PC "damage" caused by temperature extremes...???

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by NJ_Annie, Jan 6, 2010.

  1. NJ_Annie

    NJ_Annie Guest

    Up until now, I have basically used my notebook PC indoors in pretty
    much normal temperatures of 65-70 or so.

    I am planning on some hiking trips this year and would love to take my
    notebook with me but I'm concerned about the hot and cold temperature
    extremes that I might encounter.

    Now... I'm not so much concerned about my PC running a little bit
    slower than normal because it's 35 or 90 degrees outside. What I am
    concerned about is actual permanent "damage" that could be done to my
    unit.

    How cold or warm would it have to be to actually "damage" the notebook
    computer to the point it would need repair or even worse case
    scenarios?

    I mean, could you use it outside at like, a ski resort park area @ 20
    degrees or even on the beach @ 95 degrees? Or would these temperature
    extremes really mess-up your PC for good?

    Just wondering guys....

    Thanks

    annie
    NJ_Annie, Jan 6, 2010
    #1
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  2. NJ_Annie

    chuckcar Guest

    On 06 Jan 2010, you wrote in 24hoursupport.helpdesk:

    > Up until now, I have basically used my notebook PC indoors in pretty
    > much normal temperatures of 65-70 or so.
    >
    > I am planning on some hiking trips this year and would love to take my
    > notebook with me but I'm concerned about the hot and cold temperature
    > extremes that I might encounter.
    >
    > Now... I'm not so much concerned about my PC running a little bit
    > slower than normal because it's 35 or 90 degrees outside. What I am
    > concerned about is actual permanent "damage" that could be done to my
    > unit.
    >
    > How cold or warm would it have to be to actually "damage" the notebook
    > computer to the point it would need repair or even worse case
    > scenarios?
    >
    > I mean, could you use it outside at like, a ski resort park area @ 20
    > degrees or even on the beach @ 95 degrees? Or would these temperature
    > extremes really mess-up your PC for good?
    >

    What matters is the CPU temperature. Unless you're planning on being
    somewhere where it's 130F or 40F or outside that range, I wouldn't
    worry about it otherwise. Chips have been built for that range of
    temperatures since the 70's at least.


    BTW this is a newsgroup. I don't do email here. It's also a very good
    way to get tons of junk mail and malware. You'll find that my "email address"
    is non-existant.

    --
    (setq (chuck nil) car(chuck) )
    chuckcar, Jan 6, 2010
    #2
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  3. NJ_Annie

    Whiskers Guest

    On 2010-01-06, NJ_Annie <> wrote:
    > Up until now, I have basically used my notebook PC indoors in pretty
    > much normal temperatures of 65-70 or so.


    [...]

    > I mean, could you use it outside at like, a ski resort park area @ 20
    > degrees or even on the beach @ 95 degrees? Or would these temperature
    > extremes really mess-up your PC for good?
    >
    > Just wondering guys....
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > annie


    This is about digital cameras, but the same general points apply to
    laptops - except that laptops are more fragile than most cameras
    <http://www.pcworld.com/article/153446/winterizing_your_camera.html>.

    Batteries do not like cold, and you should take great care to wrap your
    kit in dry waterproof coverings before going from cold/outdoors to
    warm/indoors and then let the wrapped kit warm up to room temperature
    before unwrapping it, otherwise you'll get condensation (= water) in all
    the internal spaces, possibly wrecking the electronics.

    Tropical conditions are often humid, if not actually wet, and that can
    have a bad effect on electronics too. Then there are all the creepy
    crawlies that might take a fancy to chewing on or making house in your
    equipment.

    Hot dry deserts mean dust, which is not good for machines of any sort.

    If you're travelling, you also need to consider the vibration and shock to
    which your baggage will be subject.

    The computer's instruction book (or PDF file on CD) should include details
    of the temperature and humidity ranges the machine is designed to
    withstand while powered down, and to actually operate in. The makers may
    be able to give advice or help to extend those ranges.

    If you plan to visit foreign countries, check in advance what the rules
    are for taking valuables in general, and computer hardware and software in
    particular, across the borders - in both directions. Also remember that
    power and telephone sockets can vary, as can power voltages and
    frequencies.

    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~
    Whiskers, Jan 6, 2010
    #3
  4. NJ_Annie

    NJ_Annie Guest

    Thanks for the replies. The thing that concernes me more than
    anything is the part about the "vibration" and all. One of the things
    I liked about getting a laptop is the portability of the unit.

    Are you saying it wouldn't be a wise idea to carry it with me in my
    backpack? I don't throw my backpack around although I do move it
    around quite a bit.

    Are these units more sensitive than, let's say a cell phone or a
    radio? Aren't the components soldered into place?

    Just wondering .... : - )

    annie
    NJ_Annie, Jan 7, 2010
    #4
  5. NJ_Annie

    Clot Guest

    NJ_Annie wrote:
    > Thanks for the replies. The thing that concernes me more than
    > anything is the part about the "vibration" and all. One of the things
    > I liked about getting a laptop is the portability of the unit.
    >
    > Are you saying it wouldn't be a wise idea to carry it with me in my
    > backpack? I don't throw my backpack around although I do move it
    > around quite a bit.
    >
    > Are these units more sensitive than, let's say a cell phone or a
    > radio? Aren't the components soldered into place?
    >
    > Just wondering .... : - )


    It's not been a problem for me since the late 80's. I've had my various
    laptops in the boot of the car during periods of cold dry and wet, hot, wet
    and humid without remiss, ( probably 500,000 miles) . I've taken laptops at
    various times to many countries over most of the Northern Hemisphere, either
    in the hold or in the passenger compartment without remiss.

