PCs dumbing your kids down?

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Lawrence D¹Oliveiro, May 24, 2005.

  1. The June PC Authority has a brief report on page 13 about a survey into
    the impact of PCs on children's learning. The survey was done for/by the
    UK Royal Economic Society, and covered 100,000 children in 31 countries.

    The verdict? Those with a PC at home were worse students. However, those
    from homes with 500 books (not sure why that figure) were better
    students. If they didn't use a PC in their education, their literacy and
    numeracy skills were actually better than those who did.

    The PCs were basically stifling the kids' imagination and distracting
    them from their homework with games.
    Lawrence D¹Oliveiro, May 24, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Lawrence D¹Oliveiro

    Jedmeister Guest

    "Lawrence D¹Oliveiro" <_zealand> wrote in message
    news:...
    > The June PC Authority has a brief report on page 13 about a survey into
    > the impact of PCs on children's learning. The survey was done for/by the
    > UK Royal Economic Society, and covered 100,000 children in 31 countries.
    >
    > The verdict? Those with a PC at home were worse students. However, those
    > from homes with 500 books (not sure why that figure) were better
    > students. If they didn't use a PC in their education, their literacy and
    > numeracy skills were actually better than those who did.
    >
    > The PCs were basically stifling the kids' imagination and distracting
    > them from their homework with games.


    I am amazed the education department are handing out expensive laptops to
    teachers. In my opinion these are unneeded for the core job of teaching.
    They will be outdated in several years anyway.
    Jedmeister, May 24, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Lawrence D¹Oliveiro

    Shane Guest

    On Tue, 24 May 2005 21:40:49 +1200, Lawrence D¹Oliveiro wrote:

    > The June PC Authority has a brief report on page 13 about a survey into
    > the impact of PCs on children's learning. The survey was done for/by the
    > UK Royal Economic Society, and covered 100,000 children in 31 countries.
    >
    > The verdict? Those with a PC at home were worse students. However, those
    > from homes with 500 books (not sure why that figure) were better
    > students. If they didn't use a PC in their education, their literacy and
    > numeracy skills were actually better than those who did.
    >
    > The PCs were basically stifling the kids' imagination and distracting
    > them from their homework with games.


    I heard about that survey a while back, and I agree with it
    My kids arent allowed on the comps for homework, only for games (nick.com
    has a _lot_ to answer for). I tried to let them use google for research,
    but it doesnt build a good skillset in them (IMO), and now they _have_ to
    go through the dead tree encyclopedia's, and are expected to have a look
    through the school librarys
    Theres a lot to be said for having to wade through some dead trees to find
    the info you are after (puts hairs on their chests!)

    --
    Hardware, n.: The parts of a computer system that can be kicked

    The best way to get the right answer on usenet is to post the wrong one.
    Shane, May 25, 2005
    #3
  4. In article <j0Qke.2702$>, "PAM." <> wrote:
    >> On Tue, 24 May 2005 21:40:49 +1200, Lawrence D¹Oliveiro wrote:
    >> > The June PC Authority has a brief report on page 13 about a survey into
    >> > the impact of PCs on children's learning. The survey was done for/by the
    >> > UK Royal Economic Society, and covered 100,000 children in 31 countries.
    >> >
    >> > The verdict? Those with a PC at home were worse students. However, those
    >> > from homes with 500 books (not sure why that figure) were better
    >> > students. If they didn't use a PC in their education, their literacy and
    >> > numeracy skills were actually better than those who did.
    >> >
    >> > The PCs were basically stifling the kids' imagination and distracting
    >> > them from their homework with games.

    >
    >Dumbing down or cross skilling? Maybe in 5-50 years we won't have any books
    >printed anymore and we get everything from online.


    It's been a theory for a long time. Remember the paperless office ?
    What actually happened OTOH was a vast increase in printing :)
    No solid papery books ? ... never happen :)

    >We don't need to know how to mend a plow, fire an arrow, even perhaps fix a
    >TV.


    Well I can do one of those :)

    Bruce


    -------------------------------------
    The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it.
    - George Bernard Shaw
    Cynic, n: a blackguard whose faulty vision sees things as they are, not as they ought to be.
    - Ambrose Bierce

    Caution ===== followups may have been changed to relevant groups
    (if there were any)
    Bruce Sinclair, May 25, 2005
    #4
  5. Lawrence D¹Oliveiro

    PAM. Guest

    > On Tue, 24 May 2005 21:40:49 +1200, Lawrence D¹Oliveiro wrote:
    >
    > > The June PC Authority has a brief report on page 13 about a survey into
    > > the impact of PCs on children's learning. The survey was done for/by the
    > > UK Royal Economic Society, and covered 100,000 children in 31 countries.
    > >
    > > The verdict? Those with a PC at home were worse students. However, those
    > > from homes with 500 books (not sure why that figure) were better
    > > students. If they didn't use a PC in their education, their literacy and
    > > numeracy skills were actually better than those who did.
    > >
    > > The PCs were basically stifling the kids' imagination and distracting
    > > them from their homework with games.


