Permissions on a USB external HDD

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by SchoolTech, Oct 9, 2006.

  1. SchoolTech

    SchoolTech Guest

    I have an external USB HDD formatted in a 40 GB NTFS partition.

    How do I set permissions so that in any computer I take it to, whatever
    username, whatever domain I am logged onto in that computer, I will
    automatically have full permissions on the external drive?

    Does the Everyone group mean the same thing on any computer?
    SchoolTech, Oct 9, 2006
    #1
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  2. In message <452aa78c$>, SchoolTech wrote:

    > I have an external USB HDD formatted in a 40 GB NTFS partition.
    >
    > How do I set permissions so that in any computer I take it to, whatever
    > username, whatever domain I am logged onto in that computer, I will
    > automatically have full permissions on the external drive?


    On a Linux system, according to the mount(8) man page, you can set the uid,
    gid and umask mount options so that non-root users can access the files.
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Oct 10, 2006
    #2
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  3. SchoolTech

    Dave Taylor Guest

    SchoolTech <> wrote in news:452aa78c$1
    @clear.net.nz:

    > I have an external USB HDD formatted in a 40 GB NTFS partition.
    >
    > How do I set permissions so that in any computer I take it to, whatever
    > username, whatever domain I am logged onto in that computer, I will
    > automatically have full permissions on the external drive?
    >
    > Does the Everyone group mean the same thing on any computer?


    Just reformat it to Fat32, that way 9x boxes can see it too (with the
    correct driver for your USB caddy)

    --
    Ciao, Dave
    Dave Taylor, Oct 10, 2006
    #3
  4. SchoolTech

    Peter Nield Guest

    "SchoolTech" <> wrote in message
    news:452aa78c$...
    >I have an external USB HDD formatted in a 40 GB NTFS partition.
    >
    > How do I set permissions so that in any computer I take it to, whatever
    > username, whatever domain I am logged onto in that computer, I will
    > automatically have full permissions on the external drive?
    >
    > Does the Everyone group mean the same thing on any computer?


    The following "objects" have the same "SID" on all Windows computers:
    Administrators
    Users
    Authenticated Users
    Everyone

    So if you want to have a freely accessible NTFS drive, pick one of Users,
    Everyone or Authenticated Users.
    Peter Nield, Oct 10, 2006
    #4
  5. In message <Xns9858B0689D9A7daveytaynospamplshot@203.97.37.6>, Dave Taylor
    wrote:

    > SchoolTech <> wrote in news:452aa78c$1
    > @clear.net.nz:
    >
    >> I have an external USB HDD formatted in a 40 GB NTFS partition.
    >>
    >> How do I set permissions so that in any computer I take it to, whatever
    >> username, whatever domain I am logged onto in that computer, I will
    >> automatically have full permissions on the external drive?
    >>
    >> Does the Everyone group mean the same thing on any computer?

    >
    > Just reformat it to Fat32, that way 9x boxes can see it too (with the
    > correct driver for your USB caddy)


    The only problem with that is limitations on file sizes.
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Oct 10, 2006
    #5
  6. SchoolTech

    SchoolTech Guest

    Dave Taylor wrote:
    > SchoolTech <> wrote in news:452aa78c$1
    > @clear.net.nz:
    >
    >> I have an external USB HDD formatted in a 40 GB NTFS partition.
    >>
    >> How do I set permissions so that in any computer I take it to, whatever
    >> username, whatever domain I am logged onto in that computer, I will
    >> automatically have full permissions on the external drive?
    >>
    >> Does the Everyone group mean the same thing on any computer?

    >
    > Just reformat it to Fat32, that way 9x boxes can see it too (with the
    > correct driver for your USB caddy)
    >

    FAT32 is a complete waste of time, NTFS is miles better
    It can compress and encrypt seamlessly.
    SchoolTech, Oct 11, 2006
    #6
  7. SchoolTech

    Earl Grey Guest

    SchoolTech wrote:
    > Dave Taylor wrote:
    >> SchoolTech <> wrote in news:452aa78c$1
    >> @clear.net.nz:
    >>
    >>> I have an external USB HDD formatted in a 40 GB NTFS partition.
    >>>
    >>> How do I set permissions so that in any computer I take it to,
    >>> whatever username, whatever domain I am logged onto in that computer,
    >>> I will automatically have full permissions on the external drive?
    >>>
    >>> Does the Everyone group mean the same thing on any computer?

