OT Request for Comments

Discussion in 'Windows 64bit' started by mikew, Feb 19, 2007.

  1. mikew

    mikew Guest

    Sorry to post this in this group as it is way off topic, but, there are a
    lot of switched on people in here

    I've just got in from seeing a client
    I built a machine for him close on 12 months ago
    Some of the USB ports have failed so I have had to install another main
    board
    I explained to the client that because of the way oem Windows works I would
    have to install a fresh copy of Windows
    This I bought and have not charged for
    I also explained that this would mean a complete reformat of his hard drive
    with total loss of data and he should back up everything he see's fit
    He said that he backs everything up but would I do the same
    I agreed and asked him if he keeps everything in his Document and Settings
    folder or does he keep any data in any other locations
    He said that everything was in his Documents and Settings folder
    When I picked up his machine he added the fact that there were some emails
    that were very important and he must have them restored
    He asked if I could back them up and I said yes and backed up his Outlook
    Express folder

    The upshot is that when I have returned his machine and set up a firewall,
    antivirus software, anti malware/spyware software
    And configured his email client and restored all of his email
    And, then installed his Office suite
    And then installed his printer
    He then says where is all the stuff on my desktop
    To cut a long story short I had to say is that it did not exist any more
    It appears that there were some [very] important documents on there

    His argument is that I should have told him he should have backed up his
    desktop
    My argument is that if any data is important then it should be backed up on
    at least a daily basis

    I couldn't explain this as he was in a state of total loss of control and I
    really thought he was going to physically atack me
    He also said that he will be sueing me

    Can anyone suggest my best course of action here

    My initial feelings are to email him and explain that all I had to do was to
    replace his main board and install the Windows operating system
    Any data and programs should have been his responsibility
    The additional work was PR

    Given that a lot of people here work in the IT industry do you think this is
    a good idea or should I let him talk to his legal people who may tell him
    that he should have backed up his system first, before allowing the format
    of a hard drive, and then let him get back to me

    This is the first time I've been in this position and hope that if someone
    has been in this situation themselves they could let me know how they
    handled it

    Again, sorry this is so off topic but the only people that may have
    experienced this are here

    Mike
     
    mikew, Feb 19, 2007
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. I am not one of those IT professionals that you do otherwise meet here, but
    NOBODY keeps important files on the Desktop. If it is on the Desktop, then
    it is NOT important!

    Admit that you did what you did - but deny that anything important was lost
    in the process!

    But don't sit back and twiddle your thumbs - nobody can anticipate what a
    lawyer can come up with - stock up your arguments while waiting! And make
    your responses in a friendly and civilized tone, leave the anger for the
    other party - this guy may not be coming back, but everybody else is a
    potential costumer!


    Tony. . .


    "mikew" <> wrote in message
    news:eP%...
    > Sorry to post this in this group as it is way off topic, but, there are a
    > lot of switched on people in here
    >
    > I've just got in from seeing a client
    > I built a machine for him close on 12 months ago
    > Some of the USB ports have failed so I have had to install another main
    > board
    > I explained to the client that because of the way oem Windows works I

    would
    > have to install a fresh copy of Windows
    > This I bought and have not charged for
    > I also explained that this would mean a complete reformat of his hard

    drive
    > with total loss of data and he should back up everything he see's fit
    > He said that he backs everything up but would I do the same
    > I agreed and asked him if he keeps everything in his Document and Settings
    > folder or does he keep any data in any other locations
    > He said that everything was in his Documents and Settings folder
    > When I picked up his machine he added the fact that there were some emails
    > that were very important and he must have them restored
    > He asked if I could back them up and I said yes and backed up his Outlook
    > Express folder
    >
    > The upshot is that when I have returned his machine and set up a firewall,
    > antivirus software, anti malware/spyware software
    > And configured his email client and restored all of his email
    > And, then installed his Office suite
    > And then installed his printer
    > He then says where is all the stuff on my desktop
    > To cut a long story short I had to say is that it did not exist any more
    > It appears that there were some [very] important documents on there
    >
    > His argument is that I should have told him he should have backed up his
    > desktop
    > My argument is that if any data is important then it should be backed up

    on
    > at least a daily basis
    >
    > I couldn't explain this as he was in a state of total loss of control and