    I did manage to fatally disassemble one laptop whilst trying to open the
    office front door and whilst also holding the laptop in its case in the same
    hand,(it did not bounce).

    Worth thinking about where you bury your laptop in your rucksack!
    Clot, Jan 7, 2010
    #5
  6. NJ_Annie

    chuckcar Guest

    NJ_Annie <> wrote in
    news::

    > Thanks for the replies. The thing that concernes me more than
    > anything is the part about the "vibration" and all. One of the things
    > I liked about getting a laptop is the portability of the unit.
    >
    > Are you saying it wouldn't be a wise idea to carry it with me in my
    > backpack? I don't throw my backpack around although I do move it
    > around quite a bit.
    >

    If you're going to do that with it, do *not* drop the backpack and
    *always* shut the computer off before you do so. *not* standby, but
    completely off.

    > Are these units more sensitive than, let's say a cell phone or a
    > radio? Aren't the components soldered into place?
    >


    Hard drives spin, g-forces kill spinning hard drives. 10s of g forces
    kill anything electronic in a plastic case.

    --
    (setq (chuck nil) car(chuck) )
    chuckcar, Jan 7, 2010
    #6
  7. NJ_Annie

    rf Guest

    "chuckcar" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns9CF8E3DED9CCFchuck@127.0.0.1...
    > NJ_Annie <> wrote in
    > news::
    >
    >> Thanks for the replies. The thing that concernes me more than
    >> anything is the part about the "vibration" and all. One of the things
    >> I liked about getting a laptop is the portability of the unit.
    >>
    >> Are you saying it wouldn't be a wise idea to carry it with me in my
    >> backpack? I don't throw my backpack around although I do move it
    >> around quite a bit.
    >>

    > If you're going to do that with it, do *not* drop the backpack and
    > *always* shut the computer off before you do so. *not* standby, but
    > completely off.


    What do you think "standby" means chuckup? Yes, the computer goes to sleep.

    Do you ever hear disks spinning when a computer is in standby mode? Do you
    see anything on the screen? No, you don't. The computer only wakes up when
    its lid is opened.

    Out of your arse again chuckup.
    rf, Jan 7, 2010
    #7
  8. NJ_Annie

    Whiskers Guest

    On 2010-01-07, NJ_Annie <> wrote:
    > Thanks for the replies. The thing that concernes me more than
    > anything is the part about the "vibration" and all. One of the things
    > I liked about getting a laptop is the portability of the unit.
    >
    > Are you saying it wouldn't be a wise idea to carry it with me in my
    > backpack? I don't throw my backpack around although I do move it
    > around quite a bit.
    >
    > Are these units more sensitive than, let's say a cell phone or a
    > radio? Aren't the components soldered into place?
    >
    > Just wondering .... : - )
    >
    > annie


    As long as the machine is powered down, normal walking and careful
    handling of the backpack should be fine. Just don't fall onto the
    backpack or sit on it. The biggest danger is breaking the screen, I think
    - so I wouldn't let baggage handlers get hold of it unless it's inside a
    good hard case.

    Not all the connections are soldered. There are likely to be plug and
    socket connections for the disk drives, keyboard, and some other bits, and
    RAM cards and possibly network cards and modem will be a push fit. Other
    parts will be screwed down, or held in clips, or glued.

    Small-screen low-power 'netbooks' with no hard disks may be more rugged
    than conventional laptops. Some makers offer special 'rugged' models that
    are designed to take more abuse than normal versions.

    But if you're back-packing, weight is a consideration; do you really need
    to carry a laptop or even a netbook, if all you want it for is email?
    There may be a 'smartphone' or 'PDA' that will do all you want and be far
    more portable. They also tend to have more than an hour or so's use
    between battery-charges - some can even work with disposable batteries.

    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~
    Whiskers, Jan 7, 2010
    #8
  9. NJ_Annie

    §nühw¤£f Guest

    NJ_Annie wrote:
    > Thanks for the replies. The thing that concernes me more than
    > anything is the part about the "vibration" and all. One of the things
    > I liked about getting a laptop is the portability of the unit.
    >
    > Are you saying it wouldn't be a wise idea to carry it with me in my
    > backpack? I don't throw my backpack around although I do move it
    > around quite a bit.
    >
    > Are these units more sensitive than, let's say a cell phone or a
    > radio? Aren't the components soldered into place?
    >
    > Just wondering .... : - )
    >
    > annie


    Get a cheapo netbook witha solid state drive and then get a screen
    protector for it or the screen will look like hell after a few miles
    bouncing around in vehicles.

    HTH

    --
    http://www.democracyforamerica.com/
    cageprisoners.com|www.snuhwolf.9f.com|www.eyeonpalin.org
    _____ ____ ____ __ /\_/\ __ _ ______ _____
    / __/ |/ / / / / // // . . \\ \ |\ | / __ \ \ \ __\
    _\ \/ / /_/ / _ / \ / \ \| \| \ \_\ \ \__\ _\
    /___/_/|_/\____/_//_/ \_@_/ \__|\__|\____/\____\_\
    §nühw¤£f, Jan 7, 2010
    #9
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