passive boosters, 802.11 g v. n

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Judges1318, Nov 7, 2008.

  1. Judges1318

    Judges1318 Guest

    Would anyone care to comment/recommend on a wireless home router
    for one laptop computer.

    The configuration is:

    The children's room is under the garage, with a concrete ceiling
    (the garage floor) above it.

    The room has an ADSL (telescum), and a children's desktop.

    The lounge/kitchen is above the garage, and there
    is a brand new laptop in it, with a 802.11n device.

    The intention is to put a 802.11 router next to the
    ADSL modem, in order to have a wireless connection
    for the laptop.

    There are no other computers to be linked.

    Mrs. does not want any wires anywhere in the lounge, so rewiring
    is out of question.

    - Will 'n' wireless work through a concrete slab.

    - Will 'g' work through a concrete slab?

    - If both will work, would the 'n' work any better than the 'g'?

    - BTW, what are good 'g' and 'n' routers, in your experience/opinion?

    - Is 'g' fast enough for all practical purposes, according
    to your experience/opinion (streaming audio, youtube rubbish and alike)?

    - Is there a passive 'booster' i.e. a directional antenna
    that can be added to a wireless router?

    - Will it help to get the signal through the concrete slab?

    Some time ago someone was using a wok net as a parabolic reflector,
    but I have forgotten where I saw it.

    All comments/hints welcome.

    Cheers!
    Judges1318, Nov 7, 2008
    #1
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  2. Judges1318

    EMB Guest

    Judges1318 wrote:
    >
    > - Will 'n' wireless work through a concrete slab.


    Maybe
    >
    > - Will 'g' work through a concrete slab?


    Also maybe

    > - If both will work, would the 'n' work any better than the 'g'?


    Almost certainly

    >
    > - BTW, what are good 'g' and 'n' routers, in your experience/opinion?


    Linksys
    >
    > - Is 'g' fast enough for all practical purposes, according
    > to your experience/opinion (streaming audio, youtube rubbish and alike)?


    802.11g will give you a real world throughput of close to 20Mb/s with a
    decent signal. Is your broadband faster than that?
    >
    > - Is there a passive 'booster' i.e. a directional antenna
    > that can be added to a wireless router?


    Yes
    >
    > - Will it help to get the signal through the concrete slab?
    >

    maybe - it'll depend a lot on the thickness of the slab and how much
    steel is in it.

    > Some time ago someone was using a wok net as a parabolic reflector,
    > but I have forgotten where I saw it.


    http://www.usbwifi.orconhosting.net.nz/
    EMB, Nov 7, 2008
    #2
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  3. Judges1318

    Judges1318 Guest

    EMB wrote:
    > Judges1318 wrote:
    >>
    >> - Will 'n' wireless work through a concrete slab.

    >
    > Maybe
    >>
    >> - Will 'g' work through a concrete slab?

    >
    > Also maybe
    >
    >> - If both will work, would the 'n' work any better than the 'g'?

    >
    > Almost certainly
    >
    >>
    >> - BTW, what are good 'g' and 'n' routers, in your experience/opinion?

    >
    > Linksys
    >>
    >> - Is 'g' fast enough for all practical purposes, according
    >> to your experience/opinion (streaming audio, youtube rubbish and alike)?

    >
    > 802.11g will give you a real world throughput of close to 20Mb/s with a
    > decent signal. Is your broadband faster than that?
    >>
    >> - Is there a passive 'booster' i.e. a directional antenna
    >> that can be added to a wireless router?

    >
    > Yes
    >>
    >> - Will it help to get the signal through the concrete slab?
    >>

    > maybe - it'll depend a lot on the thickness of the slab and how much
    > steel is in it.
    >
    >> Some time ago someone was using a wok net as a parabolic reflector,
    >> but I have forgotten where I saw it.

    >
    > http://www.usbwifi.orconhosting.net.nz/





    That helped! Thanks a lot!
    Judges1318, Nov 7, 2008
    #3
  4. Judges1318

    Craig Sutton Guest

    "Judges1318" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > Would anyone care to comment/recommend on a wireless home router
    > for one laptop computer.
    >
    > The configuration is:
    >
    > The children's room is under the garage, with a concrete ceiling
    > (the garage floor) above it.
    >
    > The room has an ADSL (telescum), and a children's desktop.
    >
    > The lounge/kitchen is above the garage, and there
    > is a brand new laptop in it, with a 802.11n device.
    >
    > The intention is to put a 802.11 router next to the
    > ADSL modem, in order to have a wireless connection
    > for the laptop.
    >
    > There are no other computers to be linked.
    >
    > Mrs. does not want any wires anywhere in the lounge, so rewiring
    > is out of question.
    >


    Reality is try it out and see. Look for one with multiple antennas, either
    internal or replaceable external ones which can be swapped for ones with
    higher gain.

    I'm using a WL 600 G all in one
    Craig Sutton, Nov 7, 2008
    #4
  5. Judges1318

    Judges1318 Guest

    grum wrote:

    > http://www.dynalink.co.nz/cms/index.php?page=np290w-wireless-homeplug


    Hm, interesting! I have not known they were making these! Thanks!

    > oh, and re "no other computers to be linked" - just you wait - plan for
    > it now I'd say. Sooner or later there will be an iPod touch, or a media
    > streamer, or a kids laptop, needing to join the LAN.
    >


    I know. But forward looking has become a luxury.
    Otherwise, I would have proposed recabling of the whole house,
    and resolve all household networking issues "forever";-).
    Judges1318, Nov 9, 2008
    #5
  6. Judges1318

    Richard Guest

    Mark Robinson wrote:

    > Parabolic reflectors and other directional antennae narrow the signal
    > into a beam. This improves coverage in the path of the beam and dimishes
    > it everywhere else. Such systems do not give general coverage.
    >
    > There will be no significant advantages in using 'n' over 'g'. Neither
    > will go through the slab well.
    >
    > A 'g' router will be faster than your internet connection. If you move
    > lots of data around within your network 'n' will give you some advantage
    > beyond future proofing.


    I would disagree with that. G only gives a 54meg rate when in the same
    room, which delivers about 18-20. When you have a wall in the way the
    speed still shows the link at 54 or 36, but the thruput will plummet to
    5-10 on a good day.

    Multiple antennas, and gear that supports mimo helps a hell of a lot in
    non line of sight conditions, N has that so is a great step up from G
    for stability of the connection IME, and the speed will become a non
    issue thruout most of a normal small NZ house.

    I would get a N accesspoint and try it in various locations downstairs
    to see how it goes upstairs. Dont get an all in one router since that
    makes moving things around a pain.
    Richard, Nov 10, 2008
    #6
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