OS Test Monday(11-24-2003)

Discussion in 'A+ Certification' started by H H, Nov 22, 2003.

  1. H H

    H H Guest

    Hi all!
    Im getting ready to take my A+OS test this Monday. I've used Mike Meyers A+
    Passport book extensively and it, along with the exams on freecomptia.com,
    helped me pass A+ Hardware.
    I'm passing the freecomptia test with a minimum of 88% now.

    Any last minutes tips? I know the test changed to a linear format, so that's
    something different.
    Anything else I should look out for?
    Thanks for any help!
     
    H H, Nov 22, 2003
    #1
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  2. H H

    Jinkies Guest

    In article <CaRvb.4890$>,
    says...
    >
    >Hi all!
    >Im getting ready to take my A+OS test this Monday. I've used Mike Meyers A+
    >Passport book extensively and it, along with the exams on freecomptia.com,
    >helped me pass A+ Hardware.
    >I'm passing the freecomptia test with a minimum of 88% now.
    >


    That is not great, freecomptia's tests are easier than the real exam. You'd
    probably bomb a Transcender. Freecomptia's hardware exams contain more
    accurate braindumps than the OS ones. For OS I would go to Braindumpcentral

    >Any last minutes tips? I know the test changed to a linear format, so that's
    >something different.


    Linear format increases your odds of passing considerably. People who failed
    during the adaptive experiments have a legitimate beef, though I don't suspect
    CompTIA will be offering refunds. However, if adaptive had been a better
    technology they would've stuck with it. They didn't, which is probably enough
    evidence to enable a person who failed the adaptive exam to recover the cost in
    small claims court, though I doubt anyone will bother.

    >Anything else I should look out for?
    >Thanks for any help!


    Stick with braindumps, I read Sybex's huge book cover to cover TWICE and still
    failed the adaptive OS exam. Even the first time I read it I was constantly
    thinking to myself "tell me something I don't already know!". I did learn some
    stuff from it, but not much, and it didn't help me pass the exam at all. I
    don't know why I can't readily retreive information from my mind to excell in
    test environments, but I can't. I tend to do great on essay questions, but A+
    didn't include any! Critical thinking skills and boning up on logic has helped
    me score higher on multiple-choice exams, but I firmly believe memorization is
    the only way to pass anything but the simplest multiple-choice exams.

    One thing I found interesting is the 'flashcards' included on the Sybex CD.
    These are presented like the old 'Match Game', or 'Five Questions' on the Craig
    Kilborn show. You're asked a question and required to fill in the blank.
    However, determining what word they're looking for from the ambiguous question
    is difficult. With technical material, questions that effectively prompt for
    an answer tend to give away the answer in the question - they're too easy. So
    'tough' questions have to be worded somewhat ambiguously, and
    ultimately what occurs is a gamesmanship of rationalization between the test
    designer and the test taker. Becaause the material we're expected to learn for
    A+ is technical material, the A+ test has no interested in testing a deeper
    understanding of the physics behind computers. Large books like Mike Meyers
    and Sybex try to give a little background because they know a tech in the field
    who simply memorizes A+ material isn't nearly as useful as a tech who
    understands the fundementals. But these books also point out immediately that
    these are not objectives of the test. I tend to dive into fields of academia
    to learn something, not to acheive certifications. Learning and acheiving a
    certification are different goals that are not always completely compatible.
    If you want to acheive both, you have to approach the two goals seperately.
    Effective students realize that surpassing the prof's knowledge doesn't give
    them good grades - stick with the curriculum. Memorize what is expected of you
    if you want the grades, it's simple carrot and stick behavioral modification.
    But if you really want to learn, you'll be operating under a different, richer,
    internal motivation that wont always be compatible with the practical 'carrot
    and stick' material world.
     
    Jinkies, Nov 23, 2003
    #2
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  3. H H

    Jinkies Guest

    In article <MFTvb.126930$jy.118518@clgrps13>, says...
    >
    >One thing I found interesting is the 'flashcards' included on the Sybex CD.
    >These are presented like the old 'Match Game', or 'Five Questions' on the

    Craig
    >Kilborn show. You're asked a question and required to fill in the blank.
    >However, determining what word they're looking for from the ambiguous question
    >is difficult. With technical material, questions that effectively prompt for
    >an answer tend to give away the answer in the question - they're too easy. So
    >'tough' questions have to be worded somewhat ambiguously, and
    >ultimately what occurs is a gamesmanship of rationalization between the test
    >designer and the test taker.