    Dumbing down or cross skilling? Maybe in 5-50 years we won't have any books
    printed anymore and we get everything from online.
    We don't need to know how to mend a plow, fire an arrow, even perhaps fix a
    TV. We just go and get a new one or use something else to kill the bloke
    trying to pinch the quad-bike.

    PAM.
    PAM., May 25, 2005
    #5
  6. Lawrence D¹Oliveiro

    PAM. Guest

    "Bruce Sinclair" <> wrote

    > >Dumbing down or cross skilling? Maybe in 5-50 years we won't have any

    books
    > >printed anymore and we get everything from online.

    >
    > It's been a theory for a long time. Remember the paperless office ?
    > What actually happened OTOH was a vast increase in printing :)
    > No solid papery books ? ... never happen :)
    >
    > >We don't need to know how to mend a plow, fire an arrow, even perhaps fix

    a
    > >TV.

    >
    > Well I can do one of those :)


    Likewise.
    I don't think books will go for sometime either but the technology is there
    to remove them if required.
    If DNA manipulation appears on the scene and the bio-techies get good at it,
    there may be no need to sail a boat in the sea as we can all swim accross,
    etc.
    More simply there'll be no need for a specific type of drug because we've
    removed the defect from the human species. The knowledge of the creation of
    said drug gets lost until one day we want it back again.

    PAM.
    PAM., May 25, 2005
    #6
  7. Lawrence D¹Oliveiro

    Graham Guest

    "Lawrence D¹Oliveiro" wrote:
    >
    > The June PC Authority has a brief report on page 13 about a survey into
    > the impact of PCs on children's learning. The survey was done for/by the
    > UK Royal Economic Society, and covered 100,000 children in 31 countries.
    >
    > The verdict? Those with a PC at home were worse students. However, those
    > from homes with 500 books (not sure why that figure) were better
    > students. If they didn't use a PC in their education, their literacy and
    > numeracy skills were actually better than those who did.
    >
    > The PCs were basically stifling the kids' imagination and distracting
    > them from their homework with games.


    The belief of school authorities that they need to have PCs has always
    been misguided. Getting everyone to fundraise to buy a dozen or so
    computers... what a misguided waste of effort. "If we have computers our
    pupils will learn more." BS.
    Graham, May 25, 2005
    #7
  8. In article <>, Lawrence D¹Oliveiro <_zealand> wrote:
    >In article <HpQke.2718$>,
    > z (Bruce Sinclair)
    > wrote:
    >>In article <j0Qke.2702$>, "PAM."
    >><> wrote:
    >>
    >>>Dumbing down or cross skilling? Maybe in 5-50 years we won't have any books
    >>>printed anymore and we get everything from online.

    >>
    >>It's been a theory for a long time. Remember the paperless office ?
    >>What actually happened OTOH was a vast increase in printing :)
    >>No solid papery books ? ... never happen :)

    >
    >What _did_ happen was that, even as paper publishing grew, the total
    >amount of information being transmitted between people grew even faster.
    >I think I saw some estimate that paper now accounts for only a few
    >percent of the total amount of information being exchanged worldwide.


    That I can believe (thank god I guess :) ) .. and yet there are still those
    among us that print things that are sent to us to read them.
    Yes, there is some data to say that it is because print is easier to read
    than screen ... particularly from those that mindlessly accept arial as the
    default font :)




    Bruce


    -------------------------------------
    The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it.
    - George Bernard Shaw
    Cynic, n: a blackguard whose faulty vision sees things as they are, not as they ought to be.
    - Ambrose Bierce

    Caution ===== followups may have been changed to relevant groups
    (if there were any)
    Bruce Sinclair, May 25, 2005
    #8
  9. In article <HpQke.2718$>,
    z (Bruce Sinclair)
    wrote:

    >In article <j0Qke.2702$>, "PAM."
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >>Dumbing down or cross skilling? Maybe in 5-50 years we won't have any books
    >>printed anymore and we get everything from online.

