phone line splitter

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by eddy long, Aug 14, 2005.

  1. eddy long

    eddy long Guest

    Hello all,
    We have two PC's and one dedicated phone line for internet dial up access.

    We do not have access to T-1 or DSL.

    Can we have both computers online simultaneously using a phone line
    spiltter?

    Thank you.
    Eddy
     
    eddy long, Aug 14, 2005
    #1
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  2. eddy long wrote:
    > Hello all,
    > We have two PC's and one dedicated phone line for internet dial up
    > access.
    >
    > We do not have access to T-1 or DSL.
    >
    > Can we have both computers online simultaneously using a phone line
    > spiltter?
    >
    > Thank you.
    > Eddy


    This newsgroup is dedicated to digital photography.

    I suggest you may have more luck finding an valid answer to your
    question in a newsgroup relating to on-line communications or general
    computer questions like annexcafe.general.user2user


    --
    Joseph Meehan

    Dia duit
     
    Joseph Meehan, Aug 14, 2005
    #2
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  3. eddy long

    Rudy Benner Guest

    No.

    "eddy long" <eddylong@boloney!_NOSPAM_.net> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hello all,
    > We have two PC's and one dedicated phone line for internet dial up access.
    >
    > We do not have access to T-1 or DSL.
    >
    > Can we have both computers online simultaneously using a phone line
    > spiltter?
    >
    > Thank you.
    > Eddy
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
     
    Rudy Benner, Aug 14, 2005
    #3
  4. eddy long

    Charlie Choc Guest

    On Sun, 14 Aug 2005 10:15:13 -0400, "eddy long" <eddylong@boloney!_NOSPAM_.net>
    wrote:

    >Hello all,
    >We have two PC's and one dedicated phone line for internet dial up access.
    >
    >We do not have access to T-1 or DSL.
    >
    >Can we have both computers online simultaneously using a phone line
    >spiltter?
    >

    No. You could have one or the other, but not both. You could get a couple of
    network cards and a hub and use Internet connection sharing to have both online
    through dial up on one of them, though.
    --
    Charlie...
    http://www.chocphoto.com
     
    Charlie Choc, Aug 14, 2005
    #4
  5. eddy long

    Guest

    My wife and I each have a computer and we use what is called Broadband
    here in the UK, via a Wireless router and using a phone line
    splitter.We can both be online simaltaneously, connected to different
    websites - and if a phone call comes in we can take it without
    interrupting either connection!

    Denis Boisclair
    Cheshire, UK
     
    , Aug 14, 2005
    #5
  6. eddy long

    wilt Guest

    Eddy,
    Modems use tones to send data across voice lines. You cannot
    'split' a voice line to support two modems simultaneously. A phone
    line can be 'split' into voice and DSL, if your phone company offers
    that. Where I live, SBC provides that capability, and we use the phone
    DSL for high speed and simultaneous voice capability, not a cable
    modem.

    --Wilt
     
    wilt, Aug 14, 2005
    #6
  7. eddy long

    pltrgyst Guest

    On 14 Aug 2005 12:02:52 -0700, wrote:

    >My wife and I each have a computer and we use what is called Broadband
    >here in the UK, via a Wireless router and using a phone line
    >splitter.We can both be online simaltaneously, connected to different
    >websites - and if a phone call comes in we can take it without
    >interrupting either connection!


    So can every other xDSL user in the world, but that has nothing at all to do
    with the OP's question concerning dial-up access.

    -- larry
     
    pltrgyst, Aug 14, 2005
    #7
  8. eddy long

    Charlie Choc Guest

    On 14 Aug 2005 12:02:52 -0700, wrote:

    >My wife and I each have a computer and we use what is called Broadband
    >here in the UK, via a Wireless router and using a phone line
    >splitter.We can both be online simaltaneously, connected to different
    >websites - and if a phone call comes in we can take it without
    >interrupting either connection!
    >

    That isn't dial-up access, though, that's what is called DSL or ADSL in the US.
    --
    Charlie...
    http://www.chocphoto.com
     
    Charlie Choc, Aug 14, 2005
    #8
  9. eddy long

    Jer Guest

    eddy long wrote:
    > Hello all,
    > We have two PC's and one dedicated phone line for internet dial up access.
    >
    > We do not have access to T-1 or DSL.
    >
    > Can we have both computers online simultaneously using a phone line
    > spiltter?
    >
    > Thank you.
    > Eddy



    Aside from the odd request in a group not intended for this topic, I
    wasn't going to respond. However, in the interest of providing accurate
    information for those that may not be aware of all the choices, I'll say
    that yes, it is possible - but not necessarily the way you may be thinking.

