people photos stitching software?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by peter, Mar 1, 2006.

  1. peter

    peter Guest

    If I take several shots of a large group of people, is there a software to
    help me stitch them together?

    The common stitching software for scenary won't work because people moves
    between shots. If you stitch blindly at the photo boundary, you may get half
    a person looking left and the other half looking right. In situation like
    this, you have to take the entire person (or at least the entire head) from
    either one of the photo. I've done this stitching manually; it is very time
    consuming.

    I don't expect the computer to be able to do this fully automatically, since
    software cannot recognize what is half a person and what is an entire
    person. However, computer-assisted stitching maybe possible and could save a
    lot of time.
     
    peter, Mar 1, 2006
    #1
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  2. peter

    Steve Mackie Guest

    > The common stitching software for scenary won't work because people moves
    > between shots. If you stitch blindly at the photo boundary, you may get
    > half a person looking left and the other half looking right. In situation
    > like this, you have to take the entire person (or at least the entire
    > head) from either one of the photo. I've done this stitching manually; it
    > is very time consuming.
    >
    > I don't expect the computer to be able to do this fully automatically,
    > since software cannot recognize what is half a person and what is an
    > entire person. However, computer-assisted stitching maybe possible and
    > could save a lot of time.


    If the person moves, it will never work, not matter what software you use.

    Steve
     
    Steve Mackie, Mar 1, 2006
    #2
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  3. Unless....you go in after the software gives it a go and fix the places
    where it messed up.
     
    Gene Palmiter, Mar 1, 2006
    #3
  4. peter

    Don Wiss Guest

    On Wed, 01 Mar 2006, Steve Mackie <> wrote:

    >> I don't expect the computer to be able to do this fully automatically,
    >> since software cannot recognize what is half a person and what is an
    >> entire person. However, computer-assisted stitching maybe possible and
    >> could save a lot of time.

    >
    >If the person moves, it will never work, not matter what software you use.


    Not true. While I have never done it, if you use software like PTGui you
    can output as multi-layer TIFF and use masks to tell it from which layer to
    get the image. I have seen this described someplace, but I don't recall
    where. I suggest searching the archives of the
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/PanoTools/ list.

    Don <www.donwiss.com/pictures/> (e-mail link at page bottoms).
     
    Don Wiss, Mar 1, 2006
    #4
  5. peter

    Andy Guest

    Don Wiss wrote:
    > Not true. While I have never done it, if you use software like PTGui you
    > can output as multi-layer TIFF and use masks to tell it from which layer
    > to
    > get the image. I have seen this described someplace, but I don't recall
    > where.


    Max Lyons' site?
    http://www.tawbaware.com/ptasmblr_tutorial.htm#seams
     
    Andy, Mar 1, 2006
    #5
  6. peter

    Tom G Guest

    "peter" <> wrote in message
    news:%ngNf.4356$d61.199@trnddc05...
    > If I take several shots of a large group of people, is there a software to
    > help me stitch them together?
    >
    > The common stitching software for scenary won't work because people moves
    > between shots. If you stitch blindly at the photo boundary, you may get
    > half a person looking left and the other half looking right. In situation
    > like this, you have to take the entire person (or at least the entire
    > head) from either one of the photo. I've done this stitching manually; it
    > is very time consuming.
    >
    > I don't expect the computer to be able to do this fully automatically,
    > since software cannot recognize what is half a person and what is an
    > entire person. However, computer-assisted stitching maybe possible and
    > could save a lot of time.
    >


    Not software, but it seems the solution might be to shoot with two identical
    cameras, side by side, at virtually the same moment. Then stitching the
    results into one photo.

    Tom G.
     
