OT - what species of bird is this please.

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Rudy Benner, Oct 8, 2006.

  1. Rudy Benner

    Rudy Benner Guest

    Rudy Benner, Oct 8, 2006
    #1
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  2. Rudy Benner

    Guest

    Rudy Benner wrote:
    > I would like to know what kind of duck I am looking at , the little one, not
    > the Mallard.
    >
    > http://rudybenner.com/album/DSC_0691.jpg

    Hi Rudy,
    That looks like a female Tufted Duck to me (named after the small tuft
    of feathers at the back of the head, which is much more noticeable in
    the male).
    Cheers,
    Mark
     
    , Oct 8, 2006
    #2
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  3. Rudy Benner

    Shawn Hirn Guest

    In article <>,
    "Rudy Benner" <> wrote:

    > http://rudybenner.com/album/DSC_0691.jpg


    Try posting your question on a newsgroup about birds, or send a reduced
    size version of that photo to your favorite zoo's docent to ask.
     
    Shawn Hirn, Oct 9, 2006
    #3
  4. Rudy Benner

    Rudy Benner Guest

    "Shawn Hirn" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In article <>,
    > "Rudy Benner" <> wrote:
    >
    >> http://rudybenner.com/album/DSC_0691.jpg

    >
    > Try posting your question on a newsgroup about birds, or send a reduced
    > size version of that photo to your favorite zoo's docent to ask.


    I did say it was OT, did I not?

    There is no zoo here.

    Anything else I can do for you to ruin your otherwise perfect day? A slap in
    the head maybe?

    r.
     
    Rudy Benner, Oct 9, 2006
    #4
  5. Rudy Benner wrote:
    > "Shawn Hirn" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> In article <>,
    >> "Rudy Benner" <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> http://rudybenner.com/album/DSC_0691.jpg

    >> Try posting your question on a newsgroup about birds, or send a reduced
    >> size version of that photo to your favorite zoo's docent to ask.

    >
    > I did say it was OT, did I not?
    >
    > There is no zoo here.
    >
    > Anything else I can do for you to ruin your otherwise perfect day? A slap in
    > the head maybe?


    I used to hunt these in Illinois many centuries ago, or so it would
    seem. We always called the colorful ones "Mallard Drakes". The other
    looks like a chick, so too soon to tell if it's a hen or drake.


    --
    john mcwilliams
     
    John McWilliams, Oct 9, 2006
    #5
  6. Rudy Benner

    Rudy Benner Guest

    "John McWilliams" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Rudy Benner wrote:
    >> "Shawn Hirn" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> In article <>,
    >>> "Rudy Benner" <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> http://rudybenner.com/album/DSC_0691.jpg
    >>> Try posting your question on a newsgroup about birds, or send a reduced
    >>> size version of that photo to your favorite zoo's docent to ask.

    >>
    >> I did say it was OT, did I not?
    >>
    >> There is no zoo here.
    >>
    >> Anything else I can do for you to ruin your otherwise perfect day? A slap
    >> in the head maybe?

    >
    > I used to hunt these in Illinois many centuries ago, or so it would seem.
    > We always called the colorful ones "Mallard Drakes". The other looks like
    > a chick, so too soon to tell if it's a hen or drake.
    >
    >
    > --
    > john mcwilliams


    It is most definitely not a Mallard. We have hundreds of those here, the
    bird in questions is quite different, much smaller, different body. A VERY
    good diver. The mallard chicks do not look like this one.

    We also have Common Loons, Cranes, and of course the damned seagulls.
     
    Rudy Benner, Oct 9, 2006
    #6
  7. Rudy Benner

    cjcampbell Guest

    cjcampbell, Oct 9, 2006
    #7
  8. Rudy Benner

    Sheldon Guest

    Rudy Benner wrote:
    > I would like to know what kind of duck I am looking at , the little one, not
    > the Mallard.
    >
    > http://rudybenner.com/album/DSC_0691.jpg


    The lower duck, with green neck, is definitely a male mallard. The
    upper duck, the one without the green neck is *definitely* a female or
    immature mallard (it's near impssible by visual alone to differentiate
    an immature mallard from a female mallard.
     
