OS loading order

Discussion in 'Windows 64bit' started by Kue2, May 24, 2009.

  1. Kue2

    Kue2 Guest

    One hard drive Partitioned, Partition 1 & Partition 2.
    Two OS's to load WinXP64 & Windows 7-32bit.
    Which Os do I load first? Does it matter which Partition I use?

    Thanks
     
    Kue2, May 24, 2009
    #1
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  2. Kue2

    Kue2 Guest

    Not loading Vista loading Win7 - 32 RC build 7100

    "Jawade" <> wrote in message
    news:090524$...
    > Op Zondag 24 Mei 2009 13:57:05 -0400, schreef Kue2 <> in
    > artikel <>:
    >> One hard drive Partitioned, Partition 1 & Partition 2.
    >> Two OS's to load WinXP64 & Windows 7-32bit.
    >> Which Os do I load first? Does it matter which Partition I use?

    >
    > Always the oldest first. The partition doesnt matter. Maybe Vista on
    > the first.
    >
    > --
    > Met vriendelijke groeten, Jawade. Kolibrie Software Tools:
    > http://jawade.nl/ 1 april: HexEditor, Diskeditors met MBR-rebuilders!
    > Bootmanager (+Vista +Linux +Engels), ClrMBR, SDir(DIRsize), POP3lezer,
    > Console-filebrowser, Kalender, Webtellers en IP-log, USB-stick tester.
     
    Kue2, May 24, 2009
    #2
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  3. Kue2

    R. C. White Guest

    Hi, Kue2.

    > Not loading Vista loading Win7 - 32 RC build 7100


    But the rule still applies!

    The Golden Rule of dual-booting is to ALWAYS install the NEWEST operating
    system LAST!

    We usually hear it as Jawade said: oldest first. But the important point
    is to install the newest last. If there are only two, then it's the same
    thing, but if you are installing 3 or more OSes, it might not matter which
    comes first, so long as you finish with the latest.

    The Win7 Setup.exe knows exactly how to deal with any Win2K, WinXP or
    Vista - or earlier Win7 - installations that it finds (and, yes, it will
    look for them). But WinXP Setup hasn't the foggiest idea of what to do
    about either Vista or Win7, neither of which even existed when that version
    of Setup.exe was written back in 2001.

    One other fine point: Put the OS that is most likely to be abandoned some
    day on the "other" partition. That way, when you decide to go Win7 all the
    way, it will be easy to delete the partition where WinXP is installed if
    that is not also your "System Partition" that is used to boot the computer.

    If it were my system and I were starting fresh with a new hard drive, I'd
    repartition it before I start. Make the first partition quite small - maybe
    as small as 1 GB - and mark it Active (bootable). Then make the other two
    partitions for the two operating systems. Then install WinXP to the third
    partition; it will write its few startup files (NTLDR, NTDETECT.COM and
    Boot.ini) to the first partition and then put its \Windows folder tree with
    all those other files into that third partition. Finally, install Win7 to
    the second partition; it will put its own few startup files (bootmgr and the
    hidden \Boot folder) into the first partition - preserving NTLDR, etc., to
    be used in dual-booting into WinXP - and then put all those other GBs of
    files into the \Windows folder on the second partition.

    RC
    --
    R. C. White, CPA
    San Marcos, TX

    Microsoft Windows MVP
    Windows Live Mail 2009 (14.0.8064.0206) in Win7 Ultimate x64 RC 7100

    "Kue2" <> wrote in message
    news:D...
    > Not loading Vista loading Win7 - 32 RC build 7100
    >
    > "Jawade" <> wrote in message
    > news:090524$...
    >> Op Zondag 24 Mei 2009 13:57:05 -0400, schreef Kue2 <> in
    >> artikel <>:
    >>> One hard drive Partitioned, Partition 1 & Partition 2.
    >>> Two OS's to load WinXP64 & Windows 7-32bit.
    >>> Which Os do I load first? Does it matter which Partition I use?

    >>
    >> Always the oldest first. The partition doesnt matter. Maybe Vista on
    >> the first.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Met vriendelijke groeten, Jawade. Kolibrie Software Tools:
    >> http://jawade.nl/ 1 april: HexEditor, Diskeditors met MBR-rebuilders!
    >> Bootmanager (+Vista +Linux +Engels), ClrMBR, SDir(DIRsize), POP3lezer,
    >> Console-filebrowser, Kalender, Webtellers en IP-log, USB-stick tester.
     
    R. C. White, May 24, 2009
    #3
  4. Kue2

    Kue2 Guest

    R.C. White

    Thank you very much, your explanation is excellent. The tip about the 1GB
    partition first is excellent.
    Nice to have someone so knowledgeable in this newsgroup.
    I will save your email for further reference.

    "R. C. White" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi, Kue2.
    >
    >> Not loading Vista loading Win7 - 32 RC build 7100

    >
    > But the rule still applies!
    >
    > The Golden Rule of dual-booting is to ALWAYS install the NEWEST operating
    > system LAST!
    >
    > We usually hear it as Jawade said: oldest first. But the important point
    > is to install the newest last. If there are only two, then it's the same
    > thing, but if you are installing 3 or more OSes, it might not matter which
    > comes first, so long as you finish with the latest.
    >
    > The Win7 Setup.exe knows exactly how to deal with any Win2K, WinXP or
    > Vista - or earlier Win7 - installations that it finds (and, yes, it will
    > look for them). But WinXP Setup hasn't the foggiest idea of what to do
    > about either Vista or Win7, neither of which even existed when that
    > version of Setup.exe was written back in 2001.
    >
    > One other fine point: Put the OS that is most likely to be abandoned some
    > day on the "other" partition. That way, when you decide to go Win7 all
    > the way, it will be easy to delete the partition where WinXP is installed
    > if that is not also your "System Partition" that is used to boot the
    > computer.
    >
    > If it were my system and I were starting fresh with a new hard drive, I'd
    > repartition it before I start. Make the first partition quite small -
    > maybe as small as 1 GB - and mark it Active (bootable). Then make the
    > other two partitions for the two operating systems. Then install WinXP to
    > the third partition; it will write its few startup files (NTLDR,
    > NTDETECT.COM and Boot.ini) to the first partition and then put its
    > \Windows folder tree with all those other files into that third partition.
    > Finally, install Win7 to the second partition; it will put its own few
    > startup files (bootmgr and the hidden \Boot folder) into the first
    > partition - preserving NTLDR, etc., to be used in dual-booting into
    > WinXP - and then put all those other GBs of files into the \Windows folder
    > on the second partition.
    >
    > RC
    > --
    > R. C. White, CPA
    > San Marcos, TX
    >
    > Microsoft Windows MVP
    > Windows Live Mail 2009 (14.0.8064.0206) in Win7 Ultimate x64 RC 7100
    >
    > "Kue2" <> wrote in message
    > news:D...
    >> Not loading Vista loading Win7 - 32 RC build 7100
    >>
    >> "Jawade" <> wrote in message
    >> news:090524$...
    >>> Op Zondag 24 Mei 2009 13:57:05 -0400, schreef Kue2 <> in
    >>> artikel <>:
    >>>> One hard drive Partitioned, Partition 1 & Partition 2.
    >>>> Two OS's to load WinXP64 & Windows 7-32bit.
    >>>> Which Os do I load first? Does it matter which Partition I use?
    >>>
    >>> Always the oldest first. The partition doesnt matter. Maybe Vista on
    >>> the first.
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> Met vriendelijke groeten, Jawade. Kolibrie Software Tools:
    >>> http://jawade.nl/ 1 april: HexEditor, Diskeditors met MBR-rebuilders!
    >>> Bootmanager (+Vista +Linux +Engels), ClrMBR, SDir(DIRsize), POP3lezer,
    >>> Console-filebrowser, Kalender, Webtellers en IP-log, USB-stick tester.