    >
    >It's been a theory for a long time. Remember the paperless office ?
    >What actually happened OTOH was a vast increase in printing :)
    >No solid papery books ? ... never happen :)


    What _did_ happen was that, even as paper publishing grew, the total
    amount of information being transmitted between people grew even faster.
    I think I saw some estimate that paper now accounts for only a few
    percent of the total amount of information being exchanged worldwide.
    Lawrence D¹Oliveiro, May 25, 2005
    #9
  10. Lawrence D¹Oliveiro

    steve Guest

    Lawrence D¹Oliveiro wrote:
    > The June PC Authority has a brief report on page 13 about a survey into
    > the impact of PCs on children's learning. The survey was done for/by the
    > UK Royal Economic Society, and covered 100,000 children in 31 countries.
    >
    > The verdict? Those with a PC at home were worse students. However, those
    > from homes with 500 books (not sure why that figure) were better
    > students. If they didn't use a PC in their education, their literacy and
    > numeracy skills were actually better than those who did.
    >
    > The PCs were basically stifling the kids' imagination and distracting
    > them from their homework with games.


    Unless your kid uses the PC to access the 500 books.

    My youngest daughter spends an hour or two each day just reading books
    on the PC.

    He reading age is 5 years ahead of chronological age and she is at the
    top of her class. She now reads the news, too....and is right up with
    current events....and asking lots of questions.

    It isn't so much the PC....as what you do with it.
    steve, May 25, 2005
    #10
  11. Lawrence D¹Oliveiro

    steve Guest

    Jedmeister wrote:

    > I am amazed the education department are handing out expensive laptops to
    > teachers. In my opinion these are unneeded for the core job of teaching.
    > They will be outdated in several years anyway.


    You've never been a teacher. I haven't either, but I've known a few.

    The lappie lets them take their lesson plans, test papers and otehr
    stuff home with them and work simply and seamlessly on the stuff they
    used to have to sit around the classroom in the evening putting together
    for the next day, week or month.

    It saves teachers time and improves their quality of life and work - if
    used properly, of course.

    It also enhances the teacher's computer skills.....

    It's the sort of investment that just makes sense. Now if we could just
    wean a few of them off the MS Window mono-culture so they are able to
    teach their kids about computing generally instead of computing as
    defined by one vendor.
    steve, May 25, 2005
    #11
  12. In article <42943b71$>, steve <>
    wrote:

    >The lappie lets them take their lesson plans, test papers and otehr
    >stuff home with them and work simply and seamlessly on the stuff they
    >used to have to sit around the classroom in the evening putting together
    >for the next day, week or month.
    >
    >It saves teachers time and improves their quality of life and work - if
    >used properly, of course.
    >
    >It also enhances the teacher's computer skills.....


    Do they learn how to make backups?

    Just one rather vital computer skill...
    Lawrence D¹Oliveiro, May 25, 2005
    #12
  13. In article <Th5le.2874$>, "PAM." <> wrote:
    >"Bruce Sinclair" <> wrote
    >in message
    >> That I can believe (thank god I guess :) ) .. and yet there are still

    >those
    >> among us that print things that are sent to us to read them.
    >> Yes, there is some data to say that it is because print is easier to read
    >> than screen ... particularly from those that mindlessly accept arial as

    >the
    >> default font :)

    >
    >Is there a way to GLOBALLY change the font to one specific throughout ones
    >PC? Through constant formatting I don't want to have to change thefonts
    >again and again
    >
    >Arial-head PAM.


    <smack> Stop it ... it'll make you go blind !

    IIRC, if you are in a windows box, there are some display settings you can
    change to set the defaults.
    Again IIRC, some MS s/w doesn't listen to the settings ... so you might
    have to set defaults in those particularly. :)
    You will get there eventually tho :) :)



    Bruce


    -------------------------------------
    The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it.
    - George Bernard Shaw
    Cynic, n: a blackguard whose faulty vision sees things as they are, not as they ought to be.
    - Ambrose Bierce

    Caution ===== followups may have been changed to relevant groups
    (if there were any)
    Bruce Sinclair, May 25, 2005
    #13
  14. Lawrence D¹Oliveiro

    PAM. Guest

    "Bruce Sinclair" <> wrote
    in message
    > That I can believe (thank god I guess :) ) .. and yet there are still

    those
    > among us that print things that are sent to us to read them.
    > Yes, there is some data to say that it is because print is easier to read
    > than screen ... particularly from those that mindlessly accept arial as

    the
    > default font :)


    Is there a way to GLOBALLY change the font to one specific throughout ones
    PC? Through constant formatting I don't want to have to change thefonts
    again and again

    Arial-head PAM.
    PAM., May 25, 2005
    #14
  15. Lawrence D¹Oliveiro

    PAM. Guest

    "Lawrence D¹Oliveiro" <_zealand> wrote in message

    > Do they learn how to make backups?
    > Just one rather vital computer skill...


