optical zoom

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by KyJim, Jan 28, 2004.

  1. KyJim

    KyJim Guest

    This question may have been answered before, but I'm new to this new "News
    Group".

    I am going to purchase a Digital Camera in the next week. I am currently
    leaning toward a Canon Digital Rebel (I current have a Rebel "G" 35mm)

    My question is how does optical zoom relate to a 35mm lens?

    Any suggestions on which camera is a good camera for novice wanting to get
    to photography in his retirement will be greatly appreciated.

    Thank You...
    KyJim, Jan 28, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. "KyJim" <> writes:

    > This question may have been answered before, but I'm new to this new "News
    > Group".
    >
    > I am going to purchase a Digital Camera in the next week. I am currently
    > leaning toward a Canon Digital Rebel (I current have a Rebel "G" 35mm)
    >
    > My question is how does optical zoom relate to a 35mm lens?
    >
    > Any suggestions on which camera is a good camera for novice wanting to get
    > to photography in his retirement will be greatly appreciated.


    Since the sensor on the Canon Digital Rebel is smaller than the 24x36mm size
    that 35mm film uses, you need to multiply the 35mm lenses focal range by 1.6,
    ie the 18-55mm lens that comes with the kit gives you the equivalent of a
    28.8-88mm lens. The zoom ratio (3x in the case of the kit lens) is the same,
    since it is a ratio between the focal length at telephoto divided by the focal
    length at wide angle.

    --
    Michael Meissner
    email:
    http://www.the-meissners.org
    Michael Meissner, Jan 28, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. KyJim

    Mark Herring Guest

    On Wed, 28 Jan 2004 00:41:34 GMT, "KyJim" <> wrote:

    >This question may have been answered before, but I'm new to this new "News
    >Group".
    >
    >I am going to purchase a Digital Camera in the next week. I am currently
    >leaning toward a Canon Digital Rebel (I current have a Rebel "G" 35mm)
    >
    >My question is how does optical zoom relate to a 35mm lens?


    What the "conventional" world calls a zoom lens is "optical zoom" in
    the digital world. The key is that the focal length---and hence
    magnification---is variable.

    "Digital zoom" is unique to the digicam world and has no real value.
    >
    >Any suggestions on which camera is a good camera for novice wanting to get
    >to photography in his retirement will be greatly appreciated.


    Digital rebel gets high marks, but only you can decide which end of
    the pool to jump into first. You can do a lot with a 2-4 Mpixel point
    and shoot.

    Do you want to have money left over for: ?
    Printer, ink and paper
    Computer with lots of RAM
    Extra hard drives for backup
    memory cards
    card reader
    Editor--eg Photoshop

    More advice if you tell us what kind of photos you want to take, size
    of prints., etd.
    >
    >Thank You...
    >


    **************************
    Mark Herring, Pasadena, Calif.
    Private e-mail: Just say no to "No".
    Mark Herring, Jan 28, 2004
    #3
  4. In addition to Mark's comments there is also a conversion factor for any
    35 mm lens used on a digital camera with a sensor smaller than standard
    35mm. In this case I seem to remember it being about 1.3 or a 100-200 mm
    zoom lens becomes the equivalent of a 130 - 260 mm zoom.

    --
    Joseph E. Meehan

    26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math


    "KyJim" <> wrote in message
    news:2zDRb.130594$sv6.691945@attbi_s52...
    > This question may have been answered before, but I'm new to this new "News
    > Group".
    >
    > I am going to purchase a Digital Camera in the next week. I am currently
    > leaning toward a Canon Digital Rebel (I current have a Rebel "G" 35mm)
    >
    > My question is how does optical zoom relate to a 35mm lens?
    >
    > Any suggestions on which camera is a good camera for novice wanting to get
    > to photography in his retirement will be greatly appreciated.
    >
    > Thank You...
    >
    >
    Joseph Meehan, Jan 28, 2004
    #4
  5. "Joseph Meehan" <> wrote in message
    news:t9ERb.8000$...
    > In addition to Mark's comments there is also a conversion factor for

    any
    > 35 mm lens used on a digital camera with a sensor smaller than standard
    > 35mm. In this case I seem to remember it being about 1.3 or a 100-200 mm
    > zoom lens becomes the equivalent of a 130 - 260 mm zoom.


