Panasonic FZ-20 low light settings

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Lew, Mar 1, 2007.

  1. Lew

    Lew Guest

    What is the best way to set up the FZ-20 to get pics of kids in low
    light? This situation requires large lens openings, and yet
    reasonably fast shutter speeds because the little brats won't sit
    still. How should I set up these things to optimize the camera:
    -- white balance (does it have any effect?)
    -- ISO - 80,100,200,400 (I assume 400 is best for low light)
    -- picture size (2560, 2048, 1600, etc.) (What effect does this have
    in low light?)
    -- quality (tiff, hi cmprsn, lo cmprsn)(What effect does this have in
    low light?)
    -- color effect (cool, warm)(What effect does this have in low light?)
    -- picture adjustment (contrast, sharpness, saturation, noise
    reduction)(What effect does this have in low light?)
    -- image stabilization (off, mode 1, mode 2)(What effect does this
    have in low light?)

    Thanks for any info.

    Lew
     
    Lew, Mar 1, 2007
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Lew

    Diamond Dave Guest

    On 1 Mar 2007 07:12:08 -0800, "Lew" <> wrote:

    >What is the best way to set up the FZ-20 to get pics of kids in low
    >light? This situation requires large lens openings, and yet
    >reasonably fast shutter speeds because the little brats won't sit
    >still. How should I set up these things to optimize the camera:


    Tranquilizer darts or use a strobe.
     
    Diamond Dave, Mar 1, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Lew

    Paul Allen Guest

    On 1 Mar 2007 07:12:08 -0800
    "Lew" <> wrote:

    > What is the best way to set up the FZ-20 to get pics of kids in low
    > light? This situation requires large lens openings, and yet
    > reasonably fast shutter speeds because the little brats won't sit
    > still. How should I set up these things to optimize the camera:
    > -- white balance (does it have any effect?)


    No effect on the low light problem, but you want it set correctly for
    the light source.

    > -- ISO - 80,100,200,400 (I assume 400 is best for low light)


    Noise will be awful, but 400 will give you the best chance of stopping
    action without using the flash.

    > -- picture size (2560, 2048, 1600, etc.) (What effect does this have
    > in low light?)
    > -- quality (tiff, hi cmprsn, lo cmprsn)(What effect does this have in
    > low light?)
    > -- color effect (cool, warm)(What effect does this have in low light?)
    > -- picture adjustment (contrast, sharpness, saturation, noise
    > reduction)(What effect does this have in low light?)


    Each of these has a purpose unrelated to low light.

    > -- image stabilization (off, mode 1, mode 2)(What effect does this
    > have in low light?)


    You want stabilization on. I find that my FZ30 works best in the mode
    where the stabilizer only activates during exposure. If I recall,
    that's mode 2.

    > Thanks for any info.


    You're basically toast. Suck it up and use the flash. Or, if it really
    matters, you're rolling in money, and you don't mind lugging more gear,
    go buy a DSLR. Sorry.

    Paul Allen
     
    Paul Allen, Mar 1, 2007
    #3
  4. Lew

    Lew Guest

    Alrighty. I have begun lately to consider a DSLR. I want so badly to
    get really photography of my grandaughters in low light situations
    (with no flash) that I am trying to come up with a way to overcome the
    marital difficulties such a purchase will almost certainly eventuate.

    Any recommendations for the new crop of DLSRs in the $800 to $1,200
    range? I'd like to use SD cards for memory, but the main criteria is
    to get crisp pics in average indoor lighting situations.

    lew

    On Mar 1, 1:13 pm, Paul Allen <> wrote:
    > On 1 Mar 2007 07:12:08 -0800
    >
    > "Lew" <> wrote:
    > > What is the best way to set up the FZ-20 to get pics of kids in low
    > > light? This situation requires large lens openings, and yet
    > > reasonably fast shutter speeds because the little brats won't sit
    > > still. How should I set up these things to optimize the camera:
    > > -- white balance (does it have any effect?)