    >
     
    Kue2, May 24, 2009
    #4
  5. What about partition alignment? I have recently read multiple posts and
    articles about Win 7 automatically aligning partitions for better
    performance. Most of the articles point out that Vista also aligns
    partitions but it wasn't a hot subject last year.

    I'm still trying to find Paul Harvey's "rest of the story" on partition
    alignment. And, yes, I know it was previously thought to only be
    applicable to RAID, but as I said before, it seems to be the current 'in
    thing' for all hard drives.

    I am really curious about the whole alignment idea.



    R. C. White wrote:
    > Hi, Kue2.
    >
    >> Not loading Vista loading Win7 - 32 RC build 7100

    >
    > But the rule still applies!
    >
    > The Golden Rule of dual-booting is to ALWAYS install the NEWEST
    > operating system LAST!
    >
    > We usually hear it as Jawade said: oldest first. But the important
    > point is to install the newest last. If there are only two, then it's
    > the same thing, but if you are installing 3 or more OSes, it might not
    > matter which comes first, so long as you finish with the latest.
    >
    > The Win7 Setup.exe knows exactly how to deal with any Win2K, WinXP or
    > Vista - or earlier Win7 - installations that it finds (and, yes, it will
    > look for them). But WinXP Setup hasn't the foggiest idea of what to do
    > about either Vista or Win7, neither of which even existed when that
    > version of Setup.exe was written back in 2001.
    >
    > One other fine point: Put the OS that is most likely to be abandoned
    > some day on the "other" partition. That way, when you decide to go Win7
    > all the way, it will be easy to delete the partition where WinXP is
    > installed if that is not also your "System Partition" that is used to
    > boot the computer.
    >
    > If it were my system and I were starting fresh with a new hard drive,
    > I'd repartition it before I start. Make the first partition quite small
    > - maybe as small as 1 GB - and mark it Active (bootable). Then make the
    > other two partitions for the two operating systems. Then install WinXP
    > to the third partition; it will write its few startup files (NTLDR,
    > NTDETECT.COM and Boot.ini) to the first partition and then put its
    > \Windows folder tree with all those other files into that third
    > partition. Finally, install Win7 to the second partition; it will put
    > its own few startup files (bootmgr and the hidden \Boot folder) into the
    > first partition - preserving NTLDR, etc., to be used in dual-booting
    > into WinXP - and then put all those other GBs of files into the \Windows
    > folder on the second partition.
    >
    > RC
     
    Bobby Johnson, May 24, 2009
    #5
  6. Kue2

    Kue2 Guest

    Hi Bobby
    Yes, sounds very interesting. I was not aware of partitioning aligning in
    Vista or in Win7. Maybe someone that is familiar with it
    will explain it in more detail.

    "Bobby Johnson" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > What about partition alignment? I have recently read multiple posts and
    > articles about Win 7 automatically aligning partitions for better
    > performance. Most of the articles point out that Vista also aligns
    > partitions but it wasn't a hot subject last year.
    >
    > I'm still trying to find Paul Harvey's "rest of the story" on partition
    > alignment. And, yes, I know it was previously thought to only be
    > applicable to RAID, but as I said before, it seems to be the current 'in
    > thing' for all hard drives.
    >
    > I am really curious about the whole alignment idea.
    >
    >
    >
    > R. C. White wrote:
    >> Hi, Kue2.
    >>
    >>> Not loading Vista loading Win7 - 32 RC build 7100

    >>
    >> But the rule still applies!
    >>
    >> The Golden Rule of dual-booting is to ALWAYS install the NEWEST operating
    >> system LAST!
    >>
    >> We usually hear it as Jawade said: oldest first. But the important
    >> point is to install the newest last. If there are only two, then it's
    >> the same thing, but if you are installing 3 or more OSes, it might not
    >> matter which comes first, so long as you finish with the latest.
    >>
    >> The Win7 Setup.exe knows exactly how to deal with any Win2K, WinXP or
    >> Vista - or earlier Win7 - installations that it finds (and, yes, it will
    >> look for them). But WinXP Setup hasn't the foggiest idea of what to do
    >> about either Vista or Win7, neither of which even existed when that
    >> version of Setup.exe was written back in 2001.
    >>
    >> One other fine point: Put the OS that is most likely to be abandoned
    >> some day on the "other" partition. That way, when you decide to go Win7
    >> all the way, it will be easy to delete the partition where WinXP is
    >> installed if that is not also your "System Partition" that is used to
    >> boot the computer.
    >>
    >> If it were my system and I were starting fresh with a new hard drive, I'd
    >> repartition it before I start. Make the first partition quite small -
    >> maybe as small as 1 GB - and mark it Active (bootable). Then make the
    >> other two partitions for the two operating systems. Then install WinXP
    >> to the third partition; it will write its few startup files (NTLDR,
    >> NTDETECT.COM and Boot.ini) to the first partition and then put its
    >> \Windows folder tree with all those other files into that third
    >> partition. Finally, install Win7 to the second partition; it will put
    >> its own few startup files (bootmgr and the hidden \Boot folder) into the
    >> first partition - preserving NTLDR, etc., to be used in dual-booting into
    >> WinXP - and then put all those other GBs of files into the \Windows
    >> folder on the second partition.
    >>
    >> RC
     
    Kue2, May 26, 2009
    #6
  7. Partition Alignment

    I first ran across the information the OZC SSD Forum. After seeing it
    there I checked the hard drives I had used for Vist and for Win 7 with a
    relatively old Microsoft utility called 'diskpar' which dates back to
    Win 2000 and the difference was significant. Diskpar was used with Win
    2000 to align partitions for RAID use, but starting with Vista all hard
    drive partitions are aligned.