    160-320mm. The 10D is 1.6, 1D is 1.3

    --
    Here lies the late Martin Francis
    He couldn't tell you the technical merits of Leitz and Zeiss
    But he did take some photographs once.
    Martin Francis, Jan 28, 2004
    #5
  6. Thanks, my memory is flawed from time to time.

    --
    Joseph E. Meehan

    26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math


    "Martin Francis" <> wrote in
    message news:bv7644$ahq$...
    > "Joseph Meehan" <> wrote in message
    > news:t9ERb.8000$...
    > > In addition to Mark's comments there is also a conversion factor for

    > any
    > > 35 mm lens used on a digital camera with a sensor smaller than standard
    > > 35mm. In this case I seem to remember it being about 1.3 or a 100-200

    mm
    > > zoom lens becomes the equivalent of a 130 - 260 mm zoom.

    >
    > 160-320mm. The 10D is 1.6, 1D is 1.3
    >
    > --
    > Here lies the late Martin Francis
    > He couldn't tell you the technical merits of Leitz and Zeiss
    > But he did take some photographs once.
    >
    >
    Joseph Meehan, Jan 28, 2004
    #6
  7. KyJim

    KyJim Guest

    I would like to take landscapes, picture of old barns and buildings. Then if
    any turn out to be any good frame them for family and friends.

    I already have the top of the line HP photo printer and scanner, along with
    a Gateway computer that is capable of doing anything I will want to do. I
    also have PhotoShop 7.

    Don't know a whole lot about any of it yet but am looking forward to
    learning.
    "Mark Herring" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Wed, 28 Jan 2004 00:41:34 GMT, "KyJim" <> wrote:
    >
    > >This question may have been answered before, but I'm new to this new

    "News
    > >Group".
    > >
    > >I am going to purchase a Digital Camera in the next week. I am currently
    > >leaning toward a Canon Digital Rebel (I current have a Rebel "G" 35mm)
    > >
    > >My question is how does optical zoom relate to a 35mm lens?

    >
    > What the "conventional" world calls a zoom lens is "optical zoom" in
    > the digital world. The key is that the focal length---and hence
    > magnification---is variable.
    >
    > "Digital zoom" is unique to the digicam world and has no real value.
    > >
    > >Any suggestions on which camera is a good camera for novice wanting to

    get
    > >to photography in his retirement will be greatly appreciated.

    >
    > Digital rebel gets high marks, but only you can decide which end of
    > the pool to jump into first. You can do a lot with a 2-4 Mpixel point
    > and shoot.
    >
    > Do you want to have money left over for: ?
    > Printer, ink and paper
    > Computer with lots of RAM
    > Extra hard drives for backup
    > memory cards
    > card reader
    > Editor--eg Photoshop
    >
    > More advice if you tell us what kind of photos you want to take, size
    > of prints., etd.
    > >
    > >Thank You...
    > >

    >
    > **************************
    > Mark Herring, Pasadena, Calif.
    > Private e-mail: Just say no to "No".
    >
    KyJim, Jan 28, 2004
    #7
  8. KyJim

    LLutton Guest

    > In addition to Mark's comments there is also a conversion factor for any
    >35 mm lens used on a digital camera with a sensor smaller than standard
    >35mm. In this case I seem to remember it being about 1.3 or a 100-200 mm
    >zoom lens becomes the equivalent of a 130 - 260 mm zoom.


    I missed the first post, so I don't know if the question pertains to just
    digital SLR 's. Most of the point and shoot digital cameras have such small
    sensors thae ration is more like 4:1. The better SLR's are around 1.3:1 to
    1.6:1.
    Lynn
    LLutton, Jan 28, 2004
    #8
  9. KyJim

    Don Stauffer Guest

    An optical 'zoom' lens works the same way regardless of which sort of
    camera it is on.

