password security

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by chrismcclain077@hotmail.com, Feb 13, 2008.

  1. Guest

    I'm a sucker for privacy. I want some additional security for some
    word documents. Anyone know of some good software to put a password
    on a word doc?
     
    , Feb 13, 2008
    #1
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  2. Guest

    , Feb 13, 2008
    #2
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  3. Rôgêr Guest

    wrote:
    > wrote:
    >
    >> I'm a sucker for privacy. I want some additional security for some
    >> word documents. Anyone know of some good software to put a password
    >> on a word doc?

    >
    > Zip the doc with a password, or there is truecrypt
    > http://www.truecrypt.org/downloads.php
    > encrypt the entire drive, or PGP http://gnupg.org/


    With Truecrypt you CAN encrypt the entire drive, but you can create
    virtual disks of almost any size to store encrypted docs in.
     
    Rôgêr, Feb 13, 2008
    #3
  4. Guest

    Rôgêr <> wrote:

    > wrote:
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I'm a sucker for privacy. I want some additional security for some
    >>> word documents. Anyone know of some good software to put a password
    >>> on a word doc?


    >> Zip the doc with a password, or there is truecrypt
    >> http://www.truecrypt.org/downloads.php
    >> encrypt the entire drive, or PGP http://gnupg.org/


    >With Truecrypt you CAN encrypt the entire drive, but you can create
    >virtual disks of almost any size to store encrypted docs in.


    I mentioned Truecrypt because the new version was released yesterday.

    With the world today where you can be taken to court and thrown in
    jail if you don't or won't reveal your key.

    If Truecrypt would delete the drive (0 it out, or corrupt it
    encrypted) on a keyword, I would go that route.

    "AccessData Forensic Toolkit" wouldn't show anything, and nobody's
    going to pull much if any useful data.

    Ahh the things I go thru to make sure nobody plays the games I have
    installed on my computer :]
    --

    1K project
    http://www.gametrailers.com/player/usermovies/12321.html?id=12321
     
    , Feb 13, 2008
    #4
  5. Rôgêr Guest

    wrote:
    > Rôgêr <> wrote:
    >
    >> wrote:
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> I'm a sucker for privacy. I want some additional security for some
    >>>> word documents. Anyone know of some good software to put a password
    >>>> on a word doc?

    >
    >>> Zip the doc with a password, or there is truecrypt
    >>> http://www.truecrypt.org/downloads.php
    >>> encrypt the entire drive, or PGP http://gnupg.org/

    >
    >> With Truecrypt you CAN encrypt the entire drive, but you can create
    >> virtual disks of almost any size to store encrypted docs in.

    >
    > I mentioned Truecrypt because the new version was released yesterday.
    >
    > With the world today where you can be taken to court and thrown in
    > jail if you don't or won't reveal your key.
    >
    > If Truecrypt would delete the drive (0 it out, or corrupt it
    > encrypted) on a keyword, I would go that route.


    Now you're getting me worried. I guess a batch file seems to be looming
    in my future.
     
    Rôgêr, Feb 13, 2008
    #5
  6. G. Morgan Guest

    wrote:

    >With the world today where you can be taken to court and thrown in
    >jail if you don't or won't reveal your key.


    Not in the US <yet>

    December 24, 2007
    PGP and the 5th Amendment

    A Vermont federal judge has ruled that a person cannot be compelled by police
    to divulge his PGP key. This is by no means the end of the legal debate (Orin
    Kerr comments), but it's certainly good news.
    http://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2007/12/pgp_and_the_5th.html
    --

    I kill all Google Group posts, you can too.
    Take back Usenet <--> http://improve-usenet.org
     
    G. Morgan, Feb 13, 2008
    #6
  7. Guest

    G. Morgan <> wrote:

    > wrote:
    >
    >>With the world today where you can be taken to court and thrown in
    >>jail if you don't or won't reveal your key.

