Opinions wanted on Cisco TAC and package help response times

Discussion in 'Cisco' started by Memnoch, May 18, 2004.

  1. Memnoch

    Memnoch Guest

    Just curious to see how long it is taking some of you to get a response back
    from Cisco when sending them an e-mail detailing a problem. The reason I ask
    is that at work we have had a few problems registering equipment bought
    through our supplier, who had decided to register them theirselves and made a
    hash of it. I send an e-mail off asking for assistance and in most cases it
    takes two weeks to get a useful reply!! To my mind this is totally
    unacceptable. Are we just unlucky or is this the norm? We are based in the UK
    by the way.
    Memnoch, May 18, 2004
    #1
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  2. In article <>,
    Memnoch <> wrote:
    :Just curious to see how long it is taking some of you to get a response back
    :from Cisco when sending them an e-mail detailing a problem. The reason I ask
    :is that at work we have had a few problems registering equipment bought
    :through our supplier, who had decided to register them theirselves and made a
    :hash of it. I send an e-mail off asking for assistance and in most cases it
    :takes two weeks to get a useful reply!!

    In our experience, the reply has come back within 2 days.

    The suppliers are -supposed- to register equipment these days. I've
    had a couple of mis-registrations that I wrote to Cisco about, and they
    were fixed next day.
    --
    Usenet is one of those "Good News/Bad News" comedy routines.
    Walter Roberson, May 18, 2004
    #2
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  3. Memnoch

    Memnoch Guest

    On 18 May 2004 19:32:29 GMT, -cnrc.gc.ca (Walter Roberson)
    wrote:

    >In article <>,
    >Memnoch <> wrote:
    >:Just curious to see how long it is taking some of you to get a response back
    >:from Cisco when sending them an e-mail detailing a problem. The reason I ask
    >:is that at work we have had a few problems registering equipment bought
    >:through our supplier, who had decided to register them theirselves and made a
    >:hash of it. I send an e-mail off asking for assistance and in most cases it
    >:takes two weeks to get a useful reply!!
    >
    >In our experience, the reply has come back within 2 days.


    Good to see someone is getting good support. That is definitely not what we
    are receiving here. I even received a couple of e-mails from the support
    person regarding two completely different calls, one in the USA and one in
    Germany. Perhaps they just have a bad batch of people at the moment.

    >The suppliers are -supposed- to register equipment these days. I've
    >had a couple of mis-registrations that I wrote to Cisco about, and they
    >were fixed next day.


    Again, we had to wait for over a week minimum to get any response from them at
    all. Very poor and hopefully we will get better support. We have already
    launched a complaint to our account manager and hopefully that will lead
    somewhere.
    Memnoch, May 19, 2004
    #3
  4. Memnoch

    AnyBody43 Guest

    Memnoch <>
    > On 18 May 2004 19:32:29 GMT, -cnrc.gc.ca (Walter Roberson)
    > wrote:
    >
    > >In article <>,
    > >Memnoch <> wrote:
    > >:Just curious to see how long it is taking some of you to get
    > >a response back
    > >:from Cisco when sending them an e-mail detailing a problem. The
    > >reason I ask
    > >:is that at work we have had a few problems registering equipment bought
    > >:through our supplier, who had decided to register them theirselves
    > >and made a
    > >:hash of it. I send an e-mail off asking for assistance and in most cases it
    > >:takes two weeks to get a useful reply!!
    > >
    > >In our experience, the reply has come back within 2 days.

    >
    > Good to see someone is getting good support. That is definitely not what we
    > are receiving here. I even received a couple of e-mails from the support
    > person regarding two completely different calls, one in the USA and one in
    > Germany. Perhaps they just have a bad batch of people at the moment.
    >
    > >The suppliers are -supposed- to register equipment these days. I've
    > >had a couple of mis-registrations that I wrote to Cisco about, and they
    > >were fixed next day.

    >
    > Again, we had to wait for over a week minimum to get any response from them at
    > all. Very poor and hopefully we will get better support. We have already
    > launched a complaint to our account manager and hopefully that will lead
    > somewhere.