    I
    > really thought he was going to physically atack me
    > He also said that he will be sueing me
    >
    > Can anyone suggest my best course of action here
    >
    > My initial feelings are to email him and explain that all I had to do was

    to
    > replace his main board and install the Windows operating system
    > Any data and programs should have been his responsibility
    > The additional work was PR
    >
    > Given that a lot of people here work in the IT industry do you think this

    is
    > a good idea or should I let him talk to his legal people who may tell him
    > that he should have backed up his system first, before allowing the format
    > of a hard drive, and then let him get back to me
    >
    > This is the first time I've been in this position and hope that if someone
    > has been in this situation themselves they could let me know how they
    > handled it
    >
    > Again, sorry this is so off topic but the only people that may have
    > experienced this are here
    >
    > Mike
    >
    >
     
    Tony Sperling, Feb 19, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. mikew

    John Barnes Guest

    1. With OEM replacement of the mobo because of a defective mobo does NOT
    require another license. Activation, probably.
    2. No reason to reformat the hard drive.

    "mikew" <> wrote in message
    news:eP%...
    > Sorry to post this in this group as it is way off topic, but, there are a
    > lot of switched on people in here
    >
    > I've just got in from seeing a client
    > I built a machine for him close on 12 months ago
    > Some of the USB ports have failed so I have had to install another main
    > board
    > I explained to the client that because of the way oem Windows works I
    > would have to install a fresh copy of Windows
    > This I bought and have not charged for
    > I also explained that this would mean a complete reformat of his hard
    > drive with total loss of data and he should back up everything he see's
    > fit
    > He said that he backs everything up but would I do the same
    > I agreed and asked him if he keeps everything in his Document and Settings
    > folder or does he keep any data in any other locations
    > He said that everything was in his Documents and Settings folder
    > When I picked up his machine he added the fact that there were some emails
    > that were very important and he must have them restored
    > He asked if I could back them up and I said yes and backed up his Outlook
    > Express folder
    >
    > The upshot is that when I have returned his machine and set up a firewall,
    > antivirus software, anti malware/spyware software
    > And configured his email client and restored all of his email
    > And, then installed his Office suite
    > And then installed his printer
    > He then says where is all the stuff on my desktop
    > To cut a long story short I had to say is that it did not exist any more
    > It appears that there were some [very] important documents on there
    >
    > His argument is that I should have told him he should have backed up his
    > desktop
    > My argument is that if any data is important then it should be backed up
    > on at least a daily basis
    >
    > I couldn't explain this as he was in a state of total loss of control and
    > I really thought he was going to physically atack me
    > He also said that he will be sueing me
    >
    > Can anyone suggest my best course of action here
    >
    > My initial feelings are to email him and explain that all I had to do was
    > to replace his main board and install the Windows operating system
    > Any data and programs should have been his responsibility
    > The additional work was PR
    >
    > Given that a lot of people here work in the IT industry do you think this
    > is a good idea or should I let him talk to his legal people who may tell
    > him that he should have backed up his system first, before allowing the
    > format of a hard drive, and then let him get back to me
    >
    > This is the first time I've been in this position and hope that if someone
    > has been in this situation themselves they could let me know how they
    > handled it
    >
    > Again, sorry this is so off topic but the only people that may have
    > experienced this are here
    >
    > Mike
    >
     
    John Barnes, Feb 19, 2007
    #3
  4. mikew

    mikew Guest

    "Tony Sperling" <> wrote in message
    news:ONI%...
    >I am not one of those IT professionals that you do otherwise meet here, but
    > NOBODY keeps important files on the Desktop. If it is on the Desktop, then
    > it is NOT important!
    >
    > Admit that you did what you did - but deny that anything important was
    > lost
    > in the process!
    >
    > But don't sit back and twiddle your thumbs - nobody can anticipate what a
    > lawyer can come up with - stock up your arguments while waiting! And make
    > your responses in a friendly and civilized tone, leave the anger for the
    > other party - this guy may not be coming back, but everybody else is a
    > potential costumer!
    >
    >
    > Tony. . .