    From what I have found on the subject aligning the partitions is
    supposed to improve overall disk performance. Partitions made with XP
    and prior would have 63 hidden sectors with the partition starting on
    sector 64. Supposedly when the disk is accessed with 4096 clusters this
    forces data to be read or written in 2 steps. Where as if the partition
    is aligned to a multiple of 4096, 32KB being the minimum, the access is
    completed in 1 step. OCZ found that XP's alignment was the cause of
    stutter with SSDs. I currently have SSDs in a Dell 1501 and an Eee PC
    1000HE both with Win 7 x86 and it's great. Boot time is less than 30
    seconds after POST is complete.

    If you look at a drive that Win 7 has partitioned there are 2048 hidden
    sectors for a starting offset of 1,048,576. Also with Win 7 it creates
    a 100MB system partition where most of the system files needed for
    booting are placed. This partition is hidden in Win 7.

    So Vista and Win 7 should always do the partitioning during installation
    for optimum hard drive configuration and performance.


    Kue2 wrote:
    > Hi Bobby
    > Yes, sounds very interesting. I was not aware of partitioning aligning
    > in Vista or in Win7. Maybe someone that is familiar with it
    > will explain it in more detail.
    >
    > "Bobby Johnson" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> What about partition alignment? I have recently read multiple posts
    >> and articles about Win 7 automatically aligning partitions for better
    >> performance. Most of the articles point out that Vista also aligns
    >> partitions but it wasn't a hot subject last year.
    >>
    >> I'm still trying to find Paul Harvey's "rest of the story" on
    >> partition alignment. And, yes, I know it was previously thought to
    >> only be applicable to RAID, but as I said before, it seems to be the
    >> current 'in thing' for all hard drives.
    >>
    >> I am really curious about the whole alignment idea.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> R. C. White wrote:
    >>> Hi, Kue2.
    >>>
    >>>> Not loading Vista loading Win7 - 32 RC build 7100
    >>>
    >>> But the rule still applies!
    >>>
    >>> The Golden Rule of dual-booting is to ALWAYS install the NEWEST
    >>> operating system LAST!
    >>>
    >>> We usually hear it as Jawade said: oldest first. But the important
    >>> point is to install the newest last. If there are only two, then
    >>> it's the same thing, but if you are installing 3 or more OSes, it
    >>> might not matter which comes first, so long as you finish with the
    >>> latest.
    >>>
    >>> The Win7 Setup.exe knows exactly how to deal with any Win2K, WinXP or
    >>> Vista - or earlier Win7 - installations that it finds (and, yes, it
    >>> will look for them). But WinXP Setup hasn't the foggiest idea of
    >>> what to do about either Vista or Win7, neither of which even existed
    >>> when that version of Setup.exe was written back in 2001.
    >>>
    >>> One other fine point: Put the OS that is most likely to be abandoned
    >>> some day on the "other" partition. That way, when you decide to go
    >>> Win7 all the way, it will be easy to delete the partition where WinXP
    >>> is installed if that is not also your "System Partition" that is used
    >>> to boot the computer.
    >>>
    >>> If it were my system and I were starting fresh with a new hard drive,
    >>> I'd repartition it before I start. Make the first partition quite
    >>> small - maybe as small as 1 GB - and mark it Active (bootable). Then
    >>> make the other two partitions for the two operating systems. Then
    >>> install WinXP to the third partition; it will write its few startup
    >>> files (NTLDR, NTDETECT.COM and Boot.ini) to the first partition and
    >>> then put its \Windows folder tree with all those other files into
    >>> that third partition. Finally, install Win7 to the second partition;
    >>> it will put its own few startup files (bootmgr and the hidden \Boot
    >>> folder) into the first partition - preserving NTLDR, etc., to be used
    >>> in dual-booting into WinXP - and then put all those other GBs of
    >>> files into the \Windows folder on the second partition.
    >>>
    >>> RC

    >
     
    Bobby Johnson, May 26, 2009
    #7
  8. In Windows 7 or Vista, it's a GPT partition, and aligned at 1MB. Next, you
    have a 100MB reserved partition, then the "first" partition starts at 101MB.
    You can use diskpart to verify.







    "Kue2" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi Bobby
    > Yes, sounds very interesting. I was not aware of partitioning aligning in
    > Vista or in Win7. Maybe someone that is familiar with it
    > will explain it in more detail.
    >
    > "Bobby Johnson" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> What about partition alignment? I have recently read multiple posts and
    >> articles about Win 7 automatically aligning partitions for better
    >> performance. Most of the articles point out that Vista also aligns
    >> partitions but it wasn't a hot subject last year.
    >>
    >> I'm still trying to find Paul Harvey's "rest of the story" on partition
    >> alignment. And, yes, I know it was previously thought to only be
    >> applicable to RAID, but as I said before, it seems to be the current 'in
    >> thing' for all hard drives.
    >>
    >> I am really curious about the whole alignment idea.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> R. C. White wrote:
    >>> Hi, Kue2.
    >>>
    >>>> Not loading Vista loading Win7 - 32 RC build 7100
    >>>
    >>> But the rule still applies!
    >>>
    >>> The Golden Rule of dual-booting is to ALWAYS install the NEWEST
    >>> operating system LAST!
    >>>
    >>> We usually hear it as Jawade said: oldest first. But the important
    >>> point is to install the newest last. If there are only two, then it's
    >>> the same thing, but if you are installing 3 or more OSes, it might not
    >>> matter which comes first, so long as you finish with the latest.
    >>>
    >>> The Win7 Setup.exe knows exactly how to deal with any Win2K, WinXP or
    >>> Vista - or earlier Win7 - installations that it finds (and, yes, it will
    >>> look for them). But WinXP Setup hasn't the foggiest idea of what to do
    >>> about either Vista or Win7, neither of which even existed when that
    >>> version of Setup.exe was written back in 2001.
    >>>
    >>> One other fine point: Put the OS that is most likely to be abandoned
    >>> some day on the "other" partition. That way, when you decide to go Win7
    >>> all the way, it will be easy to delete the partition where WinXP is
    >>> installed if that is not also your "System Partition" that is used to
    >>> boot the computer.
    >>>
    >>> If it were my system and I were starting fresh with a new hard drive,
    >>> I'd repartition it before I start. Make the first partition quite
    >>> small - maybe as small as 1 GB - and mark it Active (bootable). Then
    >>> make the other two partitions for the two operating systems. Then
    >>> install WinXP to the third partition; it will write its few startup
    >>> files (NTLDR, NTDETECT.COM and Boot.ini) to the first partition and then
    >>> put its \Windows folder tree with all those other files into that third
    >>> partition. Finally, install Win7 to the second partition; it will put
    >>> its own few startup files (bootmgr and the hidden \Boot folder) into the
    >>> first partition - preserving NTLDR, etc., to be used in dual-booting
    >>> into WinXP - and then put all those other GBs of files into the \Windows
    >>> folder on the second partition.
    >>>
    >>> RC

    >
     
    John Fullbright [MVP], May 27, 2009
    #8
  9. You cannot boot from a GPT partition with the current hardware except
    for the IA64 Itanium. Vista na Win 7 can make a GPT partition, but you
    cannot boot from. The Win 7 alignment for the 1st partition is at
    1,048,576 bytes, not 1024.