    Is this a SUPPORT issue????

    I cannot resist commenting here even though I am not current with TAC.

    My experience has been that Cisco support is the best that I
    have ever known.

    The customer (3 years ago anyway) chooses the case priority
    from 1-4.

    A priority 1 case (as selected by the CUSTOMER) will be worked on
    by a cisco TAC person 24 hours a day 7 days a week until the
    issue is resolved to the CUSTOMERS satisfaction.

    However a priority 1 case is tested against a _network_ _down_
    _cannot_ _do_ _business_ situation. Also YOU THE CUSTOMER MUST match
    Cisco's comittment and provide 24x7 resources to work the problem
    through. TAC will ask you "what exactly is broken". If you say,
    my product registration is broken and I cannot do business
    then I guess TAC might not take you too seriously.

    GET REAL.

    Quite frankly, moaning that you are having to wait some days
    to register a product does not seem that significant. This is a
    low priority case (level 4). IIRC TAC work on level 4 cases as time
    permits and do not promise any time to resolution AT ALL. If
    your business truely does depend on a network, for example a
    bank that MUST provide certain information system functionality
    in order to meet regulatory requirements and do business - then
    I suggest that the system implementer should have organised
    product registration in good time. Otherwise, who cares?

    The Gold Partner that I used to work for in the UK would NEVER
    turn a customer with a problem away. If they had bought the stuff
    from us (and had purchased support?) we would fix it. If we needed
    to beat Cisco up to get it fixed we beat them up. The attitude
    was simply, MAKE THE CUSTOMER'S NETWORK WORK.

    I guess that if one was to choose to buy from support free
    channels then that is your business. Caveat emptor. If they
    are working on negligible margins then clearly your reseller
    can not help out very much. If you bought from the Gold Partner
    that I worked for, we comitted absolutely to making it all go.


    Finally:-

    The escalation path for a P1 case used to quite swiftly end at the
    CEO. I cannot recall the details now but I think that it might
    have been as little as 24 hours. The sting in the tail however
    is that if TAC call you and you do not answer your phone then
    clearly the case is not P1 to you and therefore not to Cisco
    either. Instant downgrade to "normal business hours" working.
    If you REALLY NEED it fixed and it really is broken then the
    resources are (were?) there.

    PS

    To assist in your enlightenment I have located the TAC priority
    definitions for you.

    http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products...ng_started_guide09186a00800b0176.html#1002452

    Says:

    TAC Case Priority Definitions
    To ensure that all cases are reported in a standard format, Cisco has
    established case priority definitions.

    Priority 1 (P1)—Your network is "down" or there is a critical impact
    to your business operations. You and Cisco will commit all necessary
    resources around the clock to resolve the situation.

    Priority 2 (P2)—Operation of an existing network is severely degraded,
    or significant aspects of your business operation are negatively
    affected by inadequate performance of Cisco products. You and Cisco
    will commit full-time resources during normal business hours to
    resolve the situation.

    Priority 3 (P3)—Operational performance of your network is impaired,
    but most business operations remain functional. You and Cisco will
    commit resources during normal business hours to restore service to
    satisfactory levels.

    Priority 4 (P4)—You require information or assistance with Cisco
    product capabilities, installation, or configuration. There is little
    or no effect on your business operations.


    Don't get me wrong it is far from perfect, but I think that they are
    trying to, and compared to anyone else, do actually provide, an
    excellent
    service.
    AnyBody43, May 20, 2004
    #4
  5. In article <>,
    AnyBody43 <> wrote:
    :Quite frankly, moaning that you are having to wait some days
    :to register a product does not seem that significant. This is a
    :low priority case (level 4). IIRC TAC work on level 4 cases as time
    :permits and do not promise any time to resolution AT ALL. If
    :your business truely does depend on a network, for example a
    :bank that MUST provide certain information system functionality
    :in order to meet regulatory requirements and do business - then
    :I suggest that the system implementer should have organised
    :product registration in good time. Otherwise, who cares?

    You presume that the systems implementer had a choice in the matter.