    Tony, he did keep very important files on his desktop, why I can't fathom,
    but the situation has a better ending

    I don't know how this passed me by but I'd got his desktop copied when I
    backed up his Docs and Settings
    I've given the details of where they are to his secretary, he'll get them
    later on this evening

    I guess that having someone breathing down your neck late on a Sunday night
    makes you miss obviouse things that are normally second nature

    Thanks for your reply
     
    mikew, Feb 19, 2007
    #4
  5. mikew

    mikew Guest

    "John Barnes" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > 1. With OEM replacement of the mobo because of a defective mobo does NOT
    > require another license. Activation, probably.
    > 2. No reason to reformat the hard drive.


    John

    I'm a little confused here
    I thought that OEM copies of Windows died with the machine
     
    mikew, Feb 19, 2007
    #5
  6. Ah - what joy! Best possible outcome, at the face of it. Let's hope the
    experience taught the 'man' a lesson.


    Tony. . .


    "mikew" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > "Tony Sperling" <> wrote in message
    > news:ONI%...
    > >I am not one of those IT professionals that you do otherwise meet here,

    but
    > > NOBODY keeps important files on the Desktop. If it is on the Desktop,

    then
    > > it is NOT important!
    > >
    > > Admit that you did what you did - but deny that anything important was
    > > lost
    > > in the process!
    > >
    > > But don't sit back and twiddle your thumbs - nobody can anticipate what

    a
    > > lawyer can come up with - stock up your arguments while waiting! And

    make
    > > your responses in a friendly and civilized tone, leave the anger for the
    > > other party - this guy may not be coming back, but everybody else is a
    > > potential costumer!
    > >
    > >
    > > Tony. . .

    >
    >
    > Tony, he did keep very important files on his desktop, why I can't fathom,
    > but the situation has a better ending
    >
    > I don't know how this passed me by but I'd got his desktop copied when I
    > backed up his Docs and Settings
    > I've given the details of where they are to his secretary, he'll get them
    > later on this evening
    >
    > I guess that having someone breathing down your neck late on a Sunday

    night
    > makes you miss obviouse things that are normally second nature
    >
    > Thanks for your reply
    >
    >
     
    Tony Sperling, Feb 19, 2007
    #6
  7. mikew

    John Barnes Guest

    Replacement of a defective mobo is a specific exception.

    "mikew" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > "John Barnes" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> 1. With OEM replacement of the mobo because of a defective mobo does NOT
    >> require another license. Activation, probably.
    >> 2. No reason to reformat the hard drive.

    >
    > John
    >
    > I'm a little confused here
    > I thought that OEM copies of Windows died with the machine
    >
    >
     
    John Barnes, Feb 19, 2007
    #7
  8. mikew

    John Barnes Guest

    This is for pre-activated OEM, but is applicable to all OEM installations,
    check your system builders section of Microsoft.com
    http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/winxppro/deploy/oempreac.mspx
    (e.g., after the replacement of a defective motherboard) they can do so via
    phone-based activation.

    "mikew" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > "John Barnes" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> 1. With OEM replacement of the mobo because of a defective mobo does NOT
    >> require another license. Activation, probably.
    >> 2. No reason to reformat the hard drive.

    >
    > John
    >
    > I'm a little confused here
    > I thought that OEM copies of Windows died with the machine
    >
    >
     
    John Barnes, Feb 19, 2007
    #8
  9. mikew wrote:
    > Sorry to post this in this group as it is way off topic, but, there are a
    > lot of switched on people in here
    >
    > I've just got in from seeing a client
    > I built a machine for him close on 12 months ago
    > Some of the USB ports have failed so I have had to install another main
    > board
    > I explained to the client that because of the way oem Windows works I would
    > have to install a fresh copy of Windows



    So, do you always lie to your clients?


