OT: Very sad news. Jerry Goldsmith has passed away at age 75.

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by LASERandDVDfan, Jul 23, 2004.

  1. This struck me like a hammer on the head. My most favorite composer has died
    of cancer at the age of 75 on July 21.

    I always wanted to meet this guy, but I guess I'll never get the chance. His
    music has been inspiration to me for many things, and I am sure it has been
    inspiration to many other people in their lives, too.

    So long Mr. Goldsmith. You'll continue to live in your music and in our
    hearts. May your legacy of music also live on with your progeny. - Reinhart
    LASERandDVDfan, Jul 23, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. LASERandDVDfan

    Jay Stewart Guest

    Re: Very sad news. Jerry Goldsmith has passed away at age 75.

    "LASERandDVDfan" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > This struck me like a hammer on the head. My most favorite composer has

    died
    > of cancer at the age of 75 on July 21.
    >
    > I always wanted to meet this guy, but I guess I'll never get the chance.

    His
    > music has been inspiration to me for many things, and I am sure it has

    been
    > inspiration to many other people in their lives, too.
    >
    > So long Mr. Goldsmith. You'll continue to live in your music and in our
    > hearts. May your legacy of music also live on with your progeny. -

    Reinhart

    Sad, indeed - I have at least 16 movies in my collection that he scored most
    brilliantly.
    Jay Stewart, Jul 23, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. LASERandDVDfan wrote:
    > This struck me like a hammer on the head. My most favorite composer has died
    > of cancer at the age of 75 on July 21.
    >
    > I always wanted to meet this guy, but I guess I'll never get the chance. His
    > music has been inspiration to me for many things, and I am sure it has been
    > inspiration to many other people in their lives, too.
    >
    > So long Mr. Goldsmith. You'll continue to live in your music and in our
    > hearts. May your legacy of music also live on with your progeny. - Reinhart


    Goldsmith was the composer everybody thinks that borderline-plagiarist
    John Williams is.

    --

    "The world cares very little about what a man or woman knows; it is what
    a man or woman is able to do that counts."

    --Booker T. Washington
    Grand Inquisitor, Jul 23, 2004
    #3
  4. LASERandDVDfan

    luminos Guest

    I would reserve that remark for Horner (who I actually appreciate) rather
    than Williams (who is far more original than most acknowledge).

    "Grand Inquisitor" <> wrote in message
    news:pIfMc.228974$...
    > LASERandDVDfan wrote:
    > > This struck me like a hammer on the head. My most favorite composer has

    died
    > > of cancer at the age of 75 on July 21.
    > >
    > > I always wanted to meet this guy, but I guess I'll never get the chance.

    His
    > > music has been inspiration to me for many things, and I am sure it has

    been
    > > inspiration to many other people in their lives, too.
    > >
    > > So long Mr. Goldsmith. You'll continue to live in your music and in our
    > > hearts. May your legacy of music also live on with your progeny. -

    Reinhart
    >
    > Goldsmith was the composer everybody thinks that borderline-plagiarist
    > John Williams is.
    >
    > --
    >
    > "The world cares very little about what a man or woman knows; it is what
    > a man or woman is able to do that counts."
    >
    > --Booker T. Washington
    luminos, Jul 23, 2004
    #4
  5. In article <>,
    "luminos" <> wrote:

    > I would reserve that remark for Horner (who I actually appreciate) rather
    > than Williams (who is far more original than most acknowledge).


    Amen.
    Reginald Dwight, Jul 24, 2004
    #5
  6. LASERandDVDfan

    TB Guest

    Reginald Dwight wrote:
    > In article <>,
    > "luminos" <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I would reserve that remark for Horner (who I actually appreciate) rather
    >>than Williams (who is far more original than most acknowledge).


    I dunno. Danny Elfman has virtually built his career around nicking from
    Bernard Herrmann.

    T.B.
    TB, Jul 24, 2004
    #6
  7. LASERandDVDfan

    luminos Guest

    "TB" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Reginald Dwight wrote:
    > > In article <>,
    > > "luminos" <> wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > >>I would reserve that remark for Horner (who I actually appreciate)

    rather
    > >>than Williams (who is far more original than most acknowledge).

    >
    > I dunno. Danny Elfman has virtually built his career around nicking from
    > Bernard Herrmann.
    >
    > T.B.
    >


    Also very true...but Danny casts his net wider than Herrmann...and Horner
    wider still.
    luminos, Jul 24, 2004
    #7
  8. luminos wrote:
    > I would reserve that remark for Horner (who I actually appreciate) rather
    > than Williams (who is far more original than most acknowledge).