    Err, forgot to mention why I found this interesting! I found it interesting
    because the Sybex flashcards introduced the same material as the practice exams
    but the flashcards reveal the futility of the exersize because they don't
    provide the multiple-choice answers. By taking away the multiple choice
    answers, its much easier to see whether the question makes sense, and much of
    the time the questions don't make much sense once the multiple-choice options
    are removed.

    In keeping with the spirit of Merriam-webster, I'd say exams like A+ and MCSE
    are 'McCertifications'. They're a one-size-fits-all, get-em-in-and-get-em-out
    kind of thing. I'm not knocking them because technicians who know a little bit
    more than the average user are required in large numbers in the workforce these
    days. It's a good certification. I wouldn't call it a 'starting point' as
    some like to, though.
     
    Jinkies, Nov 23, 2003
    #3
  4. H H

    H H Guest

    Thanks for the info!

    What would you call a starting point? I've been a technician for 18 years,
    so I have the experience but not the certfication. It seems to me that
    networking and Linux is/are the next "big thing"...


    "Jinkies" <> wrote in message
    news:F6Uvb.18005$IZ1.2205@edtnps84...
    > In article <MFTvb.126930$jy.118518@clgrps13>, says...
    > >
    > >One thing I found interesting is the 'flashcards' included on the Sybex

    CD.
    > >These are presented like the old 'Match Game', or 'Five Questions' on the

    > Craig
    > >Kilborn show. You're asked a question and required to fill in the blank.
    > >However, determining what word they're looking for from the ambiguous

    question
    > >is difficult. With technical material, questions that effectively prompt

    for
    > >an answer tend to give away the answer in the question - they're too

    easy. So
    > >'tough' questions have to be worded somewhat ambiguously, and
    > >ultimately what occurs is a gamesmanship of rationalization between the

    test
    > >designer and the test taker.

    >
    > Err, forgot to mention why I found this interesting! I found it

    interesting
    > because the Sybex flashcards introduced the same material as the practice

    exams
    > but the flashcards reveal the futility of the exersize because they don't
    > provide the multiple-choice answers. By taking away the multiple choice
    > answers, its much easier to see whether the question makes sense, and much

    of
    > the time the questions don't make much sense once the multiple-choice

    options
    > are removed.
    >
    > In keeping with the spirit of Merriam-webster, I'd say exams like A+ and

    MCSE
    > are 'McCertifications'. They're a one-size-fits-all,

    get-em-in-and-get-em-out
    > kind of thing. I'm not knocking them because technicians who know a

    little bit
    > more than the average user are required in large numbers in the workforce

    these
    > days. It's a good certification. I wouldn't call it a 'starting point'

    as
    > some like to, though.
    >
     
    H H, Nov 23, 2003
    #4
  5. H H

    Jinkies Guest

    In article <6lUvb.4923$>,
    says...
    >
    >Thanks for the info!
    >
    >What would you call a starting point? I've been a technician for 18 years,
    >so I have the experience but not the certfication. It seems to me that
    >networking and Linux is/are the next "big thing"...
    >


    I'd say a starting point was where you were 18 years ago. I have no idea why
    you felt you needed certification. Most people who are successful without
    jumping through the hoops don't go back to jump through the hoops for kicks.
    Celebrities are given 'honorary' degrees for doing nothing but being popular.
    The degrees are meaningless tokens the celebrities will never use practically
    anyway.

    One reason I decided to get A+ certified is because it is difficult to prove to
    a client that I have this skill otherwise. I have designed webpages, so if a
    client needs a webpage to be designed, I can simply direct him to the url of a
    site I had designed. Even if I were a sysadmin, I might be able to point
    towards networks I maintained. But when it comes to fixing individual's
    computers, aside from a few letters of recommendation, it is difficult to
    immediately demonstrate my ability.


    >
    >"Jinkies" <> wrote in message
    >news:F6Uvb.18005$IZ1.2205@edtnps84...
    >> In article <MFTvb.126930$jy.118518@clgrps13>, says...
    >> >
    >> >One thing I found interesting is the 'flashcards' included on the Sybex

    >CD.
    >> >These are presented like the old 'Match Game', or 'Five Questions' on the

    >> Craig
    >> >Kilborn show. You're asked a question and required to fill in the blank.
    >> >However, determining what word they're looking for from the ambiguous

    >question
    >> >is difficult. With technical material, questions that effectively prompt

    >for
    >> >an answer tend to give away the answer in the question - they're too

    >easy. So
    >> >'tough' questions have to be worded somewhat ambiguously, and
    >> >ultimately what occurs is a gamesmanship of rationalization between the

    >test
    >> >designer and the test taker.