    >
    > No effect on the low light problem, but you want it set correctly for
    > the light source.
    >
    > > -- ISO - 80,100,200,400 (I assume 400 is best for low light)

    >
    > Noise will be awful, but 400 will give you the best chance of stopping
    > action without using the flash.
    >
    > > -- picture size (2560, 2048, 1600, etc.) (What effect does this have
    > > in low light?)
    > > -- quality (tiff, hi cmprsn, lo cmprsn)(What effect does this have in
    > > low light?)
    > > -- color effect (cool, warm)(What effect does this have in low light?)
    > > -- picture adjustment (contrast, sharpness, saturation, noise
    > > reduction)(What effect does this have in low light?)

    >
    > Each of these has a purpose unrelated to low light.
    >
    > > -- image stabilization (off, mode 1, mode 2)(What effect does this
    > > have in low light?)

    >
    > You want stabilization on. I find that my FZ30 works best in the mode
    > where the stabilizer only activates during exposure. If I recall,
    > that's mode 2.
    >
    > > Thanks for any info.

    >
    > You're basically toast. Suck it up and use the flash. Or, if it really
    > matters, you're rolling in money, and you don't mind lugging more gear,
    > go buy a DSLR. Sorry.
    >
    > Paul Allen
     
    Lew, Mar 25, 2007
    #4
  5. Lew

    dj_nme Guest

    Lew wrote:
    > Alrighty. I have begun lately to consider a DSLR. I want so badly to
    > get really photography of my grandaughters in low light situations
    > (with no flash) that I am trying to come up with a way to overcome the
    > marital difficulties such a purchase will almost certainly eventuate.
    >
    > Any recommendations for the new crop of DLSRs in the $800 to $1,200
    > range? I'd like to use SD cards for memory, but the main criteria is
    > to get crisp pics in average indoor lighting situations.
    >
    > lew


    If you wan to be able to use SD cards, then the obvious choice would be
    a Pentax DSLR camera.
    The most "bang for your buck" is likely to be the Pentax K100D: 6mp with
    CCD-shift anti-shake and one command jog wheel (for shutter speed, and
    aperture when pressing the +/-AV button).
    The next step up is the K10D: 10mp with CCD-shift anti-shake, weather
    sealing and two command jog wheels (one for aperture on the front and
    one for shutter speed on the back, thumb and fore-finger on the right hand).
    In Australia, the K10D is around $1300 ~ $1400 (about USD 1100) with
    Pentax kit lens.
    The K100D is around $850 ~ $950 (about USD 650) with a Sigma kit lens.
     
    dj_nme, Mar 25, 2007
    #5
  6. Lew

    Lew Guest

    dj_nme,

    I bought the K10D on your recommendation, and after having read as
    many road tests as I could. $900 at Circuit City. On one hand it
    does take superb pics, and the unique anti-shake system actually does
    give an extra stop or two of useful lens opening if the subject isn't
    moving too much.

    I am going to return it for the following reasons, in order of
    increasing importance.
    -- It is heavy.
    -- It doesn't take movies. I know this is a semi-pro camera not
    oriented toward gimmicky consumer needs, but I want a better camera to
    take pics of the Grandaughters. Occasionally I really do need to get
    something with sound and motion. The Panasonic FZ20 does this pretty
    well. It is not a very good camcorder, but it does an adequate job of
    getting some special moment.
    -- it doesn't give a live representation on the monitor of what the
    lense sees. With the past five digital cameras I've had, I got real
    used to being able to hold the camera away from my face when I
    actually take the shot. With the K10D I have to put my drippy nose on
    the camera and squint through the viewfinder to compose the shot,
    especially under rapidly changing grandkid types of situations.
    -- The thing is made in Vietnam. I lost too many family members and
    friends to those people. A dear childhood buddy is living out his
    life as a defeated cripple because of the torture he had to endure
    there. Just seeing the name of that country on the camera makes me
    feel strange.

