P&S loving idiots, beware...

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by Rich, Oct 29, 2005.

  1. Rich

    Rich Guest

    HDTV sales in the U.S. to grow 71 percent by 2009

    Television manufacturers will see a surge in cumulative HDTV sales
    over the next few years, which will boost the overall market value to
    $65 billion by 2009, according to "Adoption of High-Definition TVs and
    Services," a new study from Parks Associates.

    The report, which includes data from Parks Associates' "Mobile
    Entertainment Platforms & Services" study, finds consumers are growing
    less skeptical about HDTV, which is creating a gradual increase in
    demand for high-definition products and services. Nearly 47% of TV
    households in the U.S. plan to buy an HDTV in the next twelve months.
    This increase would boost HDTV sales by 30% and HD video services by
    38% by the end of 2006.

    "Consumers are beginning to see the true benefits of HDTV," said Deepa
    Iyer, a research analyst at Parks Associates. "Consumers who were once
    hesitant to spend huge dollars on an HDTV are now reconsidering this
    product category."

    As a result, service providers, including broadcasters, cable, and DBS
    operators, are beginning to feel a push to expand their HD video
    services in order to attract more HD subscribers. Service providers,
    content producers, television and chipset manufacturers, and other
    solution providers are all working to bring more high-definition
    products and services to market, although Iyer warns that they need to
    ramp up their efforts. The overall market penetration for
    high-definition televisions and services is very low. The current
    subscription rate for HD programming is barely 10% among all digital
    video subscribers, while only 35% of total HDTV households subscribe
    to HD video services.

    "It is a chain reaction," Iyer said. "An increase in HDTV sales will
    fuel the demand for other services including high-definition VOD,
    local content, primetime programming, and movies. However, this
    industry lacks a sense of urgency in its efforts to bring compelling
    HD services to consumers. It has to recognize that HDTV will become
    ubiquitous only if all collateral forces within come together to
    embrace the change."

    Parks Associates will further examine the issue of meaningful content
    delivery at the upcoming executive conference "Fall Focus: Making
    Media Meaningful," hosted November 9-11, 2005, at the Fairmont San
    Jose. With sessions such as "Enhancing the Television Experience via
    Interactivity" and "The "Eyes" Have It: Video Content on Consumers'
    Terms," this event will feature analysis and discussion on the
    expanding paradigm for video services.

    "Adoption of High-Definition TVs and Services" provides an analysis of
    the enablers, inhibitors, and opportunities for high-definition TVs
    and services in the U.S. It provides insight into service providers'
    strategies and consumer behavior patterns for next-generation services
    and applications.

    Source: Parks Associates




    This news is brought to you by PhysOrg.com
     
    Rich, Oct 29, 2005
    #1
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  2. Rich <> wrote:

    > HDTV sales in the U.S. to grow 71 percent by 2009
    >
    >Television manufacturers will see a surge in cumulative HDTV sales
    >over the next few years


    Another made-up story about what "will" happen.
    *yawn*
     
    Kimba W. Lion, Oct 29, 2005
    #2
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  3. Rich

    Goro Guest

    Kimba W. Lion wrote:
    > Rich <> wrote:
    >
    > > HDTV sales in the U.S. to grow 71 percent by 2009
    > >
    > >Television manufacturers will see a surge in cumulative HDTV sales
    > >over the next few years

    >
    > Another made-up story about what "will" happen.
    > *yawn*


    i think at least that part is inevitable as companies are producing
    fewer and fewere SD tvs...

    -goro-
     
    Goro, Oct 29, 2005
    #3
  4. On 28 Oct 2005 21:16:49 -0700, "Goro" <> Gave us:

    >
    >Kimba W. Lion wrote:
    >> Rich <> wrote:
    >>
    >> > HDTV sales in the U.S. to grow 71 percent by 2009
    >> >
    >> >Television manufacturers will see a surge in cumulative HDTV sales
    >> >over the next few years

    >>
    >> Another made-up story about what "will" happen.
    >> *yawn*

    >
    >i think at least that part is inevitable as companies are producing
    >fewer and fewere SD tvs...
    >


    Even though HDTV is the moniker for the new generation of TV monitor,
    the old NTSC stuff was never called SD.
     