    >
    >Not in the US <yet>
    >
    >December 24, 2007
    >PGP and the 5th Amendment
    >
    >A Vermont federal judge has ruled that a person cannot be compelled by police
    >to divulge his PGP key. This is by no means the end of the legal debate (Orin
    >Kerr comments), but it's certainly good news.
    >http://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2007/12/pgp_and_the_5th.html



    Good news so far, but "The UK government can now demand that citizens
    hand over their data encryption keys - or face jailtime for
    obstructing justice. The law only applies to data on UK shores, and
    doesn't cover information transmitted via UK servers across the
    internet. " http://yro.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=07/10/02/1237215

    Old enough to remember Philip Zimmermann against the U.S.?
    PGP was considered a weapon and they (the U.S.) screwed with him for
    years and years http://www.philzimmermann.com/EN/background/index.html

    I respect him very much for what he did.
    --

    http://www.albinoblacksheep.com/flash/bunny
     
    , Feb 13, 2008
    #7
  8. catchme Guest

    G. Morgan wrote:
    > wrote:
    >
    >> With the world today where you can be taken to court and thrown in
    >> jail if you don't or won't reveal your key.

    >
    > Not in the US <yet>
    >
    > December 24, 2007
    > PGP and the 5th Amendment
    >
    > A Vermont federal judge has ruled that a person cannot be compelled by police
    > to divulge his PGP key. This is by no means the end of the legal debate (Orin
    > Kerr comments), but it's certainly good news.
    > http://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2007/12/pgp_and_the_5th.html


    in a criminal case i think all that is necesary is that they obtain a
    warrant for the computer and then attempt to decrypt it themselves,
    thereby bypassing the suspect incriminating oneself.
    A police officer seldom asks a suspect for the keys to a home or car
    when serving a warrant, so why be polite concerning a computer?
     
    catchme, Feb 13, 2008
    #8
  9. wrote in news:t5s4r3puie8uk12l1h121vhkufeegdiuto@
    4ax.com:

    > Rôgêr <> wrote:
    >
    >> wrote:
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> I'm a sucker for privacy. I want some additional security for some
    >>>> word documents. Anyone know of some good software to put a password
    >>>> on a word doc?

    >
    >>> Zip the doc with a password, or there is truecrypt
    >>> http://www.truecrypt.org/downloads.php
    >>> encrypt the entire drive, or PGP http://gnupg.org/

    >
    >>With Truecrypt you CAN encrypt the entire drive, but you can create
    >>virtual disks of almost any size to store encrypted docs in.

    >
    > I mentioned Truecrypt because the new version was released yesterday.
    >
    > With the world today where you can be taken to court and thrown in
    > jail if you don't or won't reveal your key.



    Listen to me now and hear me later:

    If you do not recall you cannot be prosecuted. You might be
    harrassed, but you *cannot* be prosecuted for what you do not
    recall. This is why USAG Albutthead Gonzalez, and almost any
    lawyer or politician will go "I do not recall" and hold that
    position without any fear of prosecution. Ridicule and perhaps
    a little dégringolade of credibility, but all that might be
    overcome... ehh? I can not recall who told me that, but
    it works very efficiently and omnibus.

    Until they start pulling your fingernails out with pliers
    and nailing your nutsack to wooden chairs - then you lie,
    but you can cite the wounds as duress and unless you give
    up the info, you're home safe. Make sure you've got a
    bonus clause in your contract before you let it go that
    far however.

    Word.

    --

    My name is Bucky Breeder and I approve this message!

    Who says crime does not pay?

    http://preview.tinyurl.com/27dn86
     
    Bucky Breeder, Feb 13, 2008
    #9
  10. Another Guest

    wrote:
    > I'm a sucker for privacy. I want some additional security for some
    > word documents. Anyone know of some good software to put a password
    > on a word doc?