    Tom G, Mar 1, 2006
    #6
  7. Tom G wrote:

    > "peter" <> wrote in message
    > news:%ngNf.4356$d61.199@trnddc05...
    >
    >>If I take several shots of a large group of people, is there a software to
    >>help me stitch them together?
    >>
    >>The common stitching software for scenary won't work because people moves
    >>between shots. If you stitch blindly at the photo boundary, you may get
    >>half a person looking left and the other half looking right. In situation
    >>like this, you have to take the entire person (or at least the entire
    >>head) from either one of the photo. I've done this stitching manually; it
    >>is very time consuming.
    >>
    >>I don't expect the computer to be able to do this fully automatically,
    >>since software cannot recognize what is half a person and what is an
    >>entire person. However, computer-assisted stitching maybe possible and
    >>could save a lot of time.
    >>

    >
    >
    > Not software, but it seems the solution might be to shoot with two identical
    > cameras, side by side, at virtually the same moment. Then stitching the
    > results into one photo.
    >


    It's very do-able in software, but neither simple nor easy until after
    you've gone up the learning curve. Look for a local class perhaps.

    --
    John McWilliams
     
    John McWilliams, Mar 1, 2006
    #7
  8. peter bedacht in news:%ngNf.4356$d61.199@trnddc05:

    > If I take several shots of a large group of people, is there a
    > software to help me stitch them together?
    >
    > The common stitching software for scenary won't work because people
    > moves between shots. If you stitch blindly at the photo boundary, you
    > may get half a person looking left and the other half looking right.
    > In situation like this, you have to take the entire person (or at
    > least the entire head) from either one of the photo. I've done this
    > stitching manually; it is very time consuming.
    >
    > I don't expect the computer to be able to do this fully automatically,
    > since software cannot recognize what is half a person and what is an
    > entire person. However, computer-assisted stitching maybe possible and
    > could save a lot of time.
    >
    >

    Stitcher (I use 5.0) by Realviz lets you apply a 'stencil', which is
    basically a mask that you can define on any part of any image. It prevents
    that part from showing up in the final image. I use this function (as it is
    intended) to cover up people or things that have moved between shots. It
    works just fine.


    JL
     
    Justus Lipsius, Mar 1, 2006
    #8
  9. peter

    Scott W Guest

    Don Wiss wrote:
    > On Wed, 01 Mar 2006, Steve Mackie <> wrote:
    >
    > >> I don't expect the computer to be able to do this fully automatically,
    > >> since software cannot recognize what is half a person and what is an
    > >> entire person. However, computer-assisted stitching maybe possible and
    > >> could save a lot of time.

    > >
    > >If the person moves, it will never work, not matter what software you use.

    >
    > Not true. While I have never done it, if you use software like PTGui you
    > can output as multi-layer TIFF and use masks to tell it from which layer to
    > get the image. I have seen this described someplace, but I don't recall
    > where. I suggest searching the archives of the
    > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/PanoTools/ list.
    >

    I do this all the time with PTGui and it works very well. One thing to
    keep in mind when doing this is to get lots of overlap in the photos so
    you have a lot of latitude as to where to put the seams between the
    photos.

    These people were all moving while I was taking the photos. The final
    photo is stitched from 14 photos.

    Scott
     
    Scott W, Mar 1, 2006
    #9
  10. "peter" <> wrote in message
    news:%ngNf.4356$d61.199@trnddc05...
    > If I take several shots of a large group of people, is there a
    > software to help me stitch them together?
    >
    > The common stitching software for scenary won't work because people
    > moves between shots.


    In fact it works quite well, but indeed not on full-auto mode. As long
    as there is a significant overlap you'll get multiple possibilities on
    a useful/eyes-open/facing-the-camera image.

    A possible exception for automatic software is an MS research project
    called "Group shot":
    <http://research.microsoft.com/projects/GroupShot/>

    Bart
     
    Bart van der Wolf, Mar 1, 2006
    #10
  11. peter

    Scott W Guest

    Scott W wrote:
    > Don Wiss wrote:
    > > On Wed, 01 Mar 2006, Steve Mackie <> wrote:
    > >
    > > >> I don't expect the computer to be able to do this fully automatically,
    > > >> since software cannot recognize what is half a person and what is an
    > > >> entire person. However, computer-assisted stitching maybe possible and
    > > >> could save a lot of time.
    > > >
    > > >If the person moves, it will never work, not matter what software you use.

