side of the world. Which
    is rather silly when, for instance this message goes to Germany before being
    sent on, and I get heaps of data, from where ever it is on the planet for
    the same price.
    Gordon, Mar 21, 2012
    #11
  12. Geopelia

    Gordon Guest

    On 2012-03-20, Enkidu <cliffp@bogus> wrote:
    [snip]
    >>

    > Aren't they resellers? I believe that you use the same phone system.
    >

    Wh really cares? Same quality at a much lower price. Yes I expect that the
    some lines/hardware are used.

    Brings up the question if they can do it for 2.9cents then Telecoms 33 cents
    is a bit of a rip off. Well, why they can offer the $4.50 cap.
    Gordon, Mar 21, 2012
    #12
  13. Geopelia

    Geopelia Guest

    "Gordon" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On 2012-03-20, Geopelia <> wrote:
    > [snip]
    >>
    >> I've got the phone and the computer's broadband on the same plan. I don't
    >> think our phone uses cards, aren't they for mobile phones only?
    >>
    >> We don't usually phone UK, we just use email.
    >>

    > Which is why Telecom wants you to call the UK more often, as it is more
    > profitable for them. They want one to get used to the idea that $4.50,
    > which
    > is less than $5, is a great value to call the other side of the world.
    > Which
    > is rather silly when, for instance this message goes to Germany before
    > being
    > sent on, and I get heaps of data, from where ever it is on the planet for
    > the same price.


    Of course it depends how much money one has to live on. It could be worth it
    now and then to hear somebody's voice, which is why we phone sometimes. But
    just for day to day communication email is good enough - and much better
    than snail mail.
    Geopelia, Mar 21, 2012
    #13
  14. Geopelia

    Enkidu Guest

    On 21/03/12 16:52, Gordon wrote:
    > On 2012-03-20, Enkidu<cliffp@bogus> wrote: [snip]
    >>>

    >> Aren't they resellers? I believe that you use the same phone
    >> system.
    >>

    > Who really cares? Same quality at a much lower price. Yes I expect
    > that the some lines/hardware are used.
    >

    Someone expressed surprise that the quality was the same as through the
    normal channels.
    >
    > Brings up the question if they can do it for 2.9cents then Telecoms
    > 33 cents is a bit of a rip off. Well, why they can offer the $4.50
    > cap.
    >

    Compass are selling 'bandwidth' that Telecom would not normally sell, If
    too many people start to use Compass and similar services or Skype
    Telecom will lower prices and probably increase prices to resellers.

    Cheers,

    Cliff

    --

    The ends justifies the means - Niccolò di Bernardo dei Machiavelli.

    The end excuses any evil - Sophocles
    Enkidu, Mar 21, 2012
    #14
  15. On Wed, 21 Mar 2012 18:17:07 +1300, Geopelia wrote:

    > "Gordon" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> On 2012-03-20, Geopelia <> wrote:
    >> [snip]
    >>>
    >>> I've got the phone and the computer's broadband on the same plan. I don't
    >>> think our phone uses cards, aren't they for mobile phones only?
    >>>
    >>> We don't usually phone UK, we just use email.
    >>>

    >> Which is why Telecom wants you to call the UK more often, as it is more
    >> profitable for them. They want one to get used to the idea that $4.50,
    >> which
    >> is less than $5, is a great value to call the other side of the world.
    >> Which
    >> is rather silly when, for instance this message goes to Germany before
    >> being
    >> sent on, and I get heaps of data, from where ever it is on the planet for
    >> the same price.

    >
    > Of course it depends how much money one has to live on. It could be worth it
    > now and then to hear somebody's voice, which is why we phone sometimes. But
    > just for day to day communication email is good enough - and much better
    > than snail mail.