    Why stop with your word docs?

    www.truecrypt.org
     
    Another, Feb 13, 2008
    #10
  11. richard Guest

    On Tue, 12 Feb 2008 18:01:06 -0800 (PST),
    wrote:

    >I'm a sucker for privacy. I want some additional security for some
    >word documents. Anyone know of some good software to put a password
    >on a word doc?


    As I have found out from experience, most of the 3rd party password
    programs can easily be thwarted.
    They only work when the password program is running.
    What most of them do is simply create a file that only that program
    can read, and link it to the protected file. Upon opening that file,
    you get asked for the password.
    Knowing that, all I have to do is to copy your protected file onto
    another machine and read your unprotected file.

    What you really need to do is, password protect the folder. Not the
    file.
    If I can't get into the folder, I can't get to your file.

    But if I simply shut off your computer, reboot, your program isn't
    running so now I can get into your folder and file.
     
    richard, Feb 13, 2008
    #11
  12. John Holmes Guest

    "contributed" in 24hoursupport.helpdesk:

    > I'm a sucker for privacy. I want some additional security for some
    > word documents. Anyone know of some good software to put a password
    > on a word doc?


    Ignore the previous responds, though those guys meant to help you. It is
    NOT possible to fully protect your documents. The only secure way is:
    save your documents on a USB stick, then destroy your harddisk (I really
    mean destroy it with some metal shredder) You can then use the USB stick
    in any other computer to read the files, but you'll need to destroy the
    HD of that computer (I really mean destroy it with some metal shredder)
    afterwards to make sure no data is left. Bottom line is that all data on
    every harddisk can be recovered. Impossible when the harddisk has been
    crushed in 100000 pieces.

    Now you just have to be sure nobody has access to your USB stick.

    --
    Your mother was a rebellious cafeteria lady who ran a bogus university in
    shopping centres.
     
    John Holmes, Feb 13, 2008
    #12
  13. zaax Guest

    wrote:

    > Truecrypt


    I like the bit about Plausible Deniability If US presidents can do it
    so can I.

    --
    ---
    zaax
     
    zaax, Feb 13, 2008
    #13
  14. G. Morgan Guest

    wrote:

    > G. Morgan <> wrote:
    >
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>With the world today where you can be taken to court and thrown in
    >>>jail if you don't or won't reveal your key.

    >>
    >>Not in the US <yet>
    >>
    >>December 24, 2007
    >>PGP and the 5th Amendment
    >>
    >>A Vermont federal judge has ruled that a person cannot be compelled by police
    >>to divulge his PGP key. This is by no means the end of the legal debate (Orin
    >>Kerr comments), but it's certainly good news.
    >>http://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2007/12/pgp_and_the_5th.html

    >
    >
    >Good news so far, but "The UK government can now demand that citizens
    >hand over their data encryption keys - or face jailtime for
    >obstructing justice. The law only applies to data on UK shores, and
    >doesn't cover information transmitted via UK servers across the
    >internet. " http://yro.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=07/10/02/1237215


    Does the UK have an equivalent to the US 5th Constitutional Amendment?

    For those who do not know what the 5th Amendment is:
    [No person...shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against
    himself...]


    >Old enough to remember Philip Zimmermann against the U.S.?
    >PGP was considered a weapon and they (the U.S.) screwed with him for
    >years and years http://www.philzimmermann.com/EN/background/index.html
    >
    >I respect him very much for what he did.


    I am old enough, and I do remember. I recall he published a hardcover book
    with the source code to PGP that was protected under law, something about books
    can't be weapons.

    --

    I kill all Google Group posts, you can too.
    Take back Usenet <--> http://improve-usenet.org
     
    G. Morgan, Feb 14, 2008
    #14
  15. G. Morgan Guest

    catchme wrote:

    >G. Morgan wrote:
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> With the world today where you can be taken to court and thrown in
    >>> jail if you don't or won't reveal your key.