    The forum's I'm finding references to partition alignment in are using
    MFT partitions, not GPT.


    John Fullbright [MVP] wrote:
    > In Windows 7 or Vista, it's a GPT partition, and aligned at 1MB. Next,
    > you have a 100MB reserved partition, then the "first" partition starts
    > at 101MB. You can use diskpart to verify.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "Kue2" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Hi Bobby
    >> Yes, sounds very interesting. I was not aware of partitioning aligning
    >> in Vista or in Win7. Maybe someone that is familiar with it
    >> will explain it in more detail.
    >>
    >> "Bobby Johnson" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> What about partition alignment? I have recently read multiple posts
    >>> and articles about Win 7 automatically aligning partitions for better
    >>> performance. Most of the articles point out that Vista also aligns
    >>> partitions but it wasn't a hot subject last year.
    >>>
    >>> I'm still trying to find Paul Harvey's "rest of the story" on
    >>> partition alignment. And, yes, I know it was previously thought to
    >>> only be applicable to RAID, but as I said before, it seems to be the
    >>> current 'in thing' for all hard drives.
    >>>
    >>> I am really curious about the whole alignment idea.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> R. C. White wrote:
    >>>> Hi, Kue2.
    >>>>
    >>>>> Not loading Vista loading Win7 - 32 RC build 7100
    >>>>
    >>>> But the rule still applies!
    >>>>
    >>>> The Golden Rule of dual-booting is to ALWAYS install the NEWEST
    >>>> operating system LAST!
    >>>>
    >>>> We usually hear it as Jawade said: oldest first. But the important
    >>>> point is to install the newest last. If there are only two, then
    >>>> it's the same thing, but if you are installing 3 or more OSes, it
    >>>> might not matter which comes first, so long as you finish with the
    >>>> latest.
    >>>>
    >>>> The Win7 Setup.exe knows exactly how to deal with any Win2K, WinXP
    >>>> or Vista - or earlier Win7 - installations that it finds (and, yes,
    >>>> it will look for them). But WinXP Setup hasn't the foggiest idea of
    >>>> what to do about either Vista or Win7, neither of which even existed
    >>>> when that version of Setup.exe was written back in 2001.
    >>>>
    >>>> One other fine point: Put the OS that is most likely to be
    >>>> abandoned some day on the "other" partition. That way, when you
    >>>> decide to go Win7 all the way, it will be easy to delete the
    >>>> partition where WinXP is installed if that is not also your "System
    >>>> Partition" that is used to boot the computer.
    >>>>
    >>>> If it were my system and I were starting fresh with a new hard
    >>>> drive, I'd repartition it before I start. Make the first partition
    >>>> quite small - maybe as small as 1 GB - and mark it Active
    >>>> (bootable). Then make the other two partitions for the two
    >>>> operating systems. Then install WinXP to the third partition; it
    >>>> will write its few startup files (NTLDR, NTDETECT.COM and Boot.ini)
    >>>> to the first partition and then put its \Windows folder tree with
    >>>> all those other files into that third partition. Finally, install
    >>>> Win7 to the second partition; it will put its own few startup files
    >>>> (bootmgr and the hidden \Boot folder) into the first partition -
    >>>> preserving NTLDR, etc., to be used in dual-booting into WinXP - and
    >>>> then put all those other GBs of files into the \Windows folder on
    >>>> the second partition.
    >>>>
    >>>> RC

    >>
     
    Bobby Johnson, May 27, 2009
    #9
  10. 1MB = 1024 * 1024 bytes is 1048576 bytes.



    "Bobby Johnson" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > You cannot boot from a GPT partition with the current hardware except for
    > the IA64 Itanium. Vista na Win 7 can make a GPT partition, but you cannot
    > boot from. The Win 7 alignment for the 1st partition is at 1,048,576
    > bytes, not 1024.
    >
    > The forum's I'm finding references to partition alignment in are using MFT
    > partitions, not GPT.
    >
    >
    > John Fullbright [MVP] wrote:
    >> In Windows 7 or Vista, it's a GPT partition, and aligned at 1MB. Next,
    >> you have a 100MB reserved partition, then the "first" partition starts at
    >> 101MB. You can use diskpart to verify.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> "Kue2" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> Hi Bobby
    >>> Yes, sounds very interesting. I was not aware of partitioning aligning
    >>> in Vista or in Win7. Maybe someone that is familiar with it
    >>> will explain it in more detail.
    >>>
    >>> "Bobby Johnson" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>>> What about partition alignment? I have recently read multiple posts
    >>>> and articles about Win 7 automatically aligning partitions for better
    >>>> performance. Most of the articles point out that Vista also aligns
    >>>> partitions but it wasn't a hot subject last year.
    >>>>
    >>>> I'm still trying to find Paul Harvey's "rest of the story" on partition
    >>>> alignment. And, yes, I know it was previously thought to only be
    >>>> applicable to RAID, but as I said before, it seems to be the current
    >>>> 'in thing' for all hard drives.
    >>>>
    >>>> I am really curious about the whole alignment idea.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> R. C. White wrote:
    >>>>> Hi, Kue2.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> Not loading Vista loading Win7 - 32 RC build 7100
    >>>>>
    >>>>> But the rule still applies!
    >>>>>
    >>>>> The Golden Rule of dual-booting is to ALWAYS install the NEWEST
    >>>>> operating system LAST!
    >>>>>
    >>>>> We usually hear it as Jawade said: oldest first. But the important
    >>>>> point is to install the newest last. If there are only two, then it's
    >>>>> the same thing, but if you are installing 3 or more OSes, it might not
    >>>>> matter which comes first, so long as you finish with the latest.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> The Win7 Setup.exe knows exactly how to deal with any Win2K, WinXP or
    >>>>> Vista - or earlier Win7 - installations that it finds (and, yes, it
    >>>>> will look for them). But WinXP Setup hasn't the foggiest idea of what
    >>>>> to do about either Vista or Win7, neither of which even existed when
    >>>>> that version of Setup.exe was written back in 2001.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> One other fine point: Put the OS that is most likely to be abandoned
    >>>>> some day on the "other" partition. That way, when you decide to go
    >>>>> Win7 all the way, it will be easy to delete the partition where WinXP
    >>>>> is installed if that is not also your "System Partition" that is used
    >>>>> to boot the computer.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> If it were my system and I were starting fresh with a new hard drive,
    >>>>> I'd repartition it before I start. Make the first partition quite
    >>>>> small - maybe as small as 1 GB - and mark it Active (bootable). Then
    >>>>> make the other two partitions for the two operating systems. Then
    >>>>> install WinXP to the third partition; it will write its few startup
    >>>>> files (NTLDR, NTDETECT.COM and Boot.ini) to the first partition and
    >>>>> then put its \Windows folder tree with all those other files into that
    >>>>> third partition. Finally, install Win7 to the second partition; it
    >>>>> will put its own few startup files (bootmgr and the hidden \Boot
    >>>>> folder) into the first partition - preserving NTLDR, etc., to be used
    >>>>> in dual-booting into WinXP - and then put all those other GBs of files
    >>>>> into the \Windows folder on the second partition.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> RC
    >>>
     
    John Fullbright [MVP], May 29, 2009
    #10
  11. The particular box I checked on is in fact IA64. It has an EFI partition
    and the MS reserved partition.