    > This I bought and have not charged for



    What a rip off. I hope your client reports you to the local law
    enforcement agencies.


    > I also explained that this would mean a complete reformat of his hard drive



    Yet another lie. (Are are you just completely and utterly incompetent?)


    > with total loss of data and he should back up everything he see's fit
    > He said that he backs everything up but would I do the same
    > I agreed ....



    And yet, from what follows, it's clear that this was yet another lie.


    > .... and asked him if he keeps everything in his Document and Settings
    > folder or does he keep any data in any other locations
    > He said that everything was in his Documents and Settings folder



    (Hint: This is where the Desktop folder is located; had you done as
    you had said you would do, you wouldn't be in this position now.)


    > When I picked up his machine he added the fact that there were some emails
    > that were very important and he must have them restored
    > He asked if I could back them up and I said yes and backed up his Outlook
    > Express folder
    >



    Why? That's not where OE stores emails, as any competent tech will
    tell you. The default location is C:\Documents and
    Settings\username\Local Settings\Application Data\Microsoft\Outlook
    Express\.


    > The upshot is that when I have returned his machine and set up a firewall,
    > antivirus software, anti malware/spyware software
    > And configured his email client and restored all of his email
    > And, then installed his Office suite
    > And then installed his printer
    > He then says where is all the stuff on my desktop
    > To cut a long story short I had to say is that it did not exist any more
    > It appears that there were some [very] important documents on there
    >
    > His argument is that I should have told him he should have backed up his
    > desktop



    Well, yes. As you were advising him, you should have warned him to
    back up all of the locations in which he might have stored data, naming
    the most commonly used locations, such as the desktop, specifically.


    > My argument is that if any data is important then it should be backed up on
    > at least a daily basis
    >


    "Daily" is probably a bit extreme, but you're correct, in principle.
    Important data should be backed up frequently.


    > I couldn't explain this as he was in a state of total loss of control and I
    > really thought he was going to physically atack me
    > He also said that he will be sueing me
    >



    Given your above reported lies and incompetence, I can't say as I blame
    him.


    > Can anyone suggest my best course of action here
    >


    Hire a good lawyer, and promise to learn something about computers in
    general and WinXP in particular before working on any more.


    > My initial feelings are to email him and explain that all I had to do was to
    > replace his main board and install the Windows operating system
    > Any data and programs should have been his responsibility



    Had you warned him of this in advance, rather than falsely promising to
    preserve his data, you'd have a point. But that's not the way you say
    it happened. You promised to back up his data when you clearly made no
    serious attempt to do so.


    > The additional work was PR
    >
    > Given that a lot of people here work in the IT industry do you think this is
    > a good idea or should I let him talk to his legal people who may tell him
    > that he should have backed up his system first, before allowing the format
    > of a hard drive, and then let him get back to me
    >



    As an IT professional, I think you should get a good lawyer, settle for
    as little as you can, and then find another line of work. Your callous
    actions give the entire industry a bad name.





    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
    http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary
    safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. -Benjamin Franklin

    Many people would rather die than think; in fact, most do. -Bertrand Russell
     
    Bruce Chambers, Feb 19, 2007
    #9
  10. Tony Sperling wrote:
    > I am not one of those IT professionals that you do otherwise meet here, but
    > NOBODY keeps important files on the Desktop. If it is on the Desktop, then
    > it is NOT important!
    >



    If you were an IT professional, you'd know that the desktop is exactly
    where many users keep their frequently used and important data files.
    (Users don't have the training a professional does, you see.)


    > Admit that you did what you did - but deny that anything important was lost
    > in the process!
    >



    He's already repeatedly lied to the customer, and you're advising him
    to lie again?