    >>
    >> Just reformat it to Fat32, that way 9x boxes can see it too (with the
    >> correct driver for your USB caddy)
    >>

    > FAT32 is a complete waste of time, NTFS is miles better
    > It can compress and encrypt seamlessly.


    But you did say ANY computer.
    Earl Grey, Oct 11, 2006
    #7
  8. SchoolTech

    Dave Taylor Guest

    Earl Grey <> wrote in news:452c7d8f$:

    > But you did say ANY computer.
    >


    That was what I saw too.

    --
    Ciao, Dave
    Dave Taylor, Oct 11, 2006
    #8
  9. SchoolTech

    Enkidu Guest

    Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    > In message <452aa78c$>, SchoolTech wrote:
    >
    >> I have an external USB HDD formatted in a 40 GB NTFS partition.
    >>
    >> How do I set permissions so that in any computer I take it to, whatever
    >> username, whatever domain I am logged onto in that computer, I will
    >> automatically have full permissions on the external drive?

    >
    > On a Linux system, according to the mount(8) man page, you can set the uid,
    > gid and umask mount options so that non-root users can access the files.
    >

    You need to be root to issue the mount command though.

    Cheers,

    Cliff
    Enkidu, Oct 11, 2006
    #9
  10. In message <452cbe92$>, Enkidu wrote:

    > Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >> In message <452aa78c$>, SchoolTech wrote:
    >>
    >>> I have an external USB HDD formatted in a 40 GB NTFS partition.
    >>>
    >>> How do I set permissions so that in any computer I take it to, whatever
    >>> username, whatever domain I am logged onto in that computer, I will
    >>> automatically have full permissions on the external drive?

    >>
    >> On a Linux system, according to the mount(8) man page, you can set the
    >> uid, gid and umask mount options so that non-root users can access the
    >> files.

    >
    > You need to be root to issue the mount command though.


    You can also set up the mount command, as root, so that non-root users can
    issue it.
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Oct 11, 2006
    #10
  11. SchoolTech

    SchoolTech Guest

    Earl Grey wrote:
    > SchoolTech wrote:
    >> Dave Taylor wrote:
    >>> SchoolTech <> wrote in news:452aa78c$1
    >>> @clear.net.nz:
    >>>
    >>>> I have an external USB HDD formatted in a 40 GB NTFS partition.
    >>>>
    >>>> How do I set permissions so that in any computer I take it to,
    >>>> whatever username, whatever domain I am logged onto in that
    >>>> computer, I will automatically have full permissions on the external
    >>>> drive?
    >>>>
    >>>> Does the Everyone group mean the same thing on any computer?
    >>>
    >>> Just reformat it to Fat32, that way 9x boxes can see it too (with the
    >>> correct driver for your USB caddy)
    >>>

    >> FAT32 is a complete waste of time, NTFS is miles better
    >> It can compress and encrypt seamlessly.

    >
    > But you did say ANY computer.


    Any Windows computer. Obviously, NTFS is for Windows.
    SchoolTech, Oct 11, 2006
    #11
  12. SchoolTech

    Earl Grey Guest

    SchoolTech wrote:
    > Earl Grey wrote:
    >> SchoolTech wrote:
    >>> Dave Taylor wrote:
    >>>> SchoolTech <> wrote in news:452aa78c$1
    >>>> @clear.net.nz:
    >>>>
    >>>>> I have an external USB HDD formatted in a 40 GB NTFS partition.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> How do I set permissions so that in any computer I take it to,
    >>>>> whatever username, whatever domain I am logged onto in that
    >>>>> computer, I will automatically have full permissions on the
    >>>>> external drive?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Does the Everyone group mean the same thing on any computer?
    >>>>
    >>>> Just reformat it to Fat32, that way 9x boxes can see it too (with
    >>>> the correct driver for your USB caddy)
    >>>>
    >>> FAT32 is a complete waste of time, NTFS is miles better
    >>> It can compress and encrypt seamlessly.