    If the person you are calling has a computer and broadband and you have the
    same you could also use skype

    skype allows you to use your computer like a phone you just need a
    microphone at each end and you can chat for free, and its not that hard to
    use.
    Robin Halligan, Mar 21, 2012
    #15
  16. Geopelia

    Geopelia Guest

    "Robin Halligan" <> wrote in message
    news:bdgjkotuo78e.1kj2uzqzvj185$...
    > On Wed, 21 Mar 2012 18:17:07 +1300, Geopelia wrote:
    >
    >> "Gordon" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> On 2012-03-20, Geopelia <> wrote:
    >>> [snip]
    >>>>
    >>>> I've got the phone and the computer's broadband on the same plan. I
    >>>> don't
    >>>> think our phone uses cards, aren't they for mobile phones only?
    >>>>
    >>>> We don't usually phone UK, we just use email.
    >>>>
    >>> Which is why Telecom wants you to call the UK more often, as it is more
    >>> profitable for them. They want one to get used to the idea that $4.50,
    >>> which
    >>> is less than $5, is a great value to call the other side of the world.
    >>> Which
    >>> is rather silly when, for instance this message goes to Germany before
    >>> being
    >>> sent on, and I get heaps of data, from where ever it is on the planet
    >>> for
    >>> the same price.

    >>
    >> Of course it depends how much money one has to live on. It could be worth
    >> it
    >> now and then to hear somebody's voice, which is why we phone sometimes.
    >> But
    >> just for day to day communication email is good enough - and much better
    >> than snail mail.

    >
    >
    > If the person you are calling has a computer and broadband and you have
    > the
    > same you could also use skype
    >
    > skype allows you to use your computer like a phone you just need a
    > microphone at each end and you can chat for free, and its not that hard to
    > use.
    >


    That might be an idea. Now I send the email to her son, and he phones it to
    her. He sends her email to us.

    She used to email us herself, but then got a laptop and couldn't manage
    using it for emails. It seems there are a few more steps which make it
    complicated for elderly folks. Her email used to get lost when she tried to
    send it.
    I just press "send" from my computer.

    The marvels of modern technology!
    (Mine is 11 years old, still on XP).
    Geopelia, Mar 21, 2012
    #16
  17. Geopelia

    John S Guest

    On Tue, 20 Mar 2012 23:33:36 +1300, Geopelia wrote:

    > "John S" <> wrote in message

    snip
    >>
    >> However, if you regularly call the UK, I suggest that you buy a Compass
    >> "Kia Ora" phone card from your local dairy and load, say, $10 on it.
    >>
    >> You will be able to call anywhere in NZ, Australia, UK for (I think the
    >> current rate is) 2.9 cents per minute including gst. Several other
    >> destination cost the same rate.
    >>
    >> Telecom capped rate will cost you $4.50 for about 14 minutes, then extra
    >> time is free.
    >> But if you want to talk for 14 minutes, the phone card will cost just over
    >> 40 cents. To spend $4.50 on the card you would need to talk for about 2.5
    >> hours.
    >>
    >> Get the brochure at the same time, which explains the various features.
    >>
    >> We have the compass access number and our card's code number programmed
    >> into our phone (you can do this with most modern phones), and the numbers
    >> of regularly called family stored in the card company's system.
    >>
    >> So, after being asked to dial in the number we want to call, we just enter
    >> 1# or 2# or 3# depending on which of our offspring we want to talk to.
    >>
    >> Voice quality is good - I've never been able to detect any difference
    >> between the phone card and Telecom's direct system.
    >>
    >> Cheers,
    >>
    >> John S

    >
    >
    > Thank you.
    >
    > I've got the phone and the computer's broadband on the same plan. I don't
    > think our phone uses cards, aren't they for mobile phones only?
    >
    > We don't usually phone UK, we just use email.
    >
    > Geopelia


    Sorry, I should have explained better.

    You can use the phone card with any phone (even make calls from someone
    else's phone if you are away from home).

    What you get with the card is a code number specific to that card, plus a
    list of "access numbers" from which you select the one for your
    geographical area. For example, our access number is the one we dial in
    the Whakatane area to get into the Compass system.

    If you were away from home, in another city, you would just look up the
    access number for that city and use it.

    After dialling the access number, you are asked (by a robot voice) to key
    in the code number for your card on the phone's dial pad, then you are
    asked to dial the number you want to call. The system tells you the cost
    per minute (2.9 cents per minute in our case if calling the UK), and the
    amount of time you can talk, based on the remaining balance on your card.

    Obviously this requires more dialling than if you were just using the
    Telecom system, but once you have it programmed in to your phone it is just
    a matter of pushing a couple of buttons.