    > >
    > > Not true. While I have never done it, if you use software like PTGui you
    > > can output as multi-layer TIFF and use masks to tell it from which layer to
    > > get the image. I have seen this described someplace, but I don't recall
    > > where. I suggest searching the archives of the
    > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/PanoTools/ list.
    > >

    > I do this all the time with PTGui and it works very well. One thing to
    > keep in mind when doing this is to get lots of overlap in the photos so
    > you have a lot of latitude as to where to put the seams between the
    > photos.
    >
    > These people were all moving while I was taking the photos. The final
    > photo is stitched from 14 photos.
    >
    > Scott

    Shoot, I forgot the link, here it is
    http://www.sewcon.com/temp/pan5_11-12-05.jpg

    Scott
     
    Scott W, Mar 1, 2006
    #11
  12. peter

    secheese Guest

    On Wed, 01 Mar 2006 08:43:25 -0800, John McWilliams
    <> wrote:

    >> Not software, but it seems the solution might be to shoot with two identical
    >> cameras, side by side, at virtually the same moment. Then stitching the
    >> results into one photo.
    >>

    >
    >It's very do-able in software, but neither simple nor easy until after
    >you've gone up the learning curve. Look for a local class perhaps.


    Ahhhh... It's easy! Perhaps slightly beyond basic skills, but not
    requiring a class.
     
    secheese, Mar 2, 2006
    #12
  13. peter

    peter Guest

    "Bart van der Wolf" <> wrote in message
    news:4406216b$0$11065$4all.nl...
    >
    >
    > A possible exception for automatic software is an MS research project
    > called "Group shot":
    > <http://research.microsoft.com/projects/GroupShot/>


    Interesting project. However, you can select only rectangular regions!
    In this type of photos, irregular shaped selection is the rule.
     
    peter, Mar 2, 2006
    #13
  14. "peter" <> wrote in message
    news:ndBNf.12593$XE6.1437@trnddc07...
    > "Bart van der Wolf" <> wrote in message
    > news:4406216b$0$11065$4all.nl...
    >>
    >>
    >> A possible exception for automatic software is an MS research
    >> project called "Group shot":
    >> <http://research.microsoft.com/projects/GroupShot/>

    >
    > Interesting project. However, you can select only rectangular
    > regions!
    > In this type of photos, irregular shaped selection is the rule.


    Try it, it'll automagically figure out what's best inside the
    rectangle you select.

    Bart
     
    Bart van der Wolf, Mar 2, 2006
    #14
  15. peter

    Alan Guest

    Not true Steve, you know the perils of saying never right? I recently
    took a series of shots of a large BMX event

    with LOTS of moving people then stitched them together using Autopan
    Pro. The key is to export the file with

    layers then look for ghosted areas where people have moved between the
    stitched shots and simply erase down to the

    layer where their image is solid. The layered psd file from Autopan Pro
    was large, 754 MB, so it was a little

    ungainly but the resulting panoramic file was fantastic with no movement
    defects. I would post it but with the

    aspect ratio (more than 12 to 1) you wouldn't be able to see any detail
    at a file size proper for posting.Steve Mackie wrote:
    >>The common stitching software for scenary won't work because people moves
    >>between shots. If you stitch blindly at the photo boundary, you may get
    >>half a person looking left and the other half looking right. In situation
    >>like this, you have to take the entire person (or at least the entire
    >>head) from either one of the photo. I've done this stitching manually; it
    >>is very time consuming.
    >>
    >>I don't expect the computer to be able to do this fully automatically,
    >>since software cannot recognize what is half a person and what is an
    >>entire person. However, computer-assisted stitching maybe possible and
    >>could save a lot of time.

    >
    >
    > If the person moves, it will never work, not matter what software you use.
    >
    > Steve
    >
    >
     
    Alan, Jul 19, 2007
    #15
  16. peter

    BaumBadier Guest

    On Thu, 19 Jul 2007 12:17:51 GMT, Alan <> wrote:

    >
    >
    >Not true Steve, you know the perils of saying never right? I recently
    >took a series of shots of a large BMX event
    >
    >with LOTS of moving people then stitched them together using Autopan
    >Pro. The key is to export the file with
    >
    >layers then look for ghosted areas where people have moved between the
    >stitched shots and simply erase down to the
    >
    >layer where their image is solid. The layered psd file from Autopan Pro
    >was large, 754 MB, so it was a little
    >
    >ungainly but the resulting panoramic file was fantastic with no movement
    >defects. I would post it but with the
    >
    >aspect ratio (more than 12 to 1) you wouldn't be able to see any detail
    >at a file size proper for posting.Steve Mackie wrote:
    >>>The common stitching software for scenary won't work because people moves
    >>>between shots. If you stitch blindly at the photo boundary, you may get
    >>>half a person looking left and the other half looking right. In situation
    >>>like this, you have to take the entire person (or at least the entire
    >>>head) from either one of the photo. I've done this stitching manually; it
    >>>is very time consuming.
    >>>
    >>>I don't expect the computer to be able to do this fully automatically,
    >>>since software cannot recognize what is half a person and what is an
    >>>entire person. However, computer-assisted stitching maybe possible and
    >>>could save a lot of time.

    >>
    >>
    >> If the person moves, it will never work, not matter what software you use.
    >>
    >> Steve
    >>
    >>


    Try the "SmartBlend" plugin http://smartblend.panotools.info/ in any of the
    panorama makers that it supports. It automatically finds and corrects these
    problems for you. SmartBlend was designed to correct for severe parallax errors
    with mismatched objects in the foreground and backgrounds, but it works for any
    objects that are very different between the two images. I've used this on a
    hand-held 7-panel panorama of the inside of a tourist shop with thousands of
    objects hanging from the ceiling and rows and rows of shelves of tourist flotsam
    from 3 ft to 50 ft. away from the camera. It blended them all seamlessly, better
    than I could do with the many hours of hand-edited masks and cloning that I used
    at first.
     
    BaumBadier, Jul 19, 2007
    #16
  17. peter

    BaumBadier Guest

    On Thu, 19 Jul 2007 12:44:14 -0500, BaumBadier <> wrote:

    >On Thu, 19 Jul 2007 12:17:51 GMT, Alan <> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>
    >>Not true Steve, you know the perils of saying never right? I recently
    >>took a series of shots of a large BMX event
    >>
    >>with LOTS of moving people then stitched them together using Autopan
    >>Pro. The key is to export the file with
    >>
    >>layers then look for ghosted areas where people have moved between the
    >>stitched shots and simply erase down to the
    >>
    >>layer where their image is solid. The layered psd file from Autopan Pro
    >>was large, 754 MB, so it was a little
    >>
    >>ungainly but the resulting panoramic file was fantastic with no movement
    >>defects. I would post it but with the
    >>
    >>aspect ratio (more than 12 to 1) you wouldn't be able to see any detail
    >>at a file size proper for posting.Steve Mackie wrote:
    >>>>The common stitching software for scenary won't work because people moves
    >>>>between shots. If you stitch blindly at the photo boundary, you may get
    >>>>half a person looking left and the other half looking right. In situation
    >>>>like this, you have to take the entire person (or at least the entire
    >>>>head) from either one of the photo. I've done this stitching manually; it
    >>>>is very time consuming.
    >>>>
    >>>>I don't expect the computer to be able to do this fully automatically,
    >>>>since software cannot recognize what is half a person and what is an
    >>>>entire person. However, computer-assisted stitching maybe possible and
    >>>>could save a lot of time.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> If the person moves, it will never work, not matter what software you use.
    >>>
    >>> Steve
    >>>
    >>>

    >
    >Try the "SmartBlend" plugin http://smartblend.panotools.info/ in any of the
    >panorama makers that it supports. It automatically finds and corrects these
    >problems for you. SmartBlend was designed to correct for severe parallax errors
    >with mismatched objects in the foreground and backgrounds, but it works for any
    >objects that are very different between the two images. I've used this on a
    >hand-held 7-panel panorama of the inside of a tourist shop with thousands of
    >objects hanging from the ceiling and rows and rows of shelves of tourist flotsam
    >from 3 ft to 50 ft. away from the camera. It blended them all seamlessly, better
    >than I could do with the many hours of hand-edited masks and cloning that I used
    >at first.


    BTW: SmartBlend also works with the excellent freeware panorama maker called
    Hugin http://hugin.sourceforge.net/download/ Hugin is not listed on
    SmartBlend's page but SmartBlend is listed on Hugin's page.
     
    BaumBadier, Jul 19, 2007
    #17
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