    Before zoom lenses, photographers with cameras that allowed
    interchangeable lenses needed to carry an assortment of lenses, usually
    at least three. A 'normal lens' of moderate focal length, a telephoto
    lens of long focal length, and a wide angle lens of very short focal
    length.

    When lens designers and manufacturers developed the first practical zoom
    lenses, these lenses combined a normal, a moderate wide angle, and a
    telephoto lens all in one lens. Movement of internal elements changed
    the focal length.

    We need to watch out for two terms that sound similar, but are NOT the
    same. First is the 'something X' zoom lens, such as a 3X zoom. This
    merely means that the longest focal length (most telephoto) is three
    times the shortest focal length (wide angle).

    There is another number, less often used, called magnification. This is
    the ratio of the focal length of a telephoto lens to the 'normal
    perspective' lens, about 50 mm on a 35 mm camera. It is somewhat related
    to the magnification of a pair of binoculars or a telescope. This
    number is NOT widely used in photography.

    So if an ad says 3X zoom lens, it means the ratio of the longest to
    shortest focal length of the zoom lens, and NOTHING about the
    magnification in the longest telephoto position.

    KyJim wrote:
    >
    > This question may have been answered before, but I'm new to this new "News
    > Group".
    >
    > I am going to purchase a Digital Camera in the next week. I am currently
    > leaning toward a Canon Digital Rebel (I current have a Rebel "G" 35mm)
    >
    > My question is how does optical zoom relate to a 35mm lens?
    >
    > Any suggestions on which camera is a good camera for novice wanting to get
    > to photography in his retirement will be greatly appreciated.
    >
    > Thank You...


    --
    Don Stauffer in Minnesota

    webpage- http://www.usfamily.net/web/stauffer
    Don Stauffer, Jan 28, 2004
    #9
  10. KyJim

    Don Stauffer Guest

    An optical 'zoom' lens works the same way regardless of which sort of
    camera it is on.

    Before zoom lenses, photographers with cameras that allowed
    interchangeable lenses needed to carry an assortment of lenses, usually
    at least three. A 'normal lens' of moderate focal length, a telephoto
    lens of long focal length, and a wide angle lens of very short focal
    length.

    When lens designers and manufacturers developed the first practical zoom
    lenses, these lenses combined a normal, a moderate wide angle, and a
    telephoto lens all in one lens. Movement of internal elements changed
    the focal length.

    We need to watch out for two terms that sound similar, but are NOT the
    same. First is the 'something X' zoom lens, such as a 3X zoom. This
    merely means that the longest focal length (most telephoto) is three
    times the shortest focal length (wide angle).

    There is another number, less often used, called magnification. This is
    the ratio of the focal length of a telephoto lens to the 'normal
    perspective' lens, about 50 mm on a 35 mm camera. It is somewhat related
    to the magnification of a pair of binoculars or a telescope. This
    number is NOT widely used in photography.

    So if an ad says 3X zoom lens, it means the ratio of the longest to
    shortest focal length of the zoom lens, and NOTHING about the
    magnification in the longest telephoto position.

    KyJim wrote:
    >
    > This question may have been answered before, but I'm new to this new "News
    > Group".
    >
    > I am going to purchase a Digital Camera in the next week. I am currently
    > leaning toward a Canon Digital Rebel (I current have a Rebel "G" 35mm)
    >
    > My question is how does optical zoom relate to a 35mm lens?
    >
    > Any suggestions on which camera is a good camera for novice wanting to get
    > to photography in his retirement will be greatly appreciated.
    >
    > Thank You...


    --
    Don Stauffer in Minnesota

    webpage- http://www.usfamily.net/web/stauffer
    Don Stauffer, Jan 28, 2004
    #10
  11. KyJim

    Don Stauffer Guest

    An optical 'zoom' lens works the same way regardless of which sort of
    camera it is on.