    >>
    >> Not in the US <yet>
    >>
    >> December 24, 2007
    >> PGP and the 5th Amendment
    >>
    >> A Vermont federal judge has ruled that a person cannot be compelled by police
    >> to divulge his PGP key. This is by no means the end of the legal debate (Orin
    >> Kerr comments), but it's certainly good news.
    >> http://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2007/12/pgp_and_the_5th.html

    >
    >in a criminal case i think all that is necesary is that they obtain a
    >warrant for the computer and then attempt to decrypt it themselves,
    >thereby bypassing the suspect incriminating oneself.
    >A police officer seldom asks a suspect for the keys to a home or car
    >when serving a warrant, so why be polite concerning a computer?


    That would be fine if the encryption is breakable, but in the case of PGP it is
    widely believed that law enforcement does not poses technology to break it.
    What the FBI and other enforcement agencies have done is installed key loggers,
    and surveillance of the keyboard to get the pass phrase.

    --

    I kill all Google Group posts, you can too.
    Take back Usenet <--> http://improve-usenet.org
     
    G. Morgan, Feb 14, 2008
    #15
  16. Guest

    G. Morgan <> wrote:

    > wrote:
    >
    >> G. Morgan <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>With the world today where you can be taken to court and thrown in
    >>>>jail if you don't or won't reveal your key.
    >>>
    >>>Not in the US <yet>
    >>>
    >>>December 24, 2007
    >>>PGP and the 5th Amendment
    >>>
    >>>A Vermont federal judge has ruled that a person cannot be compelled by police
    >>>to divulge his PGP key. This is by no means the end of the legal debate (Orin
    >>>Kerr comments), but it's certainly good news.
    >>>http://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2007/12/pgp_and_the_5th.html


    >>Good news so far, but "The UK government can now demand that citizens
    >>hand over their data encryption keys - or face jailtime for
    >>obstructing justice. The law only applies to data on UK shores, and
    >>doesn't cover information transmitted via UK servers across the
    >>internet. " http://yro.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=07/10/02/1237215

    >
    >Does the UK have an equivalent to the US 5th Constitutional Amendment?
    >
    >For those who do not know what the 5th Amendment is:
    >[No person...shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against
    >himself...]


    We lost the 4th today (telcom), one to watch is "US Courts Consider
    Legality of Laptop Inspection"
    http://yro.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=08/01/08/1641209
    Problem with this one is that the kid said he had child pornography on
    the laptop before it was searched...

    >>Old enough to remember Philip Zimmermann against the U.S.?
    >>PGP was considered a weapon and they (the U.S.) screwed with him for
    >>years and years http://www.philzimmermann.com/EN/background/index.html
    >>
    >>I respect him very much for what he did.

    >
    >I am old enough, and I do remember. I recall he published a hardcover book
    >with the source code to PGP that was protected under law, something about books
    >can't be weapons.


    Never read the book, did download PGP from MIT.EDU saying that I was a
    us citizen and would not export it :) this when he was having all his
    problems. I still have version 2.6.2 (dos) that I use.
    --

    Dimwits
    http://my.break.com/content/view.aspx?ContentID=451653
     
    , Feb 14, 2008
    #16
  17. catchme Guest

    G. Morgan wrote:
    > catchme wrote:
    >
    >> G. Morgan wrote:
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> With the world today where you can be taken to court and thrown in
    >>>> jail if you don't or won't reveal your key.
    >>> Not in the US <yet>
    >>>
    >>> December 24, 2007
    >>> PGP and the 5th Amendment
    >>>
    >>> A Vermont federal judge has ruled that a person cannot be compelled by police
    >>> to divulge his PGP key. This is by no means the end of the legal debate (Orin
    >>> Kerr comments), but it's certainly good news.
    >>> http://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2007/12/pgp_and_the_5th.html

    >> in a criminal case i think all that is necesary is that they obtain a
    >> warrant for the computer and then attempt to decrypt it themselves,
    >> thereby bypassing the suspect incriminating oneself.
    >> A police officer seldom asks a suspect for the keys to a home or car
    >> when serving a warrant, so why be polite concerning a computer?