    Sheldon, Oct 9, 2006
    #8
  9. Sheldon wrote:
    > Rudy Benner wrote:
    >> I would like to know what kind of duck I am looking at , the little one, not
    >> the Mallard.
    >>
    >> http://rudybenner.com/album/DSC_0691.jpg

    >
    > The lower duck, with green neck, is definitely a male mallard. The
    > upper duck, the one without the green neck is *definitely* a female or
    > immature mallard (it's near impssible by visual alone to differentiate
    > an immature mallard from a female mallard.


    Whew! [see my post a bit before yours chronologically and rudy's reply]
    I thought my memory banks had been blown out. Our replies are virtually
    identical.

    --
    john mcwilliams
     
    John McWilliams, Oct 9, 2006
    #9
  10. Rudy Benner

    Rudy Benner Guest

    "John McWilliams" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Sheldon wrote:
    >> Rudy Benner wrote:
    >>> I would like to know what kind of duck I am looking at , the little one,
    >>> not
    >>> the Mallard.
    >>>
    >>> http://rudybenner.com/album/DSC_0691.jpg

    >>
    >> The lower duck, with green neck, is definitely a male mallard. The
    >> upper duck, the one without the green neck is *definitely* a female or
    >> immature mallard (it's near impssible by visual alone to differentiate
    >> an immature mallard from a female mallard.

    >
    > Whew! [see my post a bit before yours chronologically and rudy's reply] I
    > thought my memory banks had been blown out. Our replies are virtually
    > identical.
    >
    > --
    > john mcwilliams


    I am putting together a short pdf file which shows the Mallard drake, the
    Mallard hen (or immature mallard), and the bird in question.

    http://www.rudybenner.com/album/Birds.pdf

    The first page shows one drake and 3 hens (or immature), all Mallards. All
    the Mallards
    have orange feet. The mystery bird does not. It is considerably smaller than
    the Mallards. The bird in question is not a Mallard. All the Mallards I have
    seen have a dark eye, the bird in question has a golden eye. Note the
    difference in body structure.
     
    Rudy Benner, Oct 9, 2006
    #10
  11. Rudy Benner wrote:
    > "John McWilliams" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Sheldon wrote:
    >>> Rudy Benner wrote:
    >>>> I would like to know what kind of duck I am looking at , the little one,
    >>>> not
    >>>> the Mallard.
    >>>>
    >>>> http://rudybenner.com/album/DSC_0691.jpg
    >>> The lower duck, with green neck, is definitely a male mallard. The
    >>> upper duck, the one without the green neck is *definitely* a female or
    >>> immature mallard (it's near impssible by visual alone to differentiate
    >>> an immature mallard from a female mallard.

    >> Whew! [see my post a bit before yours chronologically and rudy's reply] I
    >> thought my memory banks had been blown out. Our replies are virtually
    >> identical.


    >
    > I am putting together a short pdf file which shows the Mallard drake, the
    > Mallard hen (or immature mallard), and the bird in question.
    >
    > http://www.rudybenner.com/album/Birds.pdf
    >
    > The first page shows one drake and 3 hens (or immature), all Mallards. All
    > the Mallards
    > have orange feet. The mystery bird does not. It is considerably smaller than
    > the Mallards. The bird in question is not a Mallard. All the Mallards I have
    > seen have a dark eye, the bird in question has a golden eye. Note the
    > difference in body structure.


    I have reached the limit of my wild fowl knowledge. Sorry.

    john mcwilliams
     
    John McWilliams, Oct 9, 2006
    #11
  12. Rudy Benner

    Go-dot Guest

    On Sun, 8 Oct 2006 13:40:27 -0400, "Rudy Benner"
    <> wrote:

    >I would like to know what kind of duck I am looking at , the little one, not
    >the Mallard.
    >
    >http://rudybenner.com/album/DSC_0691.jpg
    >



    Rudy:

    What you've got there is an immature Ring-neccked duck (Aythya
    collaris)

    The young ones often are missing the signature ring on the beak.

    Here's a picture of an older female:
    http://www.mangoverde.com/wbg/picpages/pic27-123-2.html

    Immature birds are perhaps the most difficult challenge in birding.