    >>
    >> But you did say ANY computer.

    >
    > Any Windows computer. Obviously, NTFS is for Windows.


    <shrug>
    So is FAT32, any Windows computer, unlike NTFS
    Earl Grey, Oct 11, 2006
    #12
  13. SchoolTech

    Enkidu Guest

    Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    > In message <452cbe92$>, Enkidu wrote:
    >
    >> Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >>> In message <452aa78c$>, SchoolTech wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> I have an external USB HDD formatted in a 40 GB NTFS partition.
    >>>>
    >>>> How do I set permissions so that in any computer I take it to, whatever
    >>>> username, whatever domain I am logged onto in that computer, I will
    >>>> automatically have full permissions on the external drive?
    >>> On a Linux system, according to the mount(8) man page, you can set the
    >>> uid, gid and umask mount options so that non-root users can access the
    >>> files.

    >> You need to be root to issue the mount command though.

    >
    > You can also set up the mount command, as root, so that non-root users can
    > issue it.
    >

    Yes, but at some stage you would need to edit 'fstab' using root. The
    original poster did not seem to have root/administrator access to the
    box, otherwise he would not have a problem in the first place.

    Cheers,

    Cliff
    Enkidu, Oct 11, 2006
    #13
  14. In message <452d5278$>, SchoolTech wrote:

    > Earl Grey wrote:
    >> SchoolTech wrote:
    >>> Dave Taylor wrote:
    >>>> SchoolTech <> wrote in news:452aa78c$1
    >>>> @clear.net.nz:
    >>>>
    >>>>> I have an external USB HDD formatted in a 40 GB NTFS partition.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> How do I set permissions so that in any computer I take it to,
    >>>>> whatever username, whatever domain I am logged onto in that
    >>>>> computer, I will automatically have full permissions on the external
    >>>>> drive?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Does the Everyone group mean the same thing on any computer?
    >>>>
    >>>> Just reformat it to Fat32, that way 9x boxes can see it too (with the
    >>>> correct driver for your USB caddy)
    >>>>
    >>> FAT32 is a complete waste of time, NTFS is miles better
    >>> It can compress and encrypt seamlessly.

    >>
    >> But you did say ANY computer.

    >
    > Any Windows computer. Obviously, NTFS is for Windows.


    Linux can access NTFS too.
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Oct 11, 2006
    #14
  15. SchoolTech

    jasen Guest

    On 2006-10-11, Enkidu <> wrote:

    >> On a Linux system, according to the mount(8) man page, you can set the uid,
    >> gid and umask mount options so that non-root users can access the files.
    >>

    > You need to be root to issue the mount command though.


    Read that man page. If you list it in /etc/fstab with the user option
    anyone (or the automounter) can mount it.

    Bye.
    Jasen
    jasen, Oct 12, 2006
    #15
  16. In message <egkvvh$8a3$>, jasen wrote:

    > On 2006-10-11, Enkidu <> wrote:
    >
    >>> On a Linux system, according to the mount(8) man page, you can set the
    >>> uid, gid and umask mount options so that non-root users can access the
    >>> files.
    >>>

    >> You need to be root to issue the mount command though.

    >
    > Read that man page. If you list it in /etc/fstab with the user option
    > anyone (or the automounter) can mount it.


    True, but it _is_ worth pointing out that the OP wanted the ability to take
    the drive around to multiple computers, so setting up an fstab line on all
    of them may just be too inconvenient.
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Oct 12, 2006
    #16
  17. SchoolTech

    Dave Taylor Guest

    Earl Grey <> wrote in news:452d5574$:

    >> Any Windows computer. Obviously, NTFS is for Windows.

    >
    > <shrug>
    > So is FAT32, any Windows computer, unlike NTFS
    >


    You want to make your life easier not harder, if you need to use it on a 9x
    box, NTFS adds additional driver issues you don't need. NTFS4DOS.

    --
    Ciao, Dave
    Dave Taylor, Oct 12, 2006
    #17
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