    What's a backup?
    :)

    PAM.
    PAM., May 25, 2005
    #15
  16. Lawrence D¹Oliveiro

    Shane Guest

    On Thu, 26 May 2005 08:34:11 +1200, PAM. wrote:

    > "Lawrence D¹Oliveiro" <_zealand> wrote in message
    >
    >> Do they learn how to make backups?
    >> Just one rather vital computer skill...

    >
    > What's a backup?
    > :)
    >
    > PAM.


    IME a backup is someone in the office that _everyone_ blames for cock-ups :)

    --
    Hardware, n.: The parts of a computer system that can be kicked

    The best way to get the right answer on usenet is to post the wrong one.
    Shane, May 25, 2005
    #16
  17. In article <df6le.2900$>, "PAM." <> wrote:
    >"Shane" <-a-geek.net> wrote in message
    >> IME a backup is someone in the office that _everyone_ blames for cock-ups

    >:)
    >
    >I'd always thought of setting up a recruiting agency for top management
    >positions and call it something like Scapegoats 'R' Us.
    >A company feels they're going under or screwing up and require a person to
    >blame. They hire someone from my agency, who works there for 6-12 months
    >before getting the boot, and the blame on the company folding, screwing up.
    >The booted party gets the yearly salary and we split the golden handshake
    >amount.
    >
    >Nice little earner.


    Except it's already happening ... they are called CEOs r us :)
    No ceo hangs around long enough to take responsibility for their decisions
    and anything bad that happens while they are there can be blamed on the
    previous CEO :) :)

    It must be some kind of secret society.





    Bruce


    -------------------------------------
    The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it.
    - George Bernard Shaw
    Cynic, n: a blackguard whose faulty vision sees things as they are, not as they ought to be.
    - Ambrose Bierce

    Caution ===== followups may have been changed to relevant groups
    (if there were any)
    Bruce Sinclair, May 25, 2005
    #17
  18. Lawrence D¹Oliveiro

    PAM. Guest

    "Shane" <-a-geek.net> wrote in message
    > IME a backup is someone in the office that _everyone_ blames for cock-ups

    :)

    I'd always thought of setting up a recruiting agency for top management
    positions and call it something like Scapegoats 'R' Us.
    A company feels they're going under or screwing up and require a person to
    blame. They hire someone from my agency, who works there for 6-12 months
    before getting the boot, and the blame on the company folding, screwing up.
    The booted party gets the yearly salary and we split the golden handshake
    amount.

    Nice little earner.

    PAM.
    PAM., May 25, 2005
    #18
  19. Lawrence D¹Oliveiro

    DaveG Guest

    PAM. wrote:
    > "Lawrence D¹Oliveiro" <_zealand> wrote in message
    >
    >
    >>Do they learn how to make backups?
    >>Just one rather vital computer skill...

    >
    >
    > What's a backup?
    > :)
    >
    > PAM.
    >
    >


    Backup is where everyone wants the server to be as soon as it's gone down.

    d
    DaveG, May 26, 2005
    #19
  20. On Tue, 24 May 2005 23:42:16 +1200, "Jedmeister"
    <> wrote:

    >"Lawrence D¹Oliveiro" <_zealand> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> The June PC Authority has a brief report on page 13 about a survey into
    >> the impact of PCs on children's learning. The survey was done for/by the
    >> UK Royal Economic Society, and covered 100,000 children in 31 countries.
    >>
    >> The verdict? Those with a PC at home were worse students. However, those
    >> from homes with 500 books (not sure why that figure) were better
    >> students. If they didn't use a PC in their education, their literacy and
    >> numeracy skills were actually better than those who did.
    >>
    >> The PCs were basically stifling the kids' imagination and distracting
    >> them from their homework with games.

    >
    >I am amazed the education department are handing out expensive laptops to
    >teachers. In my opinion these are unneeded for the core job of teaching.
    >They will be outdated in several years anyway.


    Im amazed people would write such shite

    A teacher laptop is used for all the many things teachers already use
    ddesktop machines for - except it is a laptop

    Given all the many things we as home user use PCs for and all the many
    things loads of people use them for in their workplace
    Why write such stupid nonsnense
    FreedomChooser, May 26, 2005
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Andy

    Car PCs, mini PCs run Linux and windowsXP

    Andy, Jan 27, 2006, in forum: Computer Information
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    430
  2. Andy
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    573
  3. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Teach your kids to program

    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Jan 28, 2008, in forum: NZ Computing
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    344
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro
    Jan 28, 2008
  4. LOVE Europe HATE the EU

    America 2042: WHITE MINORITY, the country you have left for your kids

    LOVE Europe HATE the EU, Oct 31, 2008, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    144
    Views:
    3,234
  5. richard
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    471
    Mike Yetto
    Sep 23, 2010
Loading...

Share This Page