    My X64 box is indeed a partition type of MBR, however the starting offset is
    still 1MB (1024*1024 or 1048576 bytes), followed by the MS reserved
    partition of 100MB. The "C" partition starts at 101MB.



    "Bobby Johnson" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > You cannot boot from a GPT partition with the current hardware except for
    > the IA64 Itanium. Vista na Win 7 can make a GPT partition, but you cannot
    > boot from. The Win 7 alignment for the 1st partition is at 1,048,576
    > bytes, not 1024.
    >
    > The forum's I'm finding references to partition alignment in are using MFT
    > partitions, not GPT.
    >
    >
    > John Fullbright [MVP] wrote:
    >> In Windows 7 or Vista, it's a GPT partition, and aligned at 1MB. Next,
    >> you have a 100MB reserved partition, then the "first" partition starts at
    >> 101MB. You can use diskpart to verify.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> "Kue2" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> Hi Bobby
    >>> Yes, sounds very interesting. I was not aware of partitioning aligning
    >>> in Vista or in Win7. Maybe someone that is familiar with it
    >>> will explain it in more detail.
    >>>
    >>> "Bobby Johnson" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>>> What about partition alignment? I have recently read multiple posts
    >>>> and articles about Win 7 automatically aligning partitions for better
    >>>> performance. Most of the articles point out that Vista also aligns
    >>>> partitions but it wasn't a hot subject last year.
    >>>>
    >>>> I'm still trying to find Paul Harvey's "rest of the story" on partition
    >>>> alignment. And, yes, I know it was previously thought to only be
    >>>> applicable to RAID, but as I said before, it seems to be the current
    >>>> 'in thing' for all hard drives.
    >>>>
    >>>> I am really curious about the whole alignment idea.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> R. C. White wrote:
    >>>>> Hi, Kue2.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> Not loading Vista loading Win7 - 32 RC build 7100
    >>>>>
    >>>>> But the rule still applies!
    >>>>>
    >>>>> The Golden Rule of dual-booting is to ALWAYS install the NEWEST
    >>>>> operating system LAST!
    >>>>>
    >>>>> We usually hear it as Jawade said: oldest first. But the important
    >>>>> point is to install the newest last. If there are only two, then it's
    >>>>> the same thing, but if you are installing 3 or more OSes, it might not
    >>>>> matter which comes first, so long as you finish with the latest.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> The Win7 Setup.exe knows exactly how to deal with any Win2K, WinXP or
    >>>>> Vista - or earlier Win7 - installations that it finds (and, yes, it
    >>>>> will look for them). But WinXP Setup hasn't the foggiest idea of what
    >>>>> to do about either Vista or Win7, neither of which even existed when
    >>>>> that version of Setup.exe was written back in 2001.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> One other fine point: Put the OS that is most likely to be abandoned
    >>>>> some day on the "other" partition. That way, when you decide to go
    >>>>> Win7 all the way, it will be easy to delete the partition where WinXP
    >>>>> is installed if that is not also your "System Partition" that is used
    >>>>> to boot the computer.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> If it were my system and I were starting fresh with a new hard drive,
    >>>>> I'd repartition it before I start. Make the first partition quite
    >>>>> small - maybe as small as 1 GB - and mark it Active (bootable). Then
    >>>>> make the other two partitions for the two operating systems. Then
    >>>>> install WinXP to the third partition; it will write its few startup
    >>>>> files (NTLDR, NTDETECT.COM and Boot.ini) to the first partition and
    >>>>> then put its \Windows folder tree with all those other files into that
    >>>>> third partition. Finally, install Win7 to the second partition; it
    >>>>> will put its own few startup files (bootmgr and the hidden \Boot
    >>>>> folder) into the first partition - preserving NTLDR, etc., to be used
    >>>>> in dual-booting into WinXP - and then put all those other GBs of files
    >>>>> into the \Windows folder on the second partition.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> RC
    >>>
     
    John Fullbright [MVP], May 29, 2009
    #11
  12. I realized my mistake after I hit <Send>.

    Thanks

    John Fullbright [MVP] wrote:
    > 1MB = 1024 * 1024 bytes is 1048576 bytes.
    >
    >
    >
    > "Bobby Johnson" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> You cannot boot from a GPT partition with the current hardware except
    >> for the IA64 Itanium. Vista na Win 7 can make a GPT partition, but
    >> you cannot boot from. The Win 7 alignment for the 1st partition is at
    >> 1,048,576 bytes, not 1024.
    >>
    >> The forum's I'm finding references to partition alignment in are using
    >> MFT partitions, not GPT.
    >>
    >>
    >> John Fullbright [MVP] wrote:
    >>> In Windows 7 or Vista, it's a GPT partition, and aligned at 1MB.
    >>> Next, you have a 100MB reserved partition, then the "first" partition
    >>> starts at 101MB. You can use diskpart to verify.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> "Kue2" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>>> Hi Bobby
    >>>> Yes, sounds very interesting. I was not aware of partitioning
    >>>> aligning in Vista or in Win7. Maybe someone that is familiar with it
    >>>> will explain it in more detail.
    >>>>
    >>>> "Bobby Johnson" <> wrote in
    >>>> message news:...
    >>>>> What about partition alignment? I have recently read multiple
    >>>>> posts and articles about Win 7 automatically aligning partitions
    >>>>> for better performance. Most of the articles point out that Vista
    >>>>> also aligns partitions but it wasn't a hot subject last year.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I'm still trying to find Paul Harvey's "rest of the story" on
    >>>>> partition alignment. And, yes, I know it was previously thought to
    >>>>> only be applicable to RAID, but as I said before, it seems to be
    >>>>> the current 'in thing' for all hard drives.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I am really curious about the whole alignment idea.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> R. C. White wrote:
    >>>>>> Hi, Kue2.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Not loading Vista loading Win7 - 32 RC build 7100
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> But the rule still applies!
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> The Golden Rule of dual-booting is to ALWAYS install the NEWEST
    >>>>>> operating system LAST!
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> We usually hear it as Jawade said: oldest first. But the
    >>>>>> important point is to install the newest last. If there are only
    >>>>>> two, then it's the same thing, but if you are installing 3 or more
    >>>>>> OSes, it might not matter which comes first, so long as you finish
    >>>>>> with the latest.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> The Win7 Setup.exe knows exactly how to deal with any Win2K, WinXP
    >>>>>> or Vista - or earlier Win7 - installations that it finds (and,
    >>>>>> yes, it will look for them). But WinXP Setup hasn't the foggiest
    >>>>>> idea of what to do about either Vista or Win7, neither of which
    >>>>>> even existed when that version of Setup.exe was written back in 2001.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> One other fine point: Put the OS that is most likely to be
    >>>>>> abandoned some day on the "other" partition. That way, when you
    >>>>>> decide to go Win7 all the way, it will be easy to delete the
    >>>>>> partition where WinXP is installed if that is not also your
    >>>>>> "System Partition" that is used to boot the computer.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> If it were my system and I were starting fresh with a new hard
    >>>>>> drive, I'd repartition it before I start. Make the first
    >>>>>> partition quite small - maybe as small as 1 GB - and mark it
    >>>>>> Active (bootable). Then make the other two partitions for the two
    >>>>>> operating systems. Then install WinXP to the third partition; it
    >>>>>> will write its few startup files (NTLDR, NTDETECT.COM and
    >>>>>> Boot.ini) to the first partition and then put its \Windows folder
    >>>>>> tree with all those other files into that third partition.
    >>>>>> Finally, install Win7 to the second partition; it will put its own
    >>>>>> few startup files (bootmgr and the hidden \Boot folder) into the
    >>>>>> first partition - preserving NTLDR, etc., to be used in
    >>>>>> dual-booting into WinXP - and then put all those other GBs of
    >>>>>> files into the \Windows folder on the second partition.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> RC
    >>>>
     