    NunYa Bidness, Oct 29, 2005
    #4
  5. Rich

    Mark Jones Guest

    NunYa Bidness wrote:
    > On 28 Oct 2005 21:16:49 -0700, "Goro" <> Gave us:
    >
    >>
    >> Kimba W. Lion wrote:
    >>> Rich <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> HDTV sales in the U.S. to grow 71 percent by 2009
    >>>>
    >>>> Television manufacturers will see a surge in cumulative HDTV sales
    >>>> over the next few years
    >>>
    >>> Another made-up story about what "will" happen.
    >>> *yawn*

    >>
    >> i think at least that part is inevitable as companies are producing
    >> fewer and fewere SD tvs...
    >>

    >
    > Even though HDTV is the moniker for the new generation of TV monitor,
    > the old NTSC stuff was never called SD.

    What's your point?

    This is a new term used to discuss the two types of TV. The old type
    is being called SD at this point. What it was called in the past really
    does not matter.
     
    Mark Jones, Oct 29, 2005
    #5
  6. Rich

    Goro Guest

    NunYa Bidness wrote:
    > On 28 Oct 2005 21:16:49 -0700, "Goro" <> Gave us:
    >
    > >
    > >Kimba W. Lion wrote:
    > >> Rich <> wrote:
    > >>
    > >> > HDTV sales in the U.S. to grow 71 percent by 2009
    > >> >
    > >> >Television manufacturers will see a surge in cumulative HDTV sales
    > >> >over the next few years
    > >>
    > >> Another made-up story about what "will" happen.
    > >> *yawn*

    > >
    > >i think at least that part is inevitable as companies are producing
    > >fewer and fewere SD tvs...
    > >

    >
    > Even though HDTV is the moniker for the new generation of TV monitor,
    > the old NTSC stuff was never called SD.


    I'll accept that correction, but we just called it "tv" and that's
    ambiguous at this point. Right now, we do have HDTV and EDTV which
    naturally gives rise to the term SDTV to refer to the old "normal" tvs
    ("I remember back in the day when we used to just call it 'tv'...").
    Or should we call it NTSC-TV? I don't think it really matters, as long
    as you know what I mean...

    -goro-
     
    Goro, Oct 29, 2005
    #6
  7. On Sat, 29 Oct 2005 13:42:59 GMT, "Mark Jones"
    <> Gave us:

    >NunYa Bidness wrote:
    >> On 28 Oct 2005 21:16:49 -0700, "Goro" <> Gave us:
    >>
    >>>
    >>> Kimba W. Lion wrote:
    >>>> Rich <> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> HDTV sales in the U.S. to grow 71 percent by 2009
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Television manufacturers will see a surge in cumulative HDTV sales
    >>>>> over the next few years
    >>>>
    >>>> Another made-up story about what "will" happen.
    >>>> *yawn*
    >>>
    >>> i think at least that part is inevitable as companies are producing
    >>> fewer and fewere SD tvs...
    >>>

    >>
    >> Even though HDTV is the moniker for the new generation of TV monitor,
    >> the old NTSC stuff was never called SD.

    >What's your point?
    >
    >This is a new term used to discuss the two types of TV. The old type
    >is being called SD at this point. What it was called in the past really
    >does not matter.
    >

    Sure it does.
     
    NunYa Bidness, Oct 29, 2005
    #7
  8. Rich

    Jordan Guest

    It's like the people who lived in the "B.C." days... No, they didn't
    know they were living in "B.C." days and used a different scheme. But
    it got re-named after a big societal shift.

    What? We should all be using AUC still? We would get really tired of
    writing MMDCCLVIII on our checks. (This year is 2758 AUC - "From the
    Founding of the City" old Roman calendar.)

    - Jordan
     
    Jordan, Oct 30, 2005
    #8
  9. Rich

    Mark Spatny Guest

    On Sat, 29 Oct 2005 08:53:34 GMT, NunYa Bidness
    <> wrote:

    > Even though HDTV is the moniker for the new generation of TV monitor,
    >the old NTSC stuff was never called SD.