    Before zoom lenses, photographers with cameras that allowed
    interchangeable lenses needed to carry an assortment of lenses, usually
    at least three. A 'normal lens' of moderate focal length, a telephoto
    lens of long focal length, and a wide angle lens of very short focal
    length.

    When lens designers and manufacturers developed the first practical zoom
    lenses, these lenses combined a normal, a moderate wide angle, and a
    telephoto lens all in one lens. Movement of internal elements changed
    the focal length.

    We need to watch out for two terms that sound similar, but are NOT the
    same. First is the 'something X' zoom lens, such as a 3X zoom. This
    merely means that the longest focal length (most telephoto) is three
    times the shortest focal length (wide angle).

    There is another number, less often used, called magnification. This is
    the ratio of the focal length of a telephoto lens to the 'normal
    perspective' lens, about 50 mm on a 35 mm camera. It is somewhat related
    to the magnification of a pair of binoculars or a telescope. This
    number is NOT widely used in photography.

    So if an ad says 3X zoom lens, it means the ratio of the longest to
    shortest focal length of the zoom lens, and NOTHING about the
    magnification in the longest telephoto position.

    KyJim wrote:
    >
    > This question may have been answered before, but I'm new to this new "News
    > Group".
    >
    > I am going to purchase a Digital Camera in the next week. I am currently
    > leaning toward a Canon Digital Rebel (I current have a Rebel "G" 35mm)
    >
    > My question is how does optical zoom relate to a 35mm lens?
    >
    > Any suggestions on which camera is a good camera for novice wanting to get
    > to photography in his retirement will be greatly appreciated.
    >
    > Thank You...


    --
    Don Stauffer in Minnesota

    webpage- http://www.usfamily.net/web/stauffer
    Don Stauffer, Jan 28, 2004
    #11
  12. KyJim

    Don Stauffer Guest

    Sorry for the multiple reply. I was having troubles with my ISP's
    news/mail server.

    Don Stauffer wrote:
    >
    > An optical 'zoom' lens works the same way regardless of which sort of
    > camera it is on.
    >
    > Before zoom lenses, photographers with cameras that allowed
    > interchangeable lenses needed to carry an assortment of lenses, usually
    > at least three. A 'normal lens' of moderate focal length, a telephoto
    > lens of long focal length, and a wide angle lens of very short focal
    > length.
    >
    > When lens designers and manufacturers developed the first practical zoom
    > lenses, these lenses combined a normal, a moderate wide angle, and a
    > telephoto lens all in one lens. Movement of internal elements changed
    > the focal length.
    >
    > We need to watch out for two terms that sound similar, but are NOT the
    > same. First is the 'something X' zoom lens, such as a 3X zoom. This
    > merely means that the longest focal length (most telephoto) is three
    > times the shortest focal length (wide angle).
    >
    > There is another number, less often used, called magnification. This is
    > the ratio of the focal length of a telephoto lens to the 'normal
    > perspective' lens, about 50 mm on a 35 mm camera. It is somewhat related
    > to the magnification of a pair of binoculars or a telescope. This
    > number is NOT widely used in photography.
    >
    > So if an ad says 3X zoom lens, it means the ratio of the longest to
    > shortest focal length of the zoom lens, and NOTHING about the
    > magnification in the longest telephoto position.
    >
    > KyJim wrote:
    > >
    > > This question may have been answered before, but I'm new to this new "News
    > > Group".
    > >
    > > I am going to purchase a Digital Camera in the next week. I am currently
    > > leaning toward a Canon Digital Rebel (I current have a Rebel "G" 35mm)
    > >
    > > My question is how does optical zoom relate to a 35mm lens?
    > >
    > > Any suggestions on which camera is a good camera for novice wanting to get
    > > to photography in his retirement will be greatly appreciated.
    > >
    > > Thank You...

    >
    > --
    > Don Stauffer in Minnesota
    >
    > webpage- http://www.usfamily.net/web/stauffer


    --
    Don Stauffer in Minnesota

    webpage- http://www.usfamily.net/web/stauffer
    Don Stauffer, Jan 29, 2004
    #12
    1. Advertising

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