    As you have your phone service with Telecom, any call you made with the
    card would be regarded by Telecom as a local call to your local Compass
    access number (that is why Compass have a list of access numbers for round
    the country, so all their customers can access their service as a local
    call).

    I believe Compass transfer the calls off the Telecom system and onto VOIP -
    ie carry the calls over the internet protocol. In the early days, VOIP
    qualilty sometimes wasn't the best, but it seems to be excellent these
    days.

    With our card, I just call up the Compass system and use my credit card to
    top up the balance now and again. I never put more than $10 at a time on
    the card, and $10 seems to last us for ages.

    cheers,

    John S
    John S, Mar 22, 2012
    #17
  18. Geopelia

    Geopelia Guest

    "John S" <> wrote in message
    news:eek:yek9w23jeu2$.1itcfsv876m11$...
    > On Tue, 20 Mar 2012 23:33:36 +1300, Geopelia wrote:
    >
    >> "John S" <> wrote in message

    > snip
    >>>
    >>> However, if you regularly call the UK, I suggest that you buy a Compass
    >>> "Kia Ora" phone card from your local dairy and load, say, $10 on it.
    >>>
    >>> You will be able to call anywhere in NZ, Australia, UK for (I think the
    >>> current rate is) 2.9 cents per minute including gst. Several other
    >>> destination cost the same rate.
    >>>
    >>> Telecom capped rate will cost you $4.50 for about 14 minutes, then extra
    >>> time is free.
    >>> But if you want to talk for 14 minutes, the phone card will cost just
    >>> over
    >>> 40 cents. To spend $4.50 on the card you would need to talk for about
    >>> 2.5
    >>> hours.
    >>>
    >>> Get the brochure at the same time, which explains the various features.
    >>>
    >>> We have the compass access number and our card's code number programmed
    >>> into our phone (you can do this with most modern phones), and the
    >>> numbers
    >>> of regularly called family stored in the card company's system.
    >>>
    >>> So, after being asked to dial in the number we want to call, we just
    >>> enter
    >>> 1# or 2# or 3# depending on which of our offspring we want to talk to.
    >>>
    >>> Voice quality is good - I've never been able to detect any difference
    >>> between the phone card and Telecom's direct system.
    >>>
    >>> Cheers,
    >>>
    >>> John S

    >>
    >>
    >> Thank you.
    >>
    >> I've got the phone and the computer's broadband on the same plan. I don't
    >> think our phone uses cards, aren't they for mobile phones only?
    >>
    >> We don't usually phone UK, we just use email.
    >>
    >> Geopelia

    >
    > Sorry, I should have explained better.
    >
    > You can use the phone card with any phone (even make calls from someone
    > else's phone if you are away from home).
    >
    > What you get with the card is a code number specific to that card, plus a
    > list of "access numbers" from which you select the one for your
    > geographical area. For example, our access number is the one we dial in
    > the Whakatane area to get into the Compass system.
    >
    > If you were away from home, in another city, you would just look up the
    > access number for that city and use it.
    >
    > After dialling the access number, you are asked (by a robot voice) to key
    > in the code number for your card on the phone's dial pad, then you are
    > asked to dial the number you want to call. The system tells you the cost
    > per minute (2.9 cents per minute in our case if calling the UK), and the
    > amount of time you can talk, based on the remaining balance on your card.
    >
    > Obviously this requires more dialling than if you were just using the
    > Telecom system, but once you have it programmed in to your phone it is
    > just
    > a matter of pushing a couple of buttons.
    >
    > As you have your phone service with Telecom, any call you made with the
    > card would be regarded by Telecom as a local call to your local Compass
    > access number (that is why Compass have a list of access numbers for round
    > the country, so all their customers can access their service as a local
    > call).
    >
    > I believe Compass transfer the calls off the Telecom system and onto
    > VOIP -
    > ie carry the calls over the internet protocol. In the early days, VOIP
    > qualilty sometimes wasn't the best, but it seems to be excellent these
    > days.
    >
    > With our card, I just call up the Compass system and use my credit card to
    > top up the balance now and again. I never put more than $10 at a time on
    > the card, and $10 seems to last us for ages.
    >
    > cheers,
    >
    > John S


    Thank you, I'll save that. If we start making a lot of calls it could be
    useful.

    Geopelia
    Geopelia, Mar 22, 2012
    #18
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