    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
    http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary
    safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. -Benjamin Franklin

    Many people would rather die than think; in fact, most do. -Bertrand Russell
     
    Bruce Chambers, Feb 19, 2007
    #10
  11. mikew wrote:
    >
    > John
    >
    > I'm a little confused here
    > I thought that OEM copies of Windows died with the machine
    >
    >



    According to its EULA, an OEM license may not be transferred from
    one distinct PC to another PC. Nothing is said about prohibiting one
    from repairing or upgrading the PC on which an OEM license is installed.


    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
    http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary
    safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. -Benjamin Franklin

    Many people would rather die than think; in fact, most do. -Bertrand Russell
     
    Bruce Chambers, Feb 19, 2007
    #11
  12. mikew

    Dshai Guest

    While the advice of the backup was good, the most you would've had to do
    under the circumstances would be a repair install then re-activate, possibly
    thru the phone rather than internet.

    --

    Dshai

    Life is only limited by those living it...

    "mikew" <> wrote in message
    news:eP%...
    > Sorry to post this in this group as it is way off topic, but, there are a
    > lot of switched on people in here
    >
    > I've just got in from seeing a client
    > I built a machine for him close on 12 months ago
    > Some of the USB ports have failed so I have had to install another main
    > board
    > I explained to the client that because of the way oem Windows works I
    > would have to install a fresh copy of Windows
    > This I bought and have not charged for
    > I also explained that this would mean a complete reformat of his hard
    > drive with total loss of data and he should back up everything he see's
    > fit
    > He said that he backs everything up but would I do the same
    > I agreed and asked him if he keeps everything in his Document and Settings
    > folder or does he keep any data in any other locations
    > He said that everything was in his Documents and Settings folder
    > When I picked up his machine he added the fact that there were some emails
    > that were very important and he must have them restored
    > He asked if I could back them up and I said yes and backed up his Outlook
    > Express folder
    >
    > The upshot is that when I have returned his machine and set up a firewall,
    > antivirus software, anti malware/spyware software
    > And configured his email client and restored all of his email
    > And, then installed his Office suite
    > And then installed his printer
    > He then says where is all the stuff on my desktop
    > To cut a long story short I had to say is that it did not exist any more
    > It appears that there were some [very] important documents on there
    >
    > His argument is that I should have told him he should have backed up his
    > desktop
    > My argument is that if any data is important then it should be backed up
    > on at least a daily basis
    >
    > I couldn't explain this as he was in a state of total loss of control and
    > I really thought he was going to physically atack me
    > He also said that he will be sueing me
    >
    > Can anyone suggest my best course of action here
    >
    > My initial feelings are to email him and explain that all I had to do was
    > to replace his main board and install the Windows operating system
    > Any data and programs should have been his responsibility
    > The additional work was PR
    >
    > Given that a lot of people here work in the IT industry do you think this
    > is a good idea or should I let him talk to his legal people who may tell
    > him that he should have backed up his system first, before allowing the
    > format of a hard drive, and then let him get back to me
    >
    > This is the first time I've been in this position and hope that if someone
    > has been in this situation themselves they could let me know how they
    > handled it
    >
    > Again, sorry this is so off topic but the only people that may have
    > experienced this are here
    >
    > Mike
    >
     
    Dshai, Feb 20, 2007
    #12
  13. This is supposed to be a friendly forum.

    He's not in the position he thought, and has publicly acknowldged it.

    What he *should* have done is taken an extra 20 or 30 minutes, fired up
    Mcrosoft Backup, and directed the backup to an IDE drive connected as
    described above. All user data bundled up into one file, which can be
    transferred back to the [newly-formatted] drive and left at the scene of the
    crime <g>.