    Well both Horner and Williams "borrow" from other sources. I'd like to
    praise some of their work but I'm never sure if I'm really praising them
    or some other composer. Is there a list somewhere online of all the
    things these guys have taken?

    --

    "The world cares very little about what a man or woman knows; it is what
    a man or woman is able to do that counts."

    --Booker T. Washington
    Grand Inquisitor, Jul 24, 2004
    #8
  9. LASERandDVDfan

    Mike Kohary Guest

    Grand Inquisitor wrote:
    >
    > Goldsmith was the composer everybody thinks that borderline-plagiarist
    > James Horner is.


    I fixed your post.

    Mike
    Mike Kohary, Jul 24, 2004
    #9
  10. Mike Kohary wrote:
    >>Goldsmith was the composer everybody thinks that borderline-plagiarist
    >>James Horner is.

    >
    >
    > I fixed your post.
    >
    > Mike


    Can't we all get along? Horner and Williams *both* steal.

    --

    "The world cares very little about what a man or woman knows; it is what
    a man or woman is able to do that counts."

    --Booker T. Washington
    Grand Inquisitor, Jul 24, 2004
    #10
  11. LASERandDVDfan

    Mike Kohary Guest

    Grand Inquisitor wrote:
    > Mike Kohary wrote:
    >>> Goldsmith was the composer everybody thinks that
    >>> borderline-plagiarist James Horner is.

    >>
    >> I fixed your post.
    >>
    >> Mike

    >
    > Can't we all get along? Horner and Williams *both* steal.


    "Steal". <snicker> It's called "derivation", and every artist uses it.

    Mike
    Mike Kohary, Jul 24, 2004
    #11
  12. LASERandDVDfan

    luminos Guest

    I am just curious about the specific instances of what GI calls stealing in
    Williams' output.

    "Mike Kohary" <> wrote in message
    news:cduhe6$lf6$...
    > Grand Inquisitor wrote:
    > > Mike Kohary wrote:
    > >>> Goldsmith was the composer everybody thinks that
    > >>> borderline-plagiarist James Horner is.
    > >>
    > >> I fixed your post.
    > >>
    > >> Mike

    > >
    > > Can't we all get along? Horner and Williams *both* steal.

    >
    > "Steal". <snicker> It's called "derivation", and every artist uses it.
    >
    > Mike
    >
    >
    luminos, Jul 24, 2004
    #12
  13. LASERandDVDfan

    Mike Kohary Guest

    luminos wrote:
    > I am just curious about the specific instances of what GI calls
    > stealing in Williams' output.


    One example of Williams' music that's heavily derivative is the opening to
    the original Star Wars, as the Imperial Star Destroyer passes overhead -
    that's largely a play on Holst's "The Planets - Mars, God of War", which
    itself is a marvelous piece of early 20th century symphonic music. We
    studied both pieces together, and what you'd call Williams' work is an
    "homage", not stealing. Williams is a great admirer of Holst, after all.

    Aside from any of that, there's little question that Williams well deserves
    a place in the Movie Soundtrack Hall of Fame. His work is incredibly
    diverse and inventive, and is representative of the pinnacle of what movie
    music can accomplish. As for any accusations of "stealing", I think that's
    a specious point, for the reasons listed above. Hell, even Beethoven quoted
    Mozart, and Bach wrote the rules that all western music still uses today.
    The I-IV-V progression has been used in literally hundreds of thousands of
    pieces of music in the last 400 years. Anyone who calls it "stealing"
    doesn't know what in the hell they're talking about.

    Mike
    Mike Kohary, Jul 24, 2004
    #13
  14. Mike Kohary wrote:
    >>Can't we all get along? Horner and Williams *both* steal.

    >
    >
    > "Steal". <snicker> It's called "derivation", and every artist uses it.


    Is this sarcasm or are you really legitimizing an artist copying
    another's and passing it off as his own?

    --

    "The world cares very little about what a man or woman knows; it is what
    a man or woman is able to do that counts."

    --Booker T. Washington
    Grand Inquisitor, Jul 24, 2004
    #14
  15. luminos wrote:
    > I am just curious about the specific instances of what GI calls stealing in
    > Williams' output.


    Well I'm only reporting what other people have said, including John
    Harkness (think his opinions are crap, but he's knowledgeable).

    For instance, many have said the music for Star Wars "borrows" stuff
    from Mahler, and the theme to Kings Row.

    Go and Google some past newsgroup discussions on this. You'll find more
    info, and I don't want to cut and past a huge block of text.

    --

    "The world cares very little about what a man or woman knows; it is what
    a man or woman is able to do that counts."