    >>
    >> Err, forgot to mention why I found this interesting! I found it

    >interesting
    >> because the Sybex flashcards introduced the same material as the practice

    >exams
    >> but the flashcards reveal the futility of the exersize because they don't
    >> provide the multiple-choice answers. By taking away the multiple choice
    >> answers, its much easier to see whether the question makes sense, and much

    >of
    >> the time the questions don't make much sense once the multiple-choice

    >options
    >> are removed.
    >>
    >> In keeping with the spirit of Merriam-webster, I'd say exams like A+ and

    >MCSE
    >> are 'McCertifications'. They're a one-size-fits-all,

    >get-em-in-and-get-em-out
    >> kind of thing. I'm not knocking them because technicians who know a

    >little bit
    >> more than the average user are required in large numbers in the workforce

    >these
    >> days. It's a good certification. I wouldn't call it a 'starting point'

    >as
    >> some like to, though.
    >>

    >
    >
     
    Jinkies, Nov 23, 2003
    #5
  6. H H

    H H Guest

    10 years ago, it was enough to say you had "experience". It isn't that way
    anymore.
    You need proof, just like you say.

    "Jinkies" <> wrote in message
    news:8lVvb.128632$jy.94729@clgrps13...
    > In article <6lUvb.4923$>,
    > says...
    > >
    > >Thanks for the info!
    > >
    > >What would you call a starting point? I've been a technician for 18

    years,
    > >so I have the experience but not the certfication. It seems to me that
    > >networking and Linux is/are the next "big thing"...
    > >

    >
    > I'd say a starting point was where you were 18 years ago. I have no idea

    why
    > you felt you needed certification. Most people who are successful without
    > jumping through the hoops don't go back to jump through the hoops for

    kicks.
    > Celebrities are given 'honorary' degrees for doing nothing but being

    popular.
    > The degrees are meaningless tokens the celebrities will never use

    practically
    > anyway.
    >
    > One reason I decided to get A+ certified is because it is difficult to

    prove to
    > a client that I have this skill otherwise. I have designed webpages, so

    if a
    > client needs a webpage to be designed, I can simply direct him to the url

    of a
    > site I had designed. Even if I were a sysadmin, I might be able to point
    > towards networks I maintained. But when it comes to fixing individual's
    > computers, aside from a few letters of recommendation, it is difficult to
    > immediately demonstrate my ability.
    >
    >
    > >
    > >"Jinkies" <> wrote in message
    > >news:F6Uvb.18005$IZ1.2205@edtnps84...
    > >> In article <MFTvb.126930$jy.118518@clgrps13>, says...
    > >> >
    > >> >One thing I found interesting is the 'flashcards' included on the

    Sybex
    > >CD.
    > >> >These are presented like the old 'Match Game', or 'Five Questions' on

    the
    > >> Craig
    > >> >Kilborn show. You're asked a question and required to fill in the

    blank.
    > >> >However, determining what word they're looking for from the ambiguous

    > >question
    > >> >is difficult. With technical material, questions that effectively

    prompt
    > >for
    > >> >an answer tend to give away the answer in the question - they're too

    > >easy. So
    > >> >'tough' questions have to be worded somewhat ambiguously, and
    > >> >ultimately what occurs is a gamesmanship of rationalization between

    the
    > >test
    > >> >designer and the test taker.
    > >>
    > >> Err, forgot to mention why I found this interesting! I found it

    > >interesting
    > >> because the Sybex flashcards introduced the same material as the

    practice
    > >exams
    > >> but the flashcards reveal the futility of the exersize because they

    don't
    > >> provide the multiple-choice answers. By taking away the multiple

    choice
    > >> answers, its much easier to see whether the question makes sense, and

    much
    > >of
    > >> the time the questions don't make much sense once the multiple-choice

    > >options
    > >> are removed.
    > >>
    > >> In keeping with the spirit of Merriam-webster, I'd say exams like A+

    and
    > >MCSE
    > >> are 'McCertifications'. They're a one-size-fits-all,

    > >get-em-in-and-get-em-out
    > >> kind of thing. I'm not knocking them because technicians who know a

    > >little bit
    > >> more than the average user are required in large numbers in the

    workforce
    > >these
    > >> days. It's a good certification. I wouldn't call it a 'starting

    point'
    > >as
    > >> some like to, though.
    > >>

    > >
    > >

    >
     
    H H, Nov 24, 2003
    #6
  7. H H

    H H Guest

    So I did, and I passed! I got a 673. Now considering that isn't a "great"
    score you have to take into account how many WinXP questions there were.
    I counted 15 questions on XP. Quite alot in my opinion for a test that isn't
    supposed to cover it, and I didn't study it that much.