    Are there any DSLRs that can present a real time view on the monitor
    of what the lense is seeing?

    Are there any DSLRs that can shoot simple movies?

    Thanks for the info.

    Lew

    > If you wan to be able to use SD cards, then the obvious choice would be
    > a Pentax DSLR camera.
    > The most "bang for your buck" is likely to be the Pentax K100D: 6mp with
    > CCD-shift anti-shake and one command jog wheel (for shutter speed, and
    > aperture when pressing the +/-AV button).
    > The next step up is the K10D: 10mp with CCD-shift anti-shake, weather
    > sealing and two command jog wheels (one for aperture on the front and
    > one for shutter speed on the back, thumb and fore-finger on the right hand).
    > In Australia, the K10D is around $1300 ~ $1400 (about USD 1100) with
    > Pentax kit lens.
    > The K100D is around $850 ~ $950 (about USD 650) with a Sigma kit lens.
     
    Lew, Apr 14, 2007
    #6
  7. On Mar 25, 9:30 am, "Lew" <> wrote:
    > Alrighty. I have begun lately to consider a DSLR. I want so badly to
    > get really photography of my grandaughters in low light situations
    > (with no flash) that I am trying to come up with a way to overcome the
    > marital difficulties such a purchase will almost certainly eventuate.
    >
    > Any recommendations for the new crop of DLSRs in the $800 to $1,200
    > range? I'd like to use SD cards for memory, but the main criteria is
    > to get crisp pics in average indoor lighting situations.


    Mmm... buy FujiFilm FinePix F20/F30/F31/F40 ?? This is a point-n-shoot
    camera. There are other Fuji cameras (the prosumer ones) which use the
    same chip and are equally good in low light: S9100/S6000 etc ?
     
    carrera d'olbani, Apr 14, 2007
    #7
  8. On Apr 14, 9:56 pm, "Lew" <> wrote:

    > -- it doesn't give a live representation on the monitor of what the
    > lense sees. With the past five digital cameras I've had, I got real
    > used to being able to hold the camera away from my face when I
    > actually take the shot. With the K10D I have to put my drippy nose on
    > the camera and squint through the viewfinder to compose the shot,
    > especially under rapidly changing grandkid types of situations.


    This is a rare voice in the crowd of the "old farts" who demand
    optical viewfinder in all newly released P&S cameras. They say they
    could not use the camera vithout the optical viewfinder. So, here are
    the reasons why you do not need it.

    > -- The thing is made in Vietnam. I lost too many family members and
    > friends to those people. A dear childhood buddy is living out his
    > life as a defeated cripple because of the torture he had to endure
    > there. Just seeing the name of that country on the camera makes me
    > feel strange.


    Uh-oh. My grandad was killed in the last war with Germans; so were
    about 1/3 of my male relatives of that generation. My life would be
    much better if my father grew up with his father. However... I keep a
    relationship with a German girl... I never asked her if your
    grandfather fought in that war (which he probably did). Sometimes I
    think how funny the things turned out. However, it is a new world,
    mate. Besides, I bet the Pentax camera is assembled in South
    Vietnam... and the ones who killed/injuerd your friends/relatives were
    from the communist North.
     
    carrera d'olbani, Apr 14, 2007
    #8
  9. Lew

    Skip Guest

    "Lew" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > dj_nme,
    >
    > I bought the K10D on your recommendation, and after having read as
    > many road tests as I could. $900 at Circuit City. On one hand it
    > does take superb pics, and the unique anti-shake system actually does
    > give an extra stop or two of useful lens opening if the subject isn't
    > moving too much.
    >
    > I am going to return it for the following reasons, in order of
    > increasing importance.
    > -- It is heavy.


    Heavy? Sheesh, you need to work out a little. Compared to the old film
    SLRs, and many current DSLRs, that thing is a featherweight.