    Bobby Johnson, May 29, 2009
    #12
  13. Microsoft started this alignment with Vista. XP 32-bit didn't have it
    and I don't think XP x64 or 2003 had it.


    John Fullbright [MVP] wrote:
    > The particular box I checked on is in fact IA64. It has an EFI
    > partition and the MS reserved partition.
    >
    > My X64 box is indeed a partition type of MBR, however the starting
    > offset is still 1MB (1024*1024 or 1048576 bytes), followed by the MS
    > reserved partition of 100MB. The "C" partition starts at 101MB.
    >
    >
    >
    > "Bobby Johnson" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> You cannot boot from a GPT partition with the current hardware except
    >> for the IA64 Itanium. Vista na Win 7 can make a GPT partition, but
    >> you cannot boot from. The Win 7 alignment for the 1st partition is at
    >> 1,048,576 bytes, not 1024.
    >>
    >> The forum's I'm finding references to partition alignment in are using
    >> MFT partitions, not GPT.
    >>
    >>
    >> John Fullbright [MVP] wrote:
    >>> In Windows 7 or Vista, it's a GPT partition, and aligned at 1MB.
    >>> Next, you have a 100MB reserved partition, then the "first" partition
    >>> starts at 101MB. You can use diskpart to verify.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> "Kue2" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>>> Hi Bobby
    >>>> Yes, sounds very interesting. I was not aware of partitioning
    >>>> aligning in Vista or in Win7. Maybe someone that is familiar with it
    >>>> will explain it in more detail.
    >>>>
    >>>> "Bobby Johnson" <> wrote in
    >>>> message news:...
    >>>>> What about partition alignment? I have recently read multiple
    >>>>> posts and articles about Win 7 automatically aligning partitions
    >>>>> for better performance. Most of the articles point out that Vista
    >>>>> also aligns partitions but it wasn't a hot subject last year.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I'm still trying to find Paul Harvey's "rest of the story" on
    >>>>> partition alignment. And, yes, I know it was previously thought to
    >>>>> only be applicable to RAID, but as I said before, it seems to be
    >>>>> the current 'in thing' for all hard drives.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I am really curious about the whole alignment idea.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> R. C. White wrote:
    >>>>>> Hi, Kue2.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Not loading Vista loading Win7 - 32 RC build 7100
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> But the rule still applies!
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> The Golden Rule of dual-booting is to ALWAYS install the NEWEST
    >>>>>> operating system LAST!
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> We usually hear it as Jawade said: oldest first. But the
    >>>>>> important point is to install the newest last. If there are only
    >>>>>> two, then it's the same thing, but if you are installing 3 or more
    >>>>>> OSes, it might not matter which comes first, so long as you finish
    >>>>>> with the latest.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> The Win7 Setup.exe knows exactly how to deal with any Win2K, WinXP
    >>>>>> or Vista - or earlier Win7 - installations that it finds (and,
    >>>>>> yes, it will look for them). But WinXP Setup hasn't the foggiest
    >>>>>> idea of what to do about either Vista or Win7, neither of which
    >>>>>> even existed when that version of Setup.exe was written back in 2001.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> One other fine point: Put the OS that is most likely to be
    >>>>>> abandoned some day on the "other" partition. That way, when you
    >>>>>> decide to go Win7 all the way, it will be easy to delete the
    >>>>>> partition where WinXP is installed if that is not also your
    >>>>>> "System Partition" that is used to boot the computer.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> If it were my system and I were starting fresh with a new hard
    >>>>>> drive, I'd repartition it before I start. Make the first
    >>>>>> partition quite small - maybe as small as 1 GB - and mark it
    >>>>>> Active (bootable). Then make the other two partitions for the two
    >>>>>> operating systems. Then install WinXP to the third partition; it
    >>>>>> will write its few startup files (NTLDR, NTDETECT.COM and
    >>>>>> Boot.ini) to the first partition and then put its \Windows folder
    >>>>>> tree with all those other files into that third partition.
    >>>>>> Finally, install Win7 to the second partition; it will put its own
    >>>>>> few startup files (bootmgr and the hidden \Boot folder) into the
    >>>>>> first partition - preserving NTLDR, etc., to be used in
    >>>>>> dual-booting into WinXP - and then put all those other GBs of
    >>>>>> files into the \Windows folder on the second partition.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> RC
    >>>>
     
    Bobby Johnson, May 29, 2009
    #13
  14. Kue2

    TMA Guest

    Nice post, R. C. White!

    Tell me if I'm wrong, but I believe Vista/Win7 will create automatically a
    small partition at the beginning of the drive to be the boot partition. Some
    partitioning software will detect it and some others won't. Kind of weird.

    I'd just add something to your comment ... if you make all the partitions
    visible during setup for a new OS to be installed, sometimes you will get
    your \windows directory assigned to another drive letter other than C:\.
    Considering it might confuse some programs (specially the old ones), I'd
    recommend anyone to make all other partitions hidden during setup and then
    you can always unhide them later. After install, you can go to computer
    management and assign any drive letter you want for your extra partitions.
    Some apps will even let you use ext3 (linux) and hfs (mac) partitions.