    --Booker T. Washington
    Grand Inquisitor, Jul 24, 2004
    #15
  16. LASERandDVDfan

    luminos Guest

    "Mike Kohary" <> wrote in message
    news:cduk1m$t6s$...
    > luminos wrote:
    > > I am just curious about the specific instances of what GI calls
    > > stealing in Williams' output.

    >
    > One example of Williams' music that's heavily derivative is the opening to
    > the original Star Wars, as the Imperial Star Destroyer passes overhead -
    > that's largely a play on Holst's "The Planets - Mars, God of War", which
    > itself is a marvelous piece of early 20th century symphonic music. We
    > studied both pieces together, and what you'd call Williams' work is an
    > "homage", not stealing. Williams is a great admirer of Holst, after all.


    Holst's Mars is in 5/4 and completely different. This is nonsense. You do
    not know music at all.


    > Aside from any of that, there's little question that Williams well

    deserves
    > a place in the Movie Soundtrack Hall of Fame. His work is incredibly
    > diverse and inventive, and is representative of the pinnacle of what movie
    > music can accomplish. As for any accusations of "stealing", I think

    that's
    > a specious point, for the reasons listed above. Hell, even Beethoven

    quoted
    > Mozart, and Bach wrote the rules that all western music still uses today.
    > The I-IV-V progression has been used in literally hundreds of thousands of
    > pieces of music in the last 400 years. Anyone who calls it "stealing"
    > doesn't know what in the hell they're talking about.
    >
    > Mike
    >
    >
    luminos, Jul 24, 2004
    #16
  17. LASERandDVDfan

    luminos Guest

    Not true....any of it.

    Borrows from Mahler...NONSENSE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


    "Grand Inquisitor" <> wrote in message
    news:6zAMc.235353$...
    > luminos wrote:
    > > I am just curious about the specific instances of what GI calls stealing

    in
    > > Williams' output.

    >
    > Well I'm only reporting what other people have said, including John
    > Harkness (think his opinions are crap, but he's knowledgeable).
    >
    > For instance, many have said the music for Star Wars "borrows" stuff
    > from Mahler, and the theme to Kings Row.
    >
    > Go and Google some past newsgroup discussions on this. You'll find more
    > info, and I don't want to cut and past a huge block of text.
    >
    > --
    >
    > "The world cares very little about what a man or woman knows; it is what
    > a man or woman is able to do that counts."
    >
    > --Booker T. Washington
    luminos, Jul 24, 2004
    #17
  18. luminos wrote:
    > Not true....any of it.
    >
    > Borrows from Mahler...NONSENSE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


    Okay. Ask Harkness, he swears Williams plagiarised.

    --

    "The world cares very little about what a man or woman knows; it is what
    a man or woman is able to do that counts."

    --Booker T. Washington
    Grand Inquisitor, Jul 25, 2004
    #18
  19. >I would reserve that remark for Horner (who I actually appreciate) rather
    >than Williams (who is far more original than most acknowledge).


    James Horner isn't bad, but I do agree that he tends to rip off his own stuff.

    Case in point, a motif used for Khan in "Star Trek 2" would be repeated exactly
    in a scene on "Project X." Also, he would reuse a motif played on "Project X"
    with "Batteries Not Included" and "Honey, I Shrunk the Kids."

    But, if you really want to know of a composer who is REALLY bad about ripping
    off his own material shamelessly: Leonard Rosenman. I mean, listen to his
    score for the animated "Lord of the Rings" then listen to the score for "Star
    Trek IV: The Voyage Home." - Reinhart
    LASERandDVDfan, Jul 25, 2004
    #19
  20. >Goldsmith was the composer everybody thinks that borderline-plagiarist
    >John Williams is.


    While I love John Williams' music, I think Jerry Goldsmith is a superior
    composer. From what I've heard, he had a great personality, a good sense of
    humor, and is not afraid to experiment. - Reinhart
    LASERandDVDfan, Jul 25, 2004
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Mike T.

    OT: Sad News

    Mike T., Jun 10, 2004, in forum: MCSE
    Replies:
    12
    Views:
    768
    =?Windows-1252?Q?Frisbee=AE?=
    Jun 11, 2004
  2. Thomas Reed

    Quick Book file access very very very slow

    Thomas Reed, Apr 9, 2004, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    7
    Views:
    717
    Palindrome
    Apr 9, 2004
  3. Ed Ruf

    A very sad day for Nikon users.....

    Ed Ruf, Jul 31, 2003, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    344
    Ed Ruf
    Jul 31, 2003
  4. Thomusic
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    432
    Alpha
    Sep 3, 2005
  5. Tolzer

    Very Sad Indeed!

    Tolzer, Feb 4, 2004, in forum: MCDST
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    487
    Tolzer
    Feb 4, 2004
Loading...

Share This Page