    NTSC is routinely called Standard Definition in the professional
    broadcast, consumer electronics, and television production industries.
    It has been in common use for at least 8 years. The fact that you
    aren't familiar with the term doesn't mean it isn't used.
     
    Mark Spatny, Oct 30, 2005
    #9
  10. Rich

    Guest

    Re: HDTV loving idiots, beware...

    Rich wrote:
    > HDTV sales in the U.S. to grow 71 percent by 2009
    >
    > Television manufacturers will see a surge in cumulative HDTV sales
    > over the next few years, which will boost the overall market value to
    > $65 billion by 2009, according to "Adoption of High-Definition TVs and
    > Services," a new study from Parks Associates.


    >BIG BORING SNIP<


    Yeah, it'll eventually be shoved down everybody's throats.

    The average monkey sitting at home doesn't give a shit about
    content or picture quality. They just want their TV valium......

    Will there be a government subsidy for the millions that can't
    afford this expensive new equipment?? HDTV is going nowhere
    until it is affordable to the masses.
     
    , Oct 30, 2005
    #10
  11. Re: HDTV loving idiots, beware...

    On 30 Oct 2005 14:15:22 -0800, Gave us:

    >Yeah, it'll eventually be shoved down everybody's throats.


    You're a goddamned retard. When color TVs came out, the old B&W sets
    were still available, and still were able to view the current
    broadcasts.

    You "I don't want to buy a new set" retards are the worst of the
    bunch. You like Pan and Scan too, dipshit?
    >
    >The average monkey sitting at home doesn't give a shit about
    >content or picture quality.


    You are an idiot, and you are three orders of magnitude below the
    average monkey. You give average monkeys a bad name, asshole.

    > They just want their TV valium......


    You really have your finger on the pulse of the American
    consumer.... NOT!

    >
    >Will there be a government subsidy for the millions that can't
    >afford this expensive new equipment??


    **** you. Do without, boy of little means.

    > HDTV is going nowhere
    >until it is affordable to the masses.


    You'r an idiot, and I believe there is no cure for you.
     
    NunYa Bidness, Oct 30, 2005
    #11
  12. Rich

    Alpha Guest

    Re: HDTV loving idiots, beware...

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > Rich wrote:
    >> HDTV sales in the U.S. to grow 71 percent by 2009
    >>
    >> Television manufacturers will see a surge in cumulative HDTV sales
    >> over the next few years, which will boost the overall market value to
    >> $65 billion by 2009, according to "Adoption of High-Definition TVs and
    >> Services," a new study from Parks Associates.

    >
    >>BIG BORING SNIP<

    >
    > Yeah, it'll eventually be shoved down everybody's throats.
    >
    > The average monkey sitting at home doesn't give a shit about
    > content or picture quality. They just want their TV valium......
    >
    > Will there be a government subsidy for the millions that can't
    > afford this expensive new equipment?? HDTV is going nowhere
    > until it is affordable to the masses.
    >


    As a fact, the government has appropriated big money to buy in subsidy
    converters for digital signals.
     
    Alpha, Oct 30, 2005
    #12
  13. Rich

    Alpha Guest

    Re: HDTV loving idiots, beware...

    The pot calling the kettle black.
     
    Alpha, Oct 30, 2005
    #13
  14. Rich

    Goro Guest

    Re: HDTV loving idiots, beware...

    wrote:
    > Rich wrote:
    > > HDTV sales in the U.S. to grow 71 percent by 2009
    > >
    > > Television manufacturers will see a surge in cumulative HDTV sales
    > > over the next few years, which will boost the overall market value to
    > > $65 billion by 2009, according to "Adoption of High-Definition TVs and
    > > Services," a new study from Parks Associates.

    >
    > >BIG BORING SNIP<

    >
    > Yeah, it'll eventually be shoved down everybody's throats.
    >
    > The average monkey sitting at home doesn't give a shit about
    > content or picture quality. They just want their TV valium......
    >
    > Will there be a government subsidy for the millions that can't
    > afford this expensive new equipment?? HDTV is going nowhere
    > until it is affordable to the masses.


    uhm, scary that you mention that. Apparently, there WILL be several
    hundreds of million $ allocated to supply people with HD2SD boxes so
    taht they can watch digital tv on their analog sd tv sets in 2009 (or
    whenever). I think the money for this is supposed to come from the
    auctioning of the exisitng analog bandwidth.