    John Hufnagel
     
    Go-dot, Oct 9, 2006
    #12
  13. Rudy Benner

    Rudy Benner Guest

    "Go-dot" <nospam@comcastnospamnet> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Sun, 8 Oct 2006 13:40:27 -0400, "Rudy Benner"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>I would like to know what kind of duck I am looking at , the little one,
    >>not
    >>the Mallard.
    >>
    >>http://rudybenner.com/album/DSC_0691.jpg
    >>

    >
    >
    > Rudy:
    >
    > What you've got there is an immature Ring-neccked duck (Aythya
    > collaris)
    >
    > The young ones often are missing the signature ring on the beak.
    >
    > Here's a picture of an older female:
    > http://www.mangoverde.com/wbg/picpages/pic27-123-2.html
    >
    > Immature birds are perhaps the most difficult challenge in birding.
    >
    > John Hufnagel


    You could well be right. I ran across that name several times today in my
    attempt to identify this creature. He is one heck of a good diver, makes the
    Mallards look poor. Not as good a diver as the Common Loons. We had two
    pairs of adults on the lake this summer, only one pair of young ones.
    Beautiful creatures. I have a couple of pictures of the juveniles
    somewhere.... lets see ....

    http://rudybenner.com/album/Timmins Stuff/2006 stuff/08 August/slides/DSC_8770.html

    and

    http://rudybenner.com/album/Timmins Stuff/2006 stuff/08 August/slides/DSC_8776.html

    and here is an adult with one of the chicks.

    http://rudybenner.com/album/Timmins Stuff/2006 stuff/07 July/slides/DSC_7555.html

    They will carry the chicks around on their back. Hard to get close enough
    for a good shot. I am limited to 300 mm.
     
    Rudy Benner, Oct 9, 2006
    #13
  14. Rudy Benner

    Sheldon Guest

    Rudy Benner wrote:
    > "John McWilliams" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Sheldon wrote:
    > >> Rudy Benner wrote:
    > >>> I would like to know what kind of duck I am looking at , the little one,
    > >>> not
    > >>> the Mallard.
    > >>>
    > >>> http://rudybenner.com/album/DSC_0691.jpg
    > >>
    > >> The lower duck, with green neck, is definitely a male mallard. The
    > >> upper duck, the one without the green neck is *definitely* a female or
    > >> immature mallard (it's near impssible by visual alone to differentiate
    > >> an immature mallard from a female mallard.

    > >
    > > Whew! [see my post a bit before yours chronologically and rudy's reply] I
    > > thought my memory banks had been blown out. Our replies are virtually
    > > identical.
    > >
    > > --
    > > john mcwilliams

    >
    > I am putting together a short pdf file which shows the Mallard drake, the
    > Mallard hen (or immature mallard), and the bird in question.
    >
    > http://www.rudybenner.com/album/Birds.pdf
    >
    > The first page shows one drake and 3 hens (or immature), all Mallards. All
    > the Mallards
    > have orange feet. The mystery bird does not. It is considerably smaller than
    > the Mallards. The bird in question is not a Mallard. All the Mallards I have
    > seen have a dark eye, the bird in question has a golden eye. Note the
    > difference in body structure.


    This is not the same as your first picture... the lone duck appears to
    be a scaup. Whether a lesser scaup or greater scaup is not clear....
    it would help to know where and when.
     
    Sheldon, Oct 9, 2006
    #14
  15. Rudy Benner

    Rudy Benner Guest

    "Sheldon" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > Rudy Benner wrote:
    >> "John McWilliams" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >> > Sheldon wrote:
    >> >> Rudy Benner wrote:
    >> >>> I would like to know what kind of duck I am looking at , the little
    >> >>> one,
    >> >>> not
    >> >>> the Mallard.
    >> >>>
    >> >>> http://rudybenner.com/album/DSC_0691.jpg
    >> >>
    >> >> The lower duck, with green neck, is definitely a male mallard. The
    >> >> upper duck, the one without the green neck is *definitely* a female or
    >> >> immature mallard (it's near impssible by visual alone to differentiate
    >> >> an immature mallard from a female mallard.
    >> >
    >> > Whew! [see my post a bit before yours chronologically and rudy's reply]
    >> > I
    >> > thought my memory banks had been blown out. Our replies are virtually
    >> > identical.
    >> >
    >> > --
    >> > john mcwilliams