    ----- Original Message -----
    From: "Bruce Chambers" <3t>
    Newsgroups: microsoft.public.windows.64bit.general
    Sent: Monday, February 19, 2007 9:44 AM
    Subject: Re: OT Request for Comments


    > mikew wrote:
    >> Sorry to post this in this group as it is way off topic, but, there are a
    >> lot of switched on people in here
    >>
    >> I've just got in from seeing a client
    >> I built a machine for him close on 12 months ago
    >> Some of the USB ports have failed so I have had to install another main
    >> board
    >> I explained to the client that because of the way oem Windows works I
    >> would have to install a fresh copy of Windows

    >
    >
    > So, do you always lie to your clients?


    Give the length and complexity of the EULA, I might have advised the same -
    particularly if a business operation depended on it.

    >> This I bought and have not charged for

    >
    >
    > What a rip off. I hope your client reports you to the local law
    > enforcement agencies.


    If someone were to buy me a free replacement install of Windows and throw it
    in complimentary to the task at hand, I'd probably use the service/person
    again.

    >> I also explained that this would mean a complete reformat of his hard
    >> drive

    >
    >
    > Yet another lie. (Are are you just completely and utterly incompetent?)


    But it's common advice to *not* install a copy of Windows on top of an
    existing [patched] installation.

    >> with total loss of data and he should back up everything he see's fit
    >> He said that he backs everything up but would I do the same
    >> I agreed ....

    >
    >
    > And yet, from what follows, it's clear that this was yet another lie.


    I wrote off-list that an external IDE drive in a USB case is cheap insurance
    compared to the events at hand.

    Technicians should *always* be prepared to back up *everything* if it's not
    their own computer.


    >> .... and asked him if he keeps everything in his Document and Settings
    >> folder or does he keep any data in any other locations
    >> He said that everything was in his Documents and Settings folder

    >
    >
    > (Hint: This is where the Desktop folder is located; had you done as you
    > had said you would do, you wouldn't be in this position now.)


    He *has* realized that - it took a simple off-list reply. He's not *really*
    in that position.

    >> When I picked up his machine he added the fact that there were some
    >> emails that were very important and he must have them restored
    >> He asked if I could back them up and I said yes and backed up his Outlook
    >> Express folder
    >>

    >
    > Why? That's not where OE stores emails, as any competent tech will tell
    > you. The default location is C:\Documents and Settings\username\Local
    > Settings\Application Data\Microsoft\Outlook Express\.


    Because Microsoft has a knowledge base article out there on how to back up
    mail, and because OE gives one the capability of spcifying a different
    location for the mail store???

    >> The upshot is that when I have returned his machine and set up a
    >> firewall, antivirus software, anti malware/spyware software
    >> And configured his email client and restored all of his email
    >> And, then installed his Office suite
    >> And then installed his printer
    >> He then says where is all the stuff on my desktop
    >> To cut a long story short I had to say is that it did not exist any more
    >> It appears that there were some [very] important documents on there
    >>
    >> His argument is that I should have told him he should have backed up his
    >> desktop

    >
    >
    > Well, yes. As you were advising him, you should have warned him to back
    > up all of the locations in which he might have stored data, naming the
    > most commonly used locations, such as the desktop, specifically.
    >
    >
    >> My argument is that if any data is important then it should be backed up
    >> on at least a daily basis
    >>

    >
    > "Daily" is probably a bit extreme, but you're correct, in principle.
    > Important data should be backed up frequently.


    What he *should* have done is taken an extra 20 or 30 minutes, fired up
    Mcrosoft Backup, and directed the backup to an IDE drive connected as
    described above. All user data bundled up into one file, which can be
    transferred back to the [newly-formatted] drive and left at the scene of the
    crime <g>.


    >> I couldn't explain this as he was in a state of total loss of control and
    >> I really thought he was going to physically atack me
    >> He also said that he will be sueing me
    >>

    >
    >
    > Given your above reported lies and incompetence, I can't say as I blame
    > him.



    I would have approached the project the same way once upon a time, but I
    have since learned better, and through making mistakes. I'm sure others
    here have learning experiences they could describe of similar situations.