    "AT" <torgny@@direcway.com> wrote in message
    news:JOjwb.13159$...
    > With that experience I would say: Just go take the test and have it done!
    >
    > AT
    >
    > "H H" <> wrote in message
    > news:6lUvb.4923$...
    > > Thanks for the info!
    > >
    > > What would you call a starting point? I've been a technician for 18

    years,
    > > so I have the experience but not the certfication. It seems to me that
    > > networking and Linux is/are the next "big thing"...
    > >
    > >
    > > "Jinkies" <> wrote in message
    > > news:F6Uvb.18005$IZ1.2205@edtnps84...
    > > > In article <MFTvb.126930$jy.118518@clgrps13>,

    says...
    > > > >
    > > > >One thing I found interesting is the 'flashcards' included on the

    Sybex
    > > CD.
    > > > >These are presented like the old 'Match Game', or 'Five Questions' on

    > the
    > > > Craig
    > > > >Kilborn show. You're asked a question and required to fill in the

    > blank.
    > > > >However, determining what word they're looking for from the ambiguous

    > > question
    > > > >is difficult. With technical material, questions that effectively

    > prompt
    > > for
    > > > >an answer tend to give away the answer in the question - they're too

    > > easy. So
    > > > >'tough' questions have to be worded somewhat ambiguously, and
    > > > >ultimately what occurs is a gamesmanship of rationalization between

    the
    > > test
    > > > >designer and the test taker.
    > > >
    > > > Err, forgot to mention why I found this interesting! I found it

    > > interesting
    > > > because the Sybex flashcards introduced the same material as the

    > practice
    > > exams
    > > > but the flashcards reveal the futility of the exersize because they

    > don't
    > > > provide the multiple-choice answers. By taking away the multiple

    choice
    > > > answers, its much easier to see whether the question makes sense, and

    > much
    > > of
    > > > the time the questions don't make much sense once the multiple-choice

    > > options
    > > > are removed.
    > > >
    > > > In keeping with the spirit of Merriam-webster, I'd say exams like A+

    and
    > > MCSE
    > > > are 'McCertifications'. They're a one-size-fits-all,

    > > get-em-in-and-get-em-out
    > > > kind of thing. I'm not knocking them because technicians who know a

    > > little bit
    > > > more than the average user are required in large numbers in the

    > workforce
    > > these
    > > > days. It's a good certification. I wouldn't call it a 'starting

    point'
    > > as
    > > > some like to, though.
    > > >

    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
    H H, Nov 24, 2003
    #7
  8. H H

    H H Guest

    I passed! I got a 673. Now considering that isn't a "great" score you have
    to take into account how many WinXP questions there were.I counted 15
    questions on XP. Quite alot in my opinion for a test that isn't
    supposed to cover it, and I didn't study it that much.

    "Paisleyskye" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Best of luck on your test!
    > --
    > Paisleyskye
    > http://www.icertify.net
    >
    > "H H" <> wrote in message
    > news:CaRvb.4890$...
    > > Hi all!
    > > Im getting ready to take my A+OS test this Monday. I've used Mike Meyers

    > A+
    > > Passport book extensively and it, along with the exams on

    freecomptia.com,
    > > helped me pass A+ Hardware.
    > > I'm passing the freecomptia test with a minimum of 88% now.
    > >
    > > Any last minutes tips? I know the test changed to a linear format, so

    > that's
    > > something different.
    > > Anything else I should look out for?
    > > Thanks for any help!
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
    H H, Nov 24, 2003
    #8
  9. H H

    Jinkies Guest

    In article <>, says...
    >
    >
    >"Jinkies" <> wrote in message
    >news:MFTvb.126930$jy.118518@clgrps13...
    >> In article <CaRvb.4890$>,
    >> says...
    >> People who failed
    >> during the adaptive experiments have a legitimate beef, though I don't

    >suspect
    >> CompTIA will be offering refunds. However, if adaptive had been a better
    >> technology they would've stuck with it. They didn't, which is probably

    >enough
    >> evidence to enable a person who failed the adaptive exam to recover the

    >cost in
    >> small claims court, though I doubt anyone will bother.