    >>
    >> I am putting together a short pdf file which shows the Mallard drake, the
    >> Mallard hen (or immature mallard), and the bird in question.
    >>
    >> http://www.rudybenner.com/album/Birds.pdf
    >>
    >> The first page shows one drake and 3 hens (or immature), all Mallards.
    >> All
    >> the Mallards
    >> have orange feet. The mystery bird does not. It is considerably smaller
    >> than
    >> the Mallards. The bird in question is not a Mallard. All the Mallards I
    >> have
    >> seen have a dark eye, the bird in question has a golden eye. Note the
    >> difference in body structure.

    >
    > This is not the same as your first picture... the lone duck appears to
    > be a scaup. Whether a lesser scaup or greater scaup is not clear....
    > it would help to know where and when.
    >


    All shot the same place on the same day within minutes.
     
    Rudy Benner, Oct 9, 2006
    #15
  16. Rudy Benner

    Go-dot Guest

    Re: OT - what species of bird is this please. (now OT)

    On Mon, 9 Oct 2006 00:30:20 -0400, "Rudy Benner"
    <> wrote:

    >
    >>
    >> Rudy:
    >>
    >> What you've got there is an immature Ring-neccked duck (Aythya
    >> collaris)
    >>
    >> The young ones often are missing the signature ring on the beak.
    >>
    >> Here's a picture of an older female:
    >> http://www.mangoverde.com/wbg/picpages/pic27-123-2.html
    >>
    >> Immature birds are perhaps the most difficult challenge in birding.
    >>
    >> John Hufnagel

    >
    >
    >and here is an adult with one of the chicks.
    >
    >http://rudybenner.com/album/Timmins Stuff/2006 stuff/07 July/slides/DSC_7555.html
    >
    >They will carry the chicks around on their back. Hard to get close enough
    >for a good shot. I am limited to 300 mm.


    Rudy:

    We spend several weeks on a lake in New Hampshire each summer. This
    year, we saw several loons that came pretty close, but not close
    enough for the photo equipment I had on hand, my Canon 350D and 135mm
    lens, Next year I'll be bringing along 300mm, 500mm, and 600mm
    lenses. (Tamrons and Perkin-Elmer). Hopefully, the loons will be
    back, and come close enough for photos like yours (I love your shot of
    the two loons).

    Unfortunately, none of my longer lenses have IS technology, so
    technique is critical in getting a sharp image. I use my largest
    tripod (Bogen 3051) with a fluid head (3063) and emote release. I
    have to shoot from th shore, as the docks, which sit on rock piles,
    induce to much shake if I move!

    BTW, what kind of 300 did you use for the aforementioned shot?

    John.
     
    Go-dot, Oct 9, 2006
    #16
  17. Rudy Benner

    Paul Allen Guest

    On Mon, 9 Oct 2006 07:28:51 -0400
    "Rudy Benner" <> wrote:

    > > This is not the same as your first picture... the lone duck appears
    > > to be a scaup. Whether a lesser scaup or greater scaup is not
    > > clear.... it would help to know where and when.
    > >

    >
    > All shot the same place on the same day within minutes.


    Hmmm... Didn't answer the question. Could be because you're not
    a birder and don't know why the question matters. Or, you could
    be trolling. I'll assume the former and see where it goes.

    According to Sibley, the greater and lesser scaup have fairly
    dramatically different geographic distributions. The location
    and time of year of a siting helps to assign a probability to
    an identification.

    Actually, the best thing you could do is to go back out into the
    field and get some more images of the bird.