    "R. C. White" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi, Kue2.
    >
    >> Not loading Vista loading Win7 - 32 RC build 7100

    >
    > But the rule still applies!
    >
    > The Golden Rule of dual-booting is to ALWAYS install the NEWEST operating
    > system LAST!
    >
    > We usually hear it as Jawade said: oldest first. But the important point
    > is to install the newest last. If there are only two, then it's the same
    > thing, but if you are installing 3 or more OSes, it might not matter which
    > comes first, so long as you finish with the latest.
    >
    > The Win7 Setup.exe knows exactly how to deal with any Win2K, WinXP or
    > Vista - or earlier Win7 - installations that it finds (and, yes, it will
    > look for them). But WinXP Setup hasn't the foggiest idea of what to do
    > about either Vista or Win7, neither of which even existed when that
    > version of Setup.exe was written back in 2001.
    >
    > One other fine point: Put the OS that is most likely to be abandoned some
    > day on the "other" partition. That way, when you decide to go Win7 all
    > the way, it will be easy to delete the partition where WinXP is installed
    > if that is not also your "System Partition" that is used to boot the
    > computer.
    >
    > If it were my system and I were starting fresh with a new hard drive, I'd
    > repartition it before I start. Make the first partition quite small -
    > maybe as small as 1 GB - and mark it Active (bootable). Then make the
    > other two partitions for the two operating systems. Then install WinXP to
    > the third partition; it will write its few startup files (NTLDR,
    > NTDETECT.COM and Boot.ini) to the first partition and then put its
    > \Windows folder tree with all those other files into that third partition.
    > Finally, install Win7 to the second partition; it will put its own few
    > startup files (bootmgr and the hidden \Boot folder) into the first
    > partition - preserving NTLDR, etc., to be used in dual-booting into
    > WinXP - and then put all those other GBs of files into the \Windows folder
    > on the second partition.
    >
    > RC
    > --
    > R. C. White, CPA
    > San Marcos, TX
    >
    > Microsoft Windows MVP
    > Windows Live Mail 2009 (14.0.8064.0206) in Win7 Ultimate x64 RC 7100
    >
    > "Kue2" <> wrote in message
    > news:D...
    >> Not loading Vista loading Win7 - 32 RC build 7100
    >>
    >> "Jawade" <> wrote in message
    >> news:090524$...
    >>> Op Zondag 24 Mei 2009 13:57:05 -0400, schreef Kue2 <> in
    >>> artikel <>:
    >>>> One hard drive Partitioned, Partition 1 & Partition 2.
    >>>> Two OS's to load WinXP64 & Windows 7-32bit.
    >>>> Which Os do I load first? Does it matter which Partition I use?
    >>>
    >>> Always the oldest first. The partition doesnt matter. Maybe Vista on
    >>> the first.
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> Met vriendelijke groeten, Jawade. Kolibrie Software Tools:
    >>> http://jawade.nl/ 1 april: HexEditor, Diskeditors met MBR-rebuilders!
    >>> Bootmanager (+Vista +Linux +Engels), ClrMBR, SDir(DIRsize), POP3lezer,
    >>> Console-filebrowser, Kalender, Webtellers en IP-log, USB-stick tester.

    >
    >
     
    TMA, Jun 5, 2009
    #14
  15. Kue2

    R. C. White Guest

    Hi, TMA.

    Thanks for the compliment. ;<)

    > Tell me if I'm wrong, but I believe Vista/Win7 will create automatically a
    > small partition at the beginning of the drive to be the boot partition.
    > Some partitioning software will detect it and some others won't. Kind of
    > weird.


    Win7 (but not Vista) will automatically create that partition, but only on a
    "virgin" HDD and, thus, only when installed by booting from the DVD. When
    adding Win7 to an already-partitioned HDD, Setup can't do this. So,
    obviously, it can't do it if we are running Setup from an existing Windows
    installation. (I've heard about this unlettered partition but haven't seen
    it because my HDDs are already partitioned, as discussed below.)

    About "drive" letters: This is one of my pet peeves because it is one of
    the hardest mindsets to break! "Drive" has many meanings, just like "right"
    and "left" and so many other English words. And in computer-speak, it
    sometimes refers to the physical hardware, but more often to just a
    partition - just a defined portion of the physical disk. Our often cavalier
    use of the word "drive" causes one of the biggest fallacies ingrained into
    the minds of new computer users - and the fallacy persists even in many
    (most?) computer veterans. :>(

    "Drive" letters are never assigned to physical disks; those are assigned
    NUMBERS, not letters. They start with zero, which is why Disk Management
    calls the HDDs "Disk 0", "Disk 1", etc. Each "drive" letter actually is
    assigned to a "volume", which can be either a primary partition or a logical
    drive in an extended partition on an HDD - or to a partition on a flash
    drive (not the flash drive itself) or to a partition on a CD/DVD drive (not
    to the whole drive) or to a camera or a card reader. (I've never had a
    network, but I understand that they also use "drive" letters.) But we began
    to refer to Drive A: way back when we first started to use floppy disks in
    the 1970's - and the term really did refer to the whole 67.5 KB diskette.
    The name stuck when we added hard disk drives, reserving letters A: and B:
    for the typical two floppy drives and assigning Drive C: to THE hard disk.
    Then we learned how to divide the hard disk platter into "partitions" and
    assign a different letter to each partition. But we continued to use the
    term "drive" to refer to each of the partitions, rather than to the entire
    disk. When we began to need more than 4 partitions on a single disk, we
    created one "extended partition" on the disk; we did not assign a letter to
    the extended partition, but we created one or more logical drives in the
    extended partition and assigned a "drive" letter to each of those logical
    drives. (We now often use the term "volume" to refer to either a primary
    partition or a logical drive.) And then came optical drives, flash drives
    and all those other "drives".

    If you run Disk Management, you will see this clearly in the Graphical View.
    Disk 0 might include 2 primary partitions and an extended partition with 3
    logical drives. The "drive" letters might be F:, C:, X:, D:, R:... In
    other words, the letters are independent of the sequence on the HDD. In
    fact, there may not be a Drive C: at all - which blows the mindset I
    mentioned, but is perfectly legal.

    Vista changed the algorithm for assigning drive letters during Setup. In
    WinXP, Setup first assigned Drive C: to the System Partition, which usually
    was also the boot volume. (See the oft-cited KB 314470 for the
    counterintuitive definitions of "system volume" and "boot volume" - legacy
    terms that cause and perpetuate much confusion.) Then it assigned letters
    to the other partitions, optical drives, etc. Vista Setup, though, when run
    by booting from the Vista DVD, assigns Drive C: to its own boot volume,
    which might be the 3rd partition on the second HDD! And then it assigns
    other letters in sequence, starting over with the first primary partition on
    Disk 0, so it is quite probable that in a computer that already has an OS
    installed, the System Partition will become Drive D:. This will NOT confuse
    the computer, or Vista or other Windows installations - or any well-written
    utility or application. But it WILL confuse any user who is bound by the
    WinXP mindset. They will think it is "weird". :^}

    We should always assign each volume a unique name (label), which will be
    written to the disk and will be the same, no matter which OS is running, and
    no matter what "drive" letter is currently assigned.