    > -- It doesn't take movies. I know this is a semi-pro camera not
    > oriented toward gimmicky consumer needs, but I want a better camera to
    > take pics of the Grandaughters. Occasionally I really do need to get
    > something with sound and motion. The Panasonic FZ20 does this pretty
    > well. It is not a very good camcorder, but it does an adequate job of
    > getting some special moment.
    > -- it doesn't give a live representation on the monitor of what the
    > lense sees. With the past five digital cameras I've had, I got real
    > used to being able to hold the camera away from my face when I
    > actually take the shot. With the K10D I have to put my drippy nose on
    > the camera and squint through the viewfinder to compose the shot,
    > especially under rapidly changing grandkid types of situations.


    Some people prefer to do that, since holding a DSLR out at arms length
    increases the chances of having blurry images.

    > -- The thing is made in Vietnam. I lost too many family members and
    > friends to those people. A dear childhood buddy is living out his
    > life as a defeated cripple because of the torture he had to endure
    > there. Just seeing the name of that country on the camera makes me
    > feel strange.


    Odd, my father fought in WWII, and owned Exacta cameras after the war, made
    in East Germany. I drive a BMW and am married to a woman whose grandfather
    fought for Germany. Some people can get past that, some can't.
    >
    > Are there any DSLRs that can present a real time view on the monitor
    > of what the lense is seeing?


    The Olympus E-330 has a live preview screen. Panasonic makes a version, but
    it is more limited.
    >
    > Are there any DSLRs that can shoot simple movies?


    No.
    --
    Skip Middleton
    www.shadowcatcherimagery.com
    www.pbase.com/skipm
     
    Skip, Apr 14, 2007
    #9
  10. Lew

    Lew Guest

    I expected to see this kind of "get over it" comment. It is easy to
    make these kinds of shallow statements when you have been denied the
    experience of barely living through the trauma.

    I realize it is not logical to feel a strange combination of terror/
    anxiety/hate just from seeing the name of a country on a camera.
    There are plenty of cameras out there, however, that won't make me
    feel like kicking the dog every time I pick it up.

    Anyway, the situation with Germany is not analogous.

    So,... if there aren't any DSLRs that have live preview and/or movie
    capability, I suppose I'll just get along with my FZ-20 until there
    are.


    On Apr 14, 10:09 am, "carrera d'olbani" <> wrote:
    > On Apr 14, 9:56 pm, "Lew" <> wrote:
    >
    > > -- it doesn't give a live representation on the monitor of what the
    > > lense sees. With the past five digital cameras I've had, I got real
    > > used to being able to hold the camera away from my face when I
    > > actually take the shot. With the K10D I have to put my drippy nose on
    > > the camera and squint through the viewfinder to compose the shot,
    > > especially under rapidly changing grandkid types of situations.

    >
    > This is a rare voice in the crowd of the "old farts" who demand
    > optical viewfinder in all newly released P&S cameras. They say they
    > could not use the camera vithout the optical viewfinder. So, here are
    > the reasons why you do not need it.
    >
    > > -- The thing is made in Vietnam. I lost too many family members and
    > > friends to those people. A dear childhood buddy is living out his
    > > life as a defeated cripple because of the torture he had to endure
    > > there. Just seeing the name of that country on the camera makes me
    > > feel strange.

    >
    > Uh-oh. My grandad was killed in the last war with Germans; so were
    > about 1/3 of my male relatives of that generation. My life would be
    > much better if my father grew up with his father. However... I keep a
    > relationship with a German girl... I never asked her if your
    > grandfather fought in that war (which he probably did). Sometimes I
    > think how funny the things turned out. However, it is a new world,
    > mate. Besides, I bet the Pentax camera is assembled in South
    > Vietnam... and the ones who killed/injuerd your friends/relatives were
    > from the communist North.
     
    Lew, Apr 14, 2007
    #10
  11. Lew

    Lew Guest

    Not odd at all.

    The situation in Germany is not at all analogous.

    Your comment, "Some people can get past that, some can't" shows a
    casual ignorance,.. and not your fault at all. You don't have
    anything to get past, so you can dismiss these feelings quite easily.