    >> Can anyone suggest my best course of action here
    >>

    >
    > Hire a good lawyer, and promise to learn something about computers in
    > general and WinXP in particular before working on any more.
    >
    >


    The former point is less than helpful. IMHO, the latter could be said of
    just about everyone (ncluding some MSFT technical support people I have
    dealt with over the years).

    >> My initial feelings are to email him and explain that all I had to do was
    >> to replace his main board and install the Windows operating system
    >> Any data and programs should have been his responsibility

    >
    >
    > Had you warned him of this in advance, rather than falsely promising to
    > preserve his data, you'd have a point. But that's not the way you say it
    > happened. You promised to back up his data when you clearly made no
    > serious attempt to do so.


    It takes a truly expert technician to hunt down and locate all the nooks and
    crannies in which an end user or a program could have hidden data away. The
    MSFT standard is to run the Transfer Wizard and have a nice day.

    >> The additional work was PR
    >>
    >> Given that a lot of people here work in the IT industry do you think this
    >> is a good idea or should I let him talk to his legal people who may tell
    >> him that he should have backed up his system first, before allowing the
    >> format of a hard drive, and then let him get back to me
    >>

    >
    >
    > As an IT professional, I think you should get a good lawyer, settle for as
    > little as you can, and then find another line of work. Your callous
    > actions give the entire industry a bad name.


    Anyone who has attained perfect enlightenment in an operating system made up
    of 4.3 million lines of code and every situation in using it or maintaining
    it need not waterproof his shoes.
     
    Charles Chambers, Feb 20, 2007
    #13
  14. "Dshai" <> wrote in message
    news:%230afZ$...
    > While the advice of the backup was good, the most you would've had to do
    > under the circumstances would be a repair install then re-activate,
    > possibly thru the phone rather than internet.
    >

    I was doing technical support for an ISP when a techie threw out just that
    same tidbit of advice.

    We paid the customer $750 in damages, one of our technicians $12.50/hour for
    8 hours to reinstall Windows and what software the guy *did* have, and paid
    for replacement copies of software for which he no longer had the media.

    Part of the eight hours was for moving "important files" back into locations
    the customer could access. The interface *does* make it easy to set up
    files or folders anywhere, and to put shortcuts to them on the desktop.

    Backups are a good thing. USB ports make it particularly easy. This
    situation is the*only* one in which I've found Microsoft's Backup utility
    useful. Reinstalling Windows to a second drive in order to restore the
    entire target drive exactly is *so* time consuming, and still makes good use
    of an IDE/USB drive setup.
     
    Charles Chambers, Feb 20, 2007
    #14
  15. mikew

    Dshai Guest

    And I didn't recommend the process without first running a backup, only that
    it probably would've solved the problem, I've done it several times myself,
    yes, on a couple of occasions it didn't work, but there were backups to fall
    back on in those instances.

    --

    Dshai

    Life is only limited by those living it...

    "Charles Chambers @cisaz.com>" <cchamb2<2> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > "Dshai" <> wrote in message
    > news:%230afZ$...
    >> While the advice of the backup was good, the most you would've had to do
    >> under the circumstances would be a repair install then re-activate,
    >> possibly thru the phone rather than internet.
    >>

    > I was doing technical support for an ISP when a techie threw out just that
    > same tidbit of advice.
    >
    > We paid the customer $750 in damages, one of our technicians $12.50/hour
    > for 8 hours to reinstall Windows and what software the guy *did* have, and
    > paid for replacement copies of software for which he no longer had the
    > media.
    >
    > Part of the eight hours was for moving "important files" back into
    > locations the customer could access. The interface *does* make it easy to
    > set up files or folders anywhere, and to put shortcuts to them on the
    > desktop.
    >
    > Backups are a good thing. USB ports make it particularly easy. This
    > situation is the*only* one in which I've found Microsoft's Backup utility
    > useful. Reinstalling Windows to a second drive in order to restore the
    > entire target drive exactly is *so* time consuming, and still makes good
    > use of an IDE/USB drive setup.
    >
    >
    >
     
    Dshai, Feb 22, 2007
    #15
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