    Paul Allen
     
    Paul Allen, Oct 9, 2006
    #17
  18. Rudy Benner

    Rudy Benner Guest

    Re: OT - what species of bird is this please. (now OT)

    "Go-dot" <nospam@comcastnospamnet> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Mon, 9 Oct 2006 00:30:20 -0400, "Rudy Benner"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>>
    >>> Rudy:
    >>>
    >>> What you've got there is an immature Ring-neccked duck (Aythya
    >>> collaris)
    >>>
    >>> The young ones often are missing the signature ring on the beak.
    >>>
    >>> Here's a picture of an older female:
    >>> http://www.mangoverde.com/wbg/picpages/pic27-123-2.html
    >>>
    >>> Immature birds are perhaps the most difficult challenge in birding.
    >>>
    >>> John Hufnagel

    >>
    >>
    >>and here is an adult with one of the chicks.
    >>
    >>http://rudybenner.com/album/Timmins Stuff/2006 stuff/07 July/slides/DSC_7555.html
    >>
    >>They will carry the chicks around on their back. Hard to get close enough
    >>for a good shot. I am limited to 300 mm.

    >
    > Rudy:
    >
    > We spend several weeks on a lake in New Hampshire each summer. This
    > year, we saw several loons that came pretty close, but not close
    > enough for the photo equipment I had on hand, my Canon 350D and 135mm
    > lens, Next year I'll be bringing along 300mm, 500mm, and 600mm
    > lenses. (Tamrons and Perkin-Elmer). Hopefully, the loons will be
    > back, and come close enough for photos like yours (I love your shot of
    > the two loons).
    >
    > Unfortunately, none of my longer lenses have IS technology, so
    > technique is critical in getting a sharp image. I use my largest
    > tripod (Bogen 3051) with a fluid head (3063) and emote release. I
    > have to shoot from th shore, as the docks, which sit on rock piles,
    > induce to much shake if I move!
    >
    > BTW, what kind of 300 did you use for the aforementioned shot?
    >
    > John.
    >


    The loons were about 30 feet from shore. That was a 70-300mm Nikkor.
     
    Rudy Benner, Oct 9, 2006
    #18
  19. Rudy Benner

    Rudy Benner Guest

    "Paul Allen" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Mon, 9 Oct 2006 07:28:51 -0400
    > "Rudy Benner" <> wrote:
    >
    >> > This is not the same as your first picture... the lone duck appears
    >> > to be a scaup. Whether a lesser scaup or greater scaup is not
    >> > clear.... it would help to know where and when.
    >> >

    >>
    >> All shot the same place on the same day within minutes.

    >
    > Hmmm... Didn't answer the question. Could be because you're not
    > a birder and don't know why the question matters. Or, you could
    > be trolling. I'll assume the former and see where it goes.
    >
    > According to Sibley, the greater and lesser scaup have fairly
    > dramatically different geographic distributions. The location
    > and time of year of a siting helps to assign a probability to
    > an identification.
    >
    > Actually, the best thing you could do is to go back out into the
    > field and get some more images of the bird.
    >
    > Paul Allen


    I have plenty of images of the bird in question.

    The date and time are established by the EXIF data. The location is
    Northeastern Ontario.
     
    Rudy Benner, Oct 9, 2006
    #19
  20. Rudy Benner

    Alan Meyer Guest

    Rudy Benner wrote:
    > I would like to know what kind of duck I am looking at , the little one, not
    > the Mallard.
    >
    > http://rudybenner.com/album/DSC_0691.jpg


    Searching Google for "duck identification", the first hit I got was

    http://www.npwrc.usgs.gov/resource/birds/duckdist/index.htm

    which has images of the American ducks. There are other sites
    that look good too.

    Incidentally, as others have said, when inquiring about the
    identification of any plant or animal, it's best to give every
    piece of information you have - geographical location,
    setting (e.g., lake, river, salt water bay, etc.) date, time,
    approximate size (often not at all obvious from the photo,
    but I understand that you can't always estimate when
    you're shooting at a distance as in this case.)

    If you see any interesting behavior, report that too. For
    example, some ducks dive for food and may stay under for
    quite a while. Others just, well, "duck" their heads in the
    water, wiggling their feet and tails in the air.

    It's true, as you say, that the date and time may be available
    from the EXIF info, but why make each viewer hunt for info
    that you already have, and why exclude good naturalists who
    happen to be technically unsophisticated photographers?

    Alan
     
    Alan Meyer, Oct 9, 2006
    #20
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