    In any event, there are lots and lots of really nice cameras out there
    that don't have words on them that make me feel like Mr Hyde.

    > Odd, my father fought in WWII, and owned Exacta cameras after the war, made
    > in East Germany. I drive a BMW and am married to a woman whose grandfather
    > fought for Germany.
    >
    >
    >
    > > Are there any DSLRs that can present a real time view on the monitor
    > > of what the lense is seeing?

    >
    > The Olympus E-330 has a live preview screen. Panasonic makes a version, but
    > it is more limited.
    >
    >
    >
    > > Are there any DSLRs that can shoot simple movies?

    >
    > No.
    > --
    > Skip Middletonwww.shadowcatcherimagery.comwww.pbase.com/skipm
     
    Lew, Apr 14, 2007
    #11
  12. Lew

    Jerry Guest

    Lew wrote:

    > -- The thing is made in Vietnam. I lost too many family members and
    > friends to those people. A dear childhood buddy is living out his
    > life as a defeated cripple because of the torture he had to endure
    > there. Just seeing the name of that country on the camera makes me
    > feel strange.


    If you need a camera made in a country that has never been at war with
    the USA you are going to be without a camera. Time to move on mate.
     
    Jerry, Apr 14, 2007
    #12
  13. Lew

    Lew Guest

    Who said I "need a camera made in a country that has never been at war
    with
    > the USA" ??


    You make invalid assumptions.

    Even if I would have said something like that, we haven't been at war
    with China, eh? Where does the US get most of its stuff these days?

    Do you have any suggestions about DSLRs that have movie capability or
    how to use an FZ20 in low light situations?

    On Apr 14, 5:15 pm, Jerry <> wrote:
    > Lew wrote:
    > > -- The thing is made in Vietnam. I lost too many family members and
    > > friends to those people. A dear childhood buddy is living out his
    > > life as a defeated cripple because of the torture he had to endure
    > > there. Just seeing the name of that country on the camera makes me
    > > feel strange.

    >
    > If you need a camera made in a country that has never been at war with
    > the USA you are going to be without a camera. Time to move on mate.
     
    Lew, Apr 14, 2007
    #13
  14. Lew

    Jerry Guest

    Lew wrote:
    > Who said I "need a camera made in a country that has never been at war
    > with
    >> the USA" ??

    >
    > You make invalid assumptions.
    >
    > Even if I would have said something like that, we haven't been at war
    > with China, eh? Where does the US get most of its stuff these days?
    >
    > Do you have any suggestions about DSLRs that have movie capability or
    > how to use an FZ20 in low light situations?


    You could have a lot of trouble convincing Korean war vets thet the USA
    has never been at war with China. Why don't you blame Kennedy, Johnson
    and Nixon for your friends. They got, and kept the US in a needless
    war. It isn't all the fault of the Vietnamese people.

    Enough politics, I answered your DSLR questions in the other thread.
    There is a mirror in the way. Some cameras take movies, but not great
    ones. Most camcorders will take photos but not great ones. It's a
    compromise, and compromises don't tend to give great results. A good
    flash for your FZ20 will help, or seriously consider getting a camcorder
    and a DSLR for the best of both worlds. I have a Canon DSLR, an A530
    that will fit in my pocket if I'm can't carry the big camera, and a Sony
    camcorder. I use all three, and sometimes even the camera on my cellphone.

    regards,
    Jerry
     
    Jerry, Apr 14, 2007
    #14
  15. Lew

    ASAAR Guest

    On Sat, 14 Apr 2007 22:02:58 -0700, Roger N. Clark (change username
    to rnclark) wrote:

    > A couple of good low light smaller DSLRs you might look at
    > are the Canon 6-mpixel digital rebel (not rebel XT) and
    > the Nikon D50 (these are also cheaper).
    >
    > More info on this subject:
    >
    > http://www.clarkvision.com/imagedetail/does.pixel.size.matter
    >
    > http://www.clarkvision.com/imagedetail/digital.sensor.performance.summary