    There are SOHO network routers that also have a built-in modem, or
    better, a serial comm port for an external modem connection. This type
    of equipment is great for locations with multiple PC systems each
    needing to share internet access, but don't have access to broadband
    service. What this router can do is automatically establish a dial-up
    analog or ISDN internet connection only when a demand for it occurs,
    aka. on-demand dialing. The router (like most SOHO routers) manages two
    networks, one local (LAN) and another remote (WAN) - the modem
    represents the WAN portion. The router is custom programmed with the
    dialing instructions, and an external WAN connection is established
    automatically when requested by network activity. Otherwise, the modem
    is idle while the router continues to manage the LAN services between
    the locally connected PC systems. The "internet sharing" function is
    managed internally by the router, not the modem nor the phone line.
    However, one caveat for this type of service is, with all the automagic
    stuff happening inside a PC, I'm afraid the phone line would need to be
    dedicated line not shared with voice service because it would never hang
    up - and it's still brutally slow in a broadband world.

    This type of network equipment isn't very popular, but is still
    available for those who need it. Do a google for "dial-on-demand
    router" and see what pops up. I seem to recall one product that even
    offered WiFi on the LAN side. And as others have already intimated,
    submitting your query in a more appropriate group should prove even more
    helpful. Luck to you.


    --
    jer
    email reply - I am not a 'ten'
     
    Jer, Aug 14, 2005
    #9
  10. eddy long

    Matt Ion Guest

    Jer wrote:

    > eddy long wrote:
    >
    >> Hello all,
    >> We have two PC's and one dedicated phone line for internet dial up
    >> access.
    >>
    >> We do not have access to T-1 or DSL.
    >>
    >> Can we have both computers online simultaneously using a phone line
    >> spiltter?
    >>
    >> Thank you.
    >> Eddy

    >
    >
    >
    > Aside from the odd request in a group not intended for this topic, I
    > wasn't going to respond. However, in the interest of providing accurate
    > information for those that may not be aware of all the choices, I'll say
    > that yes, it is possible - but not necessarily the way you may be thinking.
    >
    > There are SOHO network routers that also have a built-in modem, or
    > better, a serial comm port for an external modem connection. This type
    > of equipment is great for locations with multiple PC systems each
    > needing to share internet access, but don't have access to broadband
    > service. What this router can do is automatically establish a dial-up
    > analog or ISDN internet connection only when a demand for it occurs,
    > aka. on-demand dialing. The router (like most SOHO routers) manages two
    > networks, one local (LAN) and another remote (WAN) - the modem
    > represents the WAN portion. The router is custom programmed with the
    > dialing instructions, and an external WAN connection is established
    > automatically when requested by network activity. Otherwise, the modem
    > is idle while the router continues to manage the LAN services between
    > the locally connected PC systems. The "internet sharing" function is
    > managed internally by the router, not the modem nor the phone line.
    > However, one caveat for this type of service is, with all the automagic
    > stuff happening inside a PC, I'm afraid the phone line would need to be
    > dedicated line not shared with voice service because it would never hang
    > up - and it's still brutally slow in a broadband world.
    >
    > This type of network equipment isn't very popular, but is still
    > available for those who need it. Do a google for "dial-on-demand
    > router" and see what pops up. I seem to recall one product that even
    > offered WiFi on the LAN side. And as others have already intimated,
    > submitting your query in a more appropriate group should prove even more
    > helpful. Luck to you.


    All excellent advice, but one other possible method to keep in mind is
    that if you're running Windows XP, you have fairly effective and
    easy-to-configure internet sharing already available - all you need to
    do is connect the two computers together using some home-networking
    connection.

    Most common would be a network card in each machine (or onboard ethernet
    on most newer motherboards) connected together with a crossover network
    cable, or via a hub/switch with standard cables.

    Some machines also support networking via USB (A-to-A USB cables are
    available for this purpose). If you have an old LapLink cable or
    crossover serial cable, XP also supports PC-to-PC networking that way.

    Once the two machines can communicate with each other, plug one
    machine's modem into the phone line, set up dialing on that system, and
    set up the Internet Sharing feature.

    It's not a great solution - if the "shared" computer crashes or needs to
    reboot, the other computer loses its connection as well. A separate
    router with dialup or serial port is preferable, and makes it easy to
    add more machines later.


    ---
    avast! Antivirus: Outbound message clean.
    Virus Database (VPS): 0532-6, 08/13/2005
    Tested on: 8/15/2005 2:11:23 AM
    avast! - copyright (c) 1988-2005 ALWIL Software.
    http://www.avast.com
     
    Matt Ion, Aug 15, 2005
    #10
  11. eddy long

    Shawn Hirn Guest

    In article <>,
    "eddy long" <eddylong@boloney!_NOSPAM_.net> wrote:

    > Hello all,
    > We have two PC's and one dedicated phone line for internet dial up access.
    >
    > We do not have access to T-1 or DSL.
    >
    > Can we have both computers online simultaneously using a phone line
    > spiltter?


    No.
     
    Shawn Hirn, Aug 15, 2005
    #11
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