    >
    >
    >No they don't. Anyone who failed simply didn't take the time to prepare,
    >and all the preparation that's needed is MM All-In-One.
    >
    >The format change does two things, one it better enables the 'beta' testing
    >of new material, and two allows a more through test of knowledge. The
    >biggest complaint about adaptive is how EASY it was, not the other way
    >round.
    >


    It doesn't matter what the 'biggest complaint' is, what matters is that
    adaptive testing is a pseudoscience with no rigor. Adaptive testing is simply
    cheaper to administer, and the companies who use it use it for that reason.



    >
     
    Jinkies, Nov 25, 2003
    #9
  10. H H

    Jinkies Guest

    In article <iHtwb.5276$>,
    says...
    >
    >So I did, and I passed! I got a 673. Now considering that isn't a "great"
    >score you have to take into account how many WinXP questions there were.
    >I counted 15 questions on XP. Quite alot in my opinion for a test that isn't
    >supposed to cover it, and I didn't study it that much.
    >
    >


    The XP questions are not being scored yet. Your score of 673 accurately
    reflects what I would predict based on the 88% average you were getting on
    FreeComptia's practice exams. You were lucky to squeak by, but congrats!
     
    Jinkies, Nov 25, 2003
    #10
  11. H H

    Jinkies Guest

    In article <>, says...
    >


    >
    >Failed reading comprehension eh? Let me explain it to you carefully this
    >time:
    >
    >>People who failed
    > >during the adaptive experiments have a legitimate beef, though I don't
    >> >suspect CompTIA will be offering refunds.

    >
    >
    >NO - people who failed have NO "legimate beef". People who failed need to
    >take responsibility for their own failure rather than blame the technology.
    >


    Define 'responsibility' in the context you're trying to use the word. Your
    arguement is based on whats known as fallacy of equivocation: shifting the
    meaning of a key expression in an argument. Responsibility implies choice. A
    person who fails an exam has no choice but to accept that he failed. If he
    wants to pass, he has no choice but to re-test. My claim was that a person who
    failed because of a substandard technology has a valid claim for a refund - my
    claim was NOT that a person who failed the test should be given access to a
    mechanism to dispute the grade. So if you want to talk about responsibility,
    it is CompTIA's responsibility to make sure that the product they are selling
    matches what they're advertising. The very nature of adaptive testing brings
    that into question.


    >>However, if adaptive had been a better
    >> technology they would've stuck with it.

    >
    >Bullshit. Then fact that they didn't stick with has no bearing on the
    >quality of the technology.


    On what basis do you make this claim?

    >This is purely an assumption on your part.
    >


    And your 'no bearing' claim is also purely an assumption. An assumption can be
    bullshit, but is not necessarily. You have failed to demonstrate how my claim
    is bullshit, you've simply declared it to be bullshit.

    >>They didn't, which is probably
    >> enough
    >> evidence to enable a person who failed the adaptive exam to recover the
    >> cost in
    >> small claims court, though I doubt anyone will bother.
    >>

    >
    >No, it isn't evidence at all.


    Yes it is. You've decided it is not compelling evidence, but you've provided
    little in the way of sound reasoning behind arriving at that decision.
     
    Jinkies, Nov 25, 2003
    #11
  12. H H

    Jinkies Guest

    In article <>, says...
    >
    >
    >"Jinkies" <> wrote in message
    >news:l1Pwb.160232$jy.18949@clgrps13...
    >> In article <>, says...
    >> >

    >>
    >> >
    >> >Failed reading comprehension eh? Let me explain it to you carefully this
    >> >time:
    >> >
    >> >>People who failed
    >> > >during the adaptive experiments have a legitimate beef, though I don't
    >> >> >suspect CompTIA will be offering refunds.
    >> >
    >> >
    >> >NO - people who failed have NO "legimate beef". People who failed need to
    >> >take responsibility for their own failure rather than blame the

    >technology.
    >> >

    >>

    >
    >You failed the test. Get over it. All your bull shit stems from your own
    >inability to accept your failure.
    >
    >


    I passed the linear exam and I am a Certified CompTIA A+ Technician just like
    you are. Making up falsehoods wont win you any arguements.
     
    Jinkies, Nov 25, 2003
    #12
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