    Your entire reply is a good example of the type of well considered
    reply that I've been suggesting that you should aim for more often.
    Only one thing to add. Most of those two DSLRs you mentioned will
    have to be purchase used. Since the D50 was much more recently
    discontinued, it's still available new if you look hard enough, but
    prices are likely to be higher than desirable. For example, I saw
    it in at Best Buy with 18-55mm kit lens a week or two ago for $700.
    Too pricey since the body (new) last sold for $450 from B&H and for
    $400 from Adorama as refurbished/reconditioned by Nikon. Or maybe
    your unstated point was that a good used 6mp Rebel or D50 selling
    for well under $400 would be a good choice. If you can get your
    hands on a similarly inexpensive new D40 (not the 10mp D40x) to
    duplicate your D50 tests, you'll probably find that it does at least
    as well in low light for high ISO, low noise performance since they
    share very similar sensors.
     
    ASAAR, Apr 15, 2007
    #15
  16. Lew wrote:
    > Do you have any suggestions about DSLRs that have movie capability or
    > how to use an FZ20 in low light situations?


    There is no DSLR that has movie capability that I know of.
    There is a main reason for that: DSLRs are designed
    for speed and performance. Performance comes from viewing
    through an optical viewfinder, which is the highest
    real time you can get. If you have a LCD preview,
    when you want to take a picture, the "live preview"
    mode must be turned off, the scene metered, the
    focus set, sensor chip cleared and prepared for
    the exposure, then the exposure done.
    And the "live preview" is not real time, but delayed
    view as it takes time to read the chip, which is great
    if you want delayed pictures to miss the action! Next,
    the time to prepare the chip and determine the exposure
    takes a fair amount of time: people can turn away
    or the action is past peak before the P&S camera
    takes the picture (this is called shutter lag).
    The DSLR has independent electronics to focus and
    another set of electronics to measure and set exposure.
    The sensor chip sits behind a shutter ready to take
    the picture, so all that has to be done is raise the
    mirror and open the shutter. Even though this is
    a mechanical step, it takes less time than all the other
    stuff a P&S camera must do sequentially using the sensor.

    Low light performance is directly related to the pixel
    size (actually active pixel area). In general, P&S cameras
    have small pixels and DSLRs have large pixels. So,
    choose a P&S camera with the largest pixels you can find.
    That usually means less total pixels, like 5 megapixel
    P&S cameras often have larger pixels than 8 megapixel cameras,
    or choose a DSLR, again one with the largest pixels.
    In general, the smallest pixel size DSLRs are larger than
    the pixels in the largest pixel size P&S cameras.
    DSLRs also vary in pixel size. In general, 6-megapixel
    DSLRs have larger pixels than 8 and 10 megapixel DSLRs.
    A couple of good low light smaller DSLRs you might look at
    are the Canon 6-mpixel digital rebel (not rebel XT) and
    the Nikon D50 (these are also cheaper).

    More info on this subject:

    http://www.clarkvision.com/imagedetail/does.pixel.size.matter

    http://www.clarkvision.com/imagedetail/digital.sensor.performance.summary

    Roger
     
    Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark), Apr 15, 2007
    #16
  17. Skip wrote:
    > "Lew" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> dj_nme,
    >>
    >> I bought the K10D on your recommendation, and after having read as
    >> many road tests as I could. $900 at Circuit City. On one hand it
    >> does take superb pics, and the unique anti-shake system actually does
    >> give an extra stop or two of useful lens opening if the subject isn't
    >> moving too much.
    >>
    >> I am going to return it for the following reasons, in order of
    >> increasing importance.
    >> -- It is heavy.

    >
    > Heavy? Sheesh, you need to work out a little. Compared to the old
    > film SLRs, and many current DSLRs, that thing is a featherweight.


    ... and compared to many modern cameras, most DSLR+lens combinations are a
    lot heavier than the minimum kit required to capture an acceptable image.
    It's one reason why I haven't stuck with the older SLR format when moving
    to digital.