    Things are run differently at different places. At my work, the
    biggest Cisco device that I can purchase (complete with 1 year minimal
    support) under my authorized limits, is a "PIX 501 3DES Bundle".
    Anything beyond that has to go to a vote of my management. And if the
    item is bigger than a PIX 501 with 50 user license, then I have one
    opportunity per year to plead for a share of the budget fund that
    has to be used, and at the time of that plea, I have to fully justify
    the request and have it fully costed (even if the device won't be
    needed for another 10 months and the pricing hasn't even been set up
    by the manufacturer.)

    One can only do a certain amount of planning ahead. If the requirements
    change during the year -- well, I'm suppose to anticipate that
    requirements may change and find out from the users ahead of time
    what -could- happen and budget for that... and yet still be able to
    justify every funding request as being -definitely- needed.
    "We have no evidence that there are any problems, but Hey! You Never
    Know" is not considered sufficient justification for allocating funds.

    Net result: equipment sometimes has to be purchased and put in place
    ASAP after the money can be scraped together for it and management
    can do their approval magic and our suppliers can deliver it. The
    systems implimenter is sometimes structurally constrained against being
    -able- to organize product registration "in good time". Don't confuse
    "implimenter" with "authorized spender".
    --
    Entropy is the logarithm of probability -- Boltzmann
    Walter Roberson, May 20, 2004
    #5
  6. Memnoch

    AnyBody43 Guest

    -cnrc.gc.ca (Walter Roberson) wrote in message news:<c8io0u$1ab$>...
    > In article <>,
    > AnyBody43 <> wrote:
    > :Quite frankly, moaning that you are having to wait some days
    > :to register a product does not seem that significant. This is a
    > :low priority case (level 4). IIRC TAC work on level 4 cases as time
    > :permits and do not promise any time to resolution AT ALL. If
    > :your business truely does depend on a network, for example a
    > :bank that MUST provide certain information system functionality
    > :in order to meet regulatory requirements and do business - then
    > :I suggest that the system implementer should have organised
    > :product registration in good time. Otherwise, who cares?
    >
    > You presume that the systems implementer had a choice in the matter.
    >
    > Things are run differently at different places. At my work, the
    > biggest Cisco device that I can purchase (complete with 1 year minimal
    > support) under my authorized limits, is a "PIX 501 3DES Bundle".
    > Anything beyond that has to go to a vote of my management. And if the
    > item is bigger than a PIX 501 with 50 user license, then I have one
    > opportunity per year to plead for a share of the budget fund that
    > has to be used, and at the time of that plea, I have to fully justify
    > the request and have it fully costed (even if the device won't be
    > needed for another 10 months and the pricing hasn't even been set up
    > by the manufacturer.)
    >
    > One can only do a certain amount of planning ahead. If the requirements
    > change during the year -- well, I'm suppose to anticipate that
    > requirements may change and find out from the users ahead of time
    > what -could- happen and budget for that... and yet still be able to
    > justify every funding request as being -definitely- needed.
    > "We have no evidence that there are any problems, but Hey! You Never
    > Know" is not considered sufficient justification for allocating funds.
    >
    > Net result: equipment sometimes has to be purchased and put in place
    > ASAP after the money can be scraped together for it and management
    > can do their approval magic and our suppliers can deliver it. The
    > systems implimenter is sometimes structurally constrained against being
    > -able- to organize product registration "in good time". Don't confuse
    > "implimenter" with "authorized spender".


    Hi,

    I was a bit OTT with the message, sorry everyone.
    It was 2am and I had had a few beers:)

    I agree that there is no good reason for not being able to complete
    registration in pretty short order.

    It is not a Technical Support matter but it is a Support
    matter. At the time I failed to make the distinction.
    AnyBody43, May 21, 2004
    #6
  7. Memnoch

    vishnuasok

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2011
    Messages:
    1
    Cisco TAC is well known for its timely and effective support. For all P1 and P2's you normally get response almost immediately. For P3 and P4 you can expect a response in an hour ideally.

    Whenever you open a TAC case , make sure that you specify the current network impact so that the Engineers can classify the urgency correctly.
    vishnuasok, Nov 16, 2011
    #7
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