    >
    > That would be fine if the encryption is breakable, but in the case of PGP it is
    > widely believed that law enforcement does not poses technology to break it.
    > What the FBI and other enforcement agencies have done is installed key loggers,
    > and surveillance of the keyboard to get the pass phrase.
    >

    i believe that the bit length of a pgp key is not in excess of what the
    nsa is capable of.
    the only concievable way to get around it is to install something that
    explodes the computer after 3 unsuccesful tries ("call me Bond...")
     
    catchme, Feb 14, 2008
    #17
  18. Guest

    catchme <> wrote:

    >i believe that the bit length of a pgp key is not in excess of what the
    >nsa is capable of.
    >the only concievable way to get around it is to install something that
    >explodes the computer after 3 unsuccesful tries ("call me Bond...")


    In the Armed service, on top of each safe or anything of importance a
    Thermite grenade sits; to burn it up if it's about to be compromised
    (over run).
    http://how2dostuff.blogspot.com/2006/01/how-to-make-thermite.html


    --

    Dimwits
    http://my.break.com/content/view.aspx?ContentID=451653
     
    , Feb 14, 2008
    #18
  19. Aardvark Guest

    On Thu, 14 Feb 2008 04:06:59 +0000, G. Morgan wrote:

    > Does the UK have an equivalent to the US 5th Constitutional Amendment?
    >
    > For those who do not know what the 5th Amendment is: [No person...shall
    > be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself...]


    For one thing, the UK does not now, nor ever has had, a written
    constitution.

    For another, a jury will be directed by a judge to infer guilt if a
    defendant refuses to fully answer any questions from counsel during a
    trial.

    If you try to 'take the fifth' on this side of the pond, you'll be off to
    jail in no time at all :)

    --
    Liverpool. European City Of Culture 2008
    http://www.liverpool08.com
     
    Aardvark, Feb 14, 2008
    #19
  20. Alang Guest

    G. Morgan wrote:

    > wrote:
    >
    > > G. Morgan <> wrote:
    > >
    > > > wrote:
    > > >
    > > > > With the world today where you can be taken to court and
    > > > > thrown in jail if you don't or won't reveal your key.
    > > >
    > > > Not in the US <yet>
    > > >
    > > > December 24, 2007
    > > > PGP and the 5th Amendment
    > > >
    > > > A Vermont federal judge has ruled that a person cannot be
    > > > compelled by police to divulge his PGP key. This is by no means
    > > > the end of the legal debate (Orin Kerr comments), but it's
    > > > certainly good news.
    > > > http://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2007/12/pgp_and_the_5th.ht
    > > > ml

    > >
    > >
    > > Good news so far, but "The UK government can now demand that
    > > citizens hand over their data encryption keys - or face jailtime
    > > for obstructing justice. The law only applies to data on UK
    > > shores, and doesn't cover information transmitted via UK servers
    > > across the internet. "
    > > http://yro.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=07/10/02/1237215

    >
    > Does the UK have an equivalent to the US 5th Constitutional
    > Amendment?


    Not anymore.
    The law that broke it was a law on speeding. The owner of any vehicle
    caught speeding by a speed camera is required by law to name the
    driver even if that driver is him/herself. Failure to do so gets an
    automatic fine and penalty points on the licence of the owner
    >
    > For those who do not know what the 5th Amendment is:
    > [No person...shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a
    > witness against himself...]
    >
    >
    > > Old enough to remember Philip Zimmermann against the U.S.?
    > > PGP was considered a weapon and they (the U.S.) screwed with him
    > > for years and years
    > > http://www.philzimmermann.com/EN/background/index.html
    > >
    > > I respect him very much for what he did.

    >
    > I am old enough, and I do remember. I recall he published a
    > hardcover book with the source code to PGP that was protected under
    > law, something about books can't be weapons.




    --
     
    Alang, Feb 14, 2008
    #20
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