    David
     
    David J Taylor, Apr 15, 2007
    #17
  18. Lew

    Skip Guest

    "Lew" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Not odd at all.
    >
    > The situation in Germany is not at all analogous.
    >
    > Your comment, "Some people can get past that, some can't" shows a
    > casual ignorance,.. and not your fault at all. You don't have
    > anything to get past, so you can dismiss these feelings quite easily.
    >
    > In any event, there are lots and lots of really nice cameras out there
    > that don't have words on them that make me feel like Mr Hyde.


    I'm sorry, but you're wrong. I was speaking primarily of my dad. Vietnam
    was closer to me, I lost friends there, and some came back in pieces, both
    physically and mentally. But the changes there make any feelings of "Mr.
    Hyde" a little hard for me to hang on to. And my feelings, both then and
    now, about that war contribute to that.
    --
    Skip Middleton
    www.shadowcatcherimagery.com
    www.pbase.com/skipm
     
    Skip, Apr 15, 2007
    #18
  19. Lew

    Skip Guest

    "David J Taylor" <-this-bit.nor-this-part.co.uk>
    wrote in message news:abkUh.1854$...
    > Skip wrote:
    >> "Lew" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> dj_nme,
    >>>
    >>> I bought the K10D on your recommendation, and after having read as
    >>> many road tests as I could. $900 at Circuit City. On one hand it
    >>> does take superb pics, and the unique anti-shake system actually does
    >>> give an extra stop or two of useful lens opening if the subject isn't
    >>> moving too much.
    >>>
    >>> I am going to return it for the following reasons, in order of
    >>> increasing importance.
    >>> -- It is heavy.

    >>
    >> Heavy? Sheesh, you need to work out a little. Compared to the old
    >> film SLRs, and many current DSLRs, that thing is a featherweight.

    >
    > .. and compared to many modern cameras, most DSLR+lens combinations are a
    > lot heavier than the minimum kit required to capture an acceptable image.
    > It's one reason why I haven't stuck with the older SLR format when moving
    > to digital.
    >
    > David
    >

    "Acceptable" image quality is in the eye of the beholder, of course. Which
    is why I have eschewed non DSLRs for image about which I am serious.
    To boot, that Pentax, even with a lens, is lighter than the Sony R-1, for an
    example.

    --
    Skip Middleton
    www.shadowcatcherimagery.com
    www.pbase.com/skipm
     
    Skip, Apr 15, 2007
    #19
  20. Lew

    Skip Guest

    "Lew" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Who said I "need a camera made in a country that has never been at war
    > with
    >> the USA" ??

    >
    > You make invalid assumptions.
    >
    > Even if I would have said something like that, we haven't been at war
    > with China, eh? Where does the US get most of its stuff these days?
    >
    > Do you have any suggestions about DSLRs that have movie capability or
    > how to use an FZ20 in low light situations?
    >


    "Acceptable" is in the eye of the beholder, of course. Which is why I have
    eschewed non DSLRs for image about which I am serious.
    And, as has been pointed out, there are no DSLRs with "movie capability."

    --
    Skip Middleton
    www.shadowcatcherimagery.com
    www.pbase.com/skipm
     
    Skip, Apr 15, 2007
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Mike O.

    How low is "low light"?

    Mike O., Jan 3, 2004, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    15
    Views:
    612
    Michael Meissner
    Jan 4, 2004
  2. ishtarbgl
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    570
    ishtarbgl
    Apr 1, 2004
  3. D

    Sony HC5E low frame rate in low light

    D, May 21, 2008, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    12
    Views:
    639
  4. low end digital / low light and macro ?

    , Jun 27, 2008, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    19
    Views:
    669
    Chris Malcolm
    Jul 11, 2008
  5. Brian
    Replies:
    31
    Views:
    1,160
    Bob Larter
    Jun 14, 2009
Loading...

Share This Page