    > After install, you can go to computer management and assign any drive
    > letter you want for your extra partitions.


    True - for all EXCEPT the system and boot volumes. These letters can be
    changed only by running Setup again - which means starting over by
    installing Windows again.

    > Some apps will even let you use ext3 (linux) and hfs (mac) partitions.


    I have NO experience with Linux or Mac or other operating systems. (Well, I
    did start with the TRS-80, then TRS-DOS and its many variants, then CP/M and
    finally MS-DOS - and even tried to use OS/2 - but those were all more than a
    decade ago.) I used Partition Magic until Disk Management appeared in
    Windows 2000; I've seldom used anything but DM and DiskPart.exe since then.

    My only computer now has 4 HDDs, but the system sees them as 3 because the
    3rd and 4th are combined in a single RAID 1 mirror, so I usually speak of
    them as a single HDD. Each HDD has a single small primary partition and a
    large extended partition covering the rest of the disk and divided into
    several logical drives. Each primary partition is marked Active (bootable)
    and has the startup files on it, along with WinXP's NTLDR, etc. So I can
    boot from Disk 1 if Disk 0 is damaged - or if I want to bypass Win7 and boot
    directly into WinXP. Because of participation in several betas, including
    Vista and Win7, I need to install the latest build several times a year. So
    I'm a frequent user of Disk Management to delete old volumes (logical
    drives), create and format new ones, and do other disk management tasks. I
    have plenty of disk space since adding a 1 TB HDD last year, but I'm running
    out of letters for drives. :^{

    As I said, if we run Vista (or Win7) Setup by booting from its DVD, it has
    no idea what drive letters may have already been assigned by WinXP or any
    other OS, so it assigns C: to its own boot volume (wherever WE tell it to
    install Vista) and then assigns other letters according to its
    factory-installed algorithm. But if we boot into WinXP (for example) and
    run Vista's Setup.exe from there, Setup can see WinXP's existing letter
    assignments and will respect those. So if we use Disk Management in WinXP
    to create a new volume and name it V: (for Vista), then run Vista Setup from
    the WinXP desktop, we can tell Setup to install Vista in Drive V: - and it
    will. And if WinXP sees the System Partition as Drive C:, so will Vista.
    And if Drive G: is "Games" in WinXP, it will still be Games (G:) in Vista.
    YOU may be confused to find your apps installed in V:\Program Files, but
    Vista won't think it weird at all. (I'm currently running Win7; my boot
    volume is X:, the 9th logical drive on Disk 1; my System Partition is Drive
    D:, the first partition on Disk 0. Drive C: is the 1st logical drive on
    Disk 0; it is the boot volume for Vista x64, but Win7 sees it as "just
    another volume".)


    In my usual long-winded way, I hope this answers some of your questions,
    TMA. ;<}

    RC
    --
    R. C. White, CPA
    San Marcos, TX

    Microsoft Windows MVP
    Windows Live Mail 2009 (14.0.8064.0206) in Win7 Ultimate x64 RC 7100

    "TMA" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Nice post, R. C. White!
    >
    > Tell me if I'm wrong, but I believe Vista/Win7 will create automatically a
    > small partition at the beginning of the drive to be the boot partition.
    > Some partitioning software will detect it and some others won't. Kind of
    > weird.
    >
    > I'd just add something to your comment ... if you make all the partitions
    > visible during setup for a new OS to be installed, sometimes you will get
    > your \windows directory assigned to another drive letter other than C:\.
    > Considering it might confuse some programs (specially the old ones), I'd
    > recommend anyone to make all other partitions hidden during setup and then
    > you can always unhide them later. After install, you can go to computer
    > management and assign any drive letter you want for your extra partitions.
    > Some apps will even let you use ext3 (linux) and hfs (mac) partitions.
    >
    >
    > "R. C. White" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Hi, Kue2.
    >>
    >>> Not loading Vista loading Win7 - 32 RC build 7100

    >>
    >> But the rule still applies!
    >>
    >> The Golden Rule of dual-booting is to ALWAYS install the NEWEST operating
    >> system LAST!
    >>
    >> We usually hear it as Jawade said: oldest first. But the important
    >> point is to install the newest last. If there are only two, then it's
    >> the same thing, but if you are installing 3 or more OSes, it might not
    >> matter which comes first, so long as you finish with the latest.
    >>
    >> The Win7 Setup.exe knows exactly how to deal with any Win2K, WinXP or
    >> Vista - or earlier Win7 - installations that it finds (and, yes, it will
    >> look for them). But WinXP Setup hasn't the foggiest idea of what to do
    >> about either Vista or Win7, neither of which even existed when that
    >> version of Setup.exe was written back in 2001.
    >>
    >> One other fine point: Put the OS that is most likely to be abandoned
    >> some day on the "other" partition. That way, when you decide to go Win7
    >> all the way, it will be easy to delete the partition where WinXP is
    >> installed if that is not also your "System Partition" that is used to
    >> boot the computer.
    >>
    >> If it were my system and I were starting fresh with a new hard drive, I'd
    >> repartition it before I start. Make the first partition quite small -
    >> maybe as small as 1 GB - and mark it Active (bootable). Then make the
    >> other two partitions for the two operating systems. Then install WinXP
    >> to the third partition; it will write its few startup files (NTLDR,
    >> NTDETECT.COM and Boot.ini) to the first partition and then put its
    >> \Windows folder tree with all those other files into that third
    >> partition. Finally, install Win7 to the second partition; it will put its
    >> own few startup files (bootmgr and the hidden \Boot folder) into the
    >> first partition - preserving NTLDR, etc., to be used in dual-booting into
    >> WinXP - and then put all those other GBs of files into the \Windows
    >> folder on the second partition.
    >>
    >> RC
    >>
    >> "Kue2" <> wrote in message
    >> news:D...
    >>> Not loading Vista loading Win7 - 32 RC build 7100
    >>>
    >>> "Jawade" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:090524$...
    >>>> Op Zondag 24 Mei 2009 13:57:05 -0400, schreef Kue2 <>
    >>>> in artikel <>:
    >>>>> One hard drive Partitioned, Partition 1 & Partition 2.
    >>>>> Two OS's to load WinXP64 & Windows 7-32bit.
    >>>>> Which Os do I load first? Does it matter which Partition I use?
    >>>>
    >>>> Always the oldest first. The partition doesnt matter. Maybe Vista on
    >>>> the first.
    >>>>
    >>>> --
    >>>> Met vriendelijke groeten, Jawade.
     
    R. C. White, Jun 5, 2009
    #15
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