    I'll try to locate the link where i saw this.

    -goro-
     
    Goro, Oct 31, 2005
    #14
  15. Rich

    Goro Guest

    Re: HDTV loving idiots, beware...

    Goro wrote:
    > wrote:
    > > Rich wrote:
    > > > HDTV sales in the U.S. to grow 71 percent by 2009
    > > >
    > > > Television manufacturers will see a surge in cumulative HDTV sales
    > > > over the next few years, which will boost the overall market value to
    > > > $65 billion by 2009, according to "Adoption of High-Definition TVs and
    > > > Services," a new study from Parks Associates.

    > >
    > > >BIG BORING SNIP<

    > >
    > > Yeah, it'll eventually be shoved down everybody's throats.
    > >
    > > The average monkey sitting at home doesn't give a shit about
    > > content or picture quality. They just want their TV valium......
    > >
    > > Will there be a government subsidy for the millions that can't
    > > afford this expensive new equipment?? HDTV is going nowhere
    > > until it is affordable to the masses.

    >
    > uhm, scary that you mention that. Apparently, there WILL be several
    > hundreds of million $ allocated to supply people with HD2SD boxes so
    > taht they can watch digital tv on their analog sd tv sets in 2009 (or
    > whenever). I think the money for this is supposed to come from the
    > auctioning of the exisitng analog bandwidth.
    >
    > I'll try to locate the link where i saw this.
    >
    > -goro-


    ok, here's the link :

    (my mistake, not several hundred Million $, but $3B)

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/10/20/AR2005102001979.html

    WASHINGTON -- Lawmakers want to spend $3 billion to make sure millions
    of Americans won't wake up to blank TV screens when the country makes
    the switch to all-digital broadcasts.

    The subsidy was approved Thursday by the Senate Commerce Committee as
    part of legislation that would set April 7, 2009, as the firm date for
    television broadcasters to end their traditional analog transmissions
    and send their broadcasts via digital signals.

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    Digital television promises sharper pictures and better sound than
    analog TV. But millions of Americans with older TV sets rely solely on
    free, over the-air-television, and they'll need some type of a
    converter box to keep receiving their television service. Cable and
    satellite customers won't be affected.

    Committee Chairman Ted Stevens, R-Alaska, said Congress needs to do
    something to help consumers with the older analog sets, an estimated 21
    million households. "If we're mandating this (digital) conversion, we
    cannot leave people behind because they can't afford" digital
    television sets, he said.

    The draft of a House bill would end analog transmissions on Dec. 31,
    2008. It does not mention a subsidy for set-top converter boxes. So,
    lawmakers will likely have to work out differences between the two
    bills, though Stevens said he did not anticipate a big fight with the
    House over the deadline or the subsidy.

    The subsidy program would be paid for by money raised from the auction
    of the analog spectrum the broadcasters are vacating. The subsidy would
    be available for all those households with older televisions, and it
    would pay for converter boxes for all the TVs in a particular
    household, regardless of financial status.

    Stevens estimates that the converter boxes would cost about $50. His
    plan would call for the government to pay roughly $40, and the consumer
    would make a co-payment of $10.

    Some fellow Republicans have questioned whether the $3 billion is too
    high, given other spending priorities such as Hurricane Katrina
    recovery.

    The move to all-digital broadcasts will free valuable radio spectrum,
    some of which will be allocated to improve radio communications among
    fire and police departments and other first responders.

    Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., a member of the committee, tried to move up
    the hard date up by two years to April 7, 2007. But other senators said
    a sale in 2007, unlike one in 2009, wouldn't raise as much money for
    the converter boxes and for reducing the federal debt.

    McCain said first responders can't wait four years for the analog
    spectrum. "There's only one thing more important than money _ and
    that's lives," he told the committee before his amendment to speed up
    the conversion was defeated.

    The sale of the analog spectrum is expected to raise at least $10
    billion. Besides the $3 billion for converter boxes, the Senate bill
    proposes reserving $1 billion for public safety to buy new radio
    communications equipment and $250 million for a national alert system.
    Another $5 billion would be set aside for debt reduction.

    The seemingly random date of April 7, 2009, isn't all that random.
    Stevens wanted to make sure that any digital switch wouldn't come in
    the middle of popular programming during the holidays, football bowl
    games, and the March Madness college basketball playoffs.
    -goro-
     
    Goro, Oct 31, 2005
    #15
  16. Rich

    Mark Jones Guest

    Re: HDTV loving idiots, beware...

    wrote:
    > Rich wrote:
    >> HDTV sales in the U.S. to grow 71 percent by 2009
    >>
    >> Television manufacturers will see a surge in cumulative HDTV sales
    >> over the next few years, which will boost the overall market value to
    >> $65 billion by 2009, according to "Adoption of High-Definition TVs
    >> and Services," a new study from Parks Associates.

    >
    >> BIG BORING SNIP<

    >
    > Yeah, it'll eventually be shoved down everybody's throats.
    >
    > The average monkey sitting at home doesn't give a shit about
    > content or picture quality. They just want their TV valium......
    >
    > Will there be a government subsidy for the millions that can't
    > afford this expensive new equipment?? HDTV is going nowhere
    > until it is affordable to the masses.

    Were you born this stupid, or is a recent occurrence?

    HDTVs are dropping in price at a fairly rapid pace. I have
    two and it wasn't that big of a financial burden.
     
    Mark Jones, Oct 31, 2005
    #16
  17. Re: HDTV loving idiots, beware...

    On Sun, 30 Oct 2005 15:27:03 -0800, "Alpha" <> Gave us:

    >The pot calling the kettle black.
    >

    Hey, retard boy... If you don't quote the post you are replying to,
    nobody knows who the **** you are spewing your retarded tripe at.

    Bone up on Usenet, you retarded twit. I don't expect some retarded
    twit that uses Out House Express for a news client to have any grasp
    on reality, however.

    BTW, that has to be the most lame, most overused, baby bullshit
    remark ever made on Usenet, dipshit. Get a clue.
     
    NunYa Bidness, Oct 31, 2005
    #17
  18. Re: HDTV loving idiots, beware...

    >Will there be a government subsidy for the millions that can't
    >afford this expensive new equipment?? HDTV is going nowhere
    >until it is affordable to the masses.


    Anyone care to speculate on when HDTV might become affordable to the
    masses. I've been thinking about buying in for a long time, but it seems
    the cheapest projection model has never gotten below a 1,000, and the
    cheapest rear projector that does 1080i has never gotten below 2,500.
    Seems the trend it to bigger screen sizes, not smaller prices.
    --
    <<Spamfilter in Use>>
    Bloomington, MN <<to email, remove the "q" from address>>
     
    Monte Castleman, Oct 31, 2005
    #18
  19. Rich

    Biz Guest

    Re: HDTV loving idiots, beware...

    "Monte Castleman" <> wrote in message
    news:W5o9f.2502$...
    > Anyone care to speculate on when HDTV might become affordable to the
    > masses. I've been thinking about buying in for a long time, but it seems
    > the cheapest projection model has never gotten below a 1,000, and the
    > cheapest rear projector that does 1080i has never gotten below 2,500.
    > Seems the trend it to bigger screen sizes, not smaller prices.


    Depends on what you define as "affordable for the masses"

    THis past weekend there was a 51" HD-capable widescreen rear projection for
    under $900, 1080 capable...
    My 35" MITS tube tv was $1600 back in the day(about 10-12 years ago). So to
    me, HDTV's are extremely affordable...
     
    Biz, Oct 31, 2005
    #19
  20. Re: HDTV loving idiots, beware...

    >Depends on what you define as "affordable for the masses"

    $500 for a modest size set, say in the 32-35" range.
    $1250-$1500 for a rear projector.
    --
    Monte Castleman, <<Spamfilter in Use>>
    Bloomington, MN <<to email, remove the "q" from address>>
     
    Monte Castleman, Oct 31, 2005
    #20
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