Online Hi-Def vs. Blu-Ray

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by Just Visiting, Feb 16, 2008.

  1. Well, here we go again! This format war should be more interesting
    than the last one. Since online video has exploded in the last couple
    of years, anyone can save their favorite movies and clips to any media
    they want. The movie studios will probably require registration per
    movie per IP address. Toshiba could still offer a hardware solution
    for this market though. The cable, phone and satellite companies will
    make out with this one, too. However, somebody will still offer a
    retail or mail order movie business if the studios are willing to
    license their material on various types of media versus online
    distribution. It doesn't have to be limited to Blu-Ray with the
    threat of hi-def online content. For the consumer, it has to be an
    offer that will last for many years to come. Isn't competition great?
    Hee-hee...
    Just Visiting, Feb 16, 2008
    #1
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  2. Just Visiting

    T.B. Guest

    "Just Visiting" farted:

    > Well, here we go again! This format war should be more interesting
    > than the last one.


    This "format war" is over.

    > Since online video has exploded in the last couple
    > of years, anyone can save their favorite movies and clips to any media
    > they want.


    Yeah, I love that overly compressed junk being peddled as HD programming.
    Or better yet, squinting to view postage stamp sized clips on my iPod or
    cell phone. On line video has years to go before it'll match the quality
    *and* ease of access simply buying a HD title in a store. Newsflash, people
    have been able to record video from tv on vhs tapes for decades and that
    didn't stop pre-recorded vhs tapes, laserdiscs and dvds from being a huge
    part of the home video marketplace.

    > The movie studios will probably require registration per
    > movie per IP address. Toshiba could still offer a hardware solution
    > for this market though.


    Heh, if they're still around in a few years. They're going to take a *huge*
    loss throwing all their marbles into the obviously failed HD-DVD format.

    As for anyone whining about shit like per-view "registration" or any other
    draconian measures to control content viewing, there's always going to be
    hacks and workarounds even if studios figure some way to make it happen (how
    are you going to watch a video on say, your laptop on an airplane?) just
    like there's been for every format and region restriction thus far. I
    imagine the same lame argument was going around in the early 80's when
    people wondered how they'd ever make perfect copies of cds.

    > The cable, phone and satellite companies will
    > make out with this one, too. However, somebody will still offer a
    > retail or mail order movie business if the studios are willing to
    > license their material on various types of media versus online
    > distribution. It doesn't have to be limited to Blu-Ray with the
    > threat of hi-def online content. For the consumer, it has to be an
    > offer that will last for many years to come. Isn't competition great?
    > Hee-hee...


    Yeah, it weeded out an inferior product (HD-DVD) in record time, just like
    it did with UMDs, CEDs and loads of other redunant formats.

    Hee-hee...

    T.B.
    T.B., Feb 16, 2008
    #2
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  3. Just Visiting

    flambe Guest

    Being a curmudgeon is one thing, seeing where things are headed is another.
    As the internet pipeline widens nearly all content delivery will move there,
    particularly the delivery of pre-recorded materials.
    DVD has made inroads in portable devices but the market will move to an ipod
    style download model over the long term, as will what people now regard as
    OTA/Cable/Satellite television.
    Unfortunately in the rush to move to this model consumers will have to
    endure compression schemes as bad or worse than what we are now seeing.
    However as bandwidth increases this will improve if consumers demand it:
    alas most consumers are morons.
    flambe, Feb 16, 2008
    #3
  4. Just Visiting

    FDR Guest

    T.B. wrote:
    > "Just Visiting" farted:
    >
    >> Well, here we go again! This format war should be more interesting
    >> than the last one.

    >
    > This "format war" is over.
    >
    >> Since online video has exploded in the last couple
    >> of years, anyone can save their favorite movies and clips to any media
    >> they want.

    >
    > Yeah, I love that overly compressed junk being peddled as HD
    > programming. Or better yet, squinting to view postage stamp sized clips
    > on my iPod or cell phone. On line video has years to go before it'll
    > match the quality *and* ease of access simply buying a HD title in a
    > store.


    Let's see. People sitting at home right now can press a few buttons and
    have the HD movie running in a matter of minutes, whereas you have to
    drive to a store, peruse the differing Blu Ray players, pick out a
    movie, then come home and hook it all up 2 hours later. Yeah, I could
    see how Blu Ray has that ease of access thing covered.

    Newsflash, people have been able to record video from tv on vhs
    > tapes for decades and that didn't stop pre-recorded vhs tapes,
    > laserdiscs and dvds from being a huge part of the home video marketplace.
    >
    >> The movie studios will probably require registration per
    >> movie per IP address. Toshiba could still offer a hardware solution
    >> for this market though.

    >
    > Heh, if they're still around in a few years. They're going to take a
    > *huge* loss throwing all their marbles into the obviously failed HD-DVD
    > format.
    >
    > As for anyone whining about shit like per-view "registration" or any
    > other draconian measures to control content viewing, there's always
    > going to be hacks and workarounds even if studios figure some way to
    > make it happen (how are you going to watch a video on say, your laptop
    > on an airplane?) just like there's been for every format and region
    > restriction thus far. I imagine the same lame argument was going around
    > in the early 80's when people wondered how they'd ever make perfect
    > copies of cds.


    HDDVD has a hack already.

    >
    >> The cable, phone and satellite companies will
    >> make out with this one, too. However, somebody will still offer a
    >> retail or mail order movie business if the studios are willing to
    >> license their material on various types of media versus online
    >> distribution. It doesn't have to be limited to Blu-Ray with the
    >> threat of hi-def online content. For the consumer, it has to be an
    >> offer that will last for many years to come. Isn't competition great?
    >> Hee-hee...

    >
    > Yeah, it weeded out an inferior product (HD-DVD) in record time, just
    > like it did with UMDs, CEDs and loads of other redunant formats.
    >
    > Hee-hee...
    >
    > T.B.
    >
    >
    FDR, Feb 16, 2008
    #4
  5. Just Visiting

    FDR Guest

    flambe wrote:
    > Being a curmudgeon is one thing, seeing where things are headed is another.
    > As the internet pipeline widens nearly all content delivery will move there,
    > particularly the delivery of pre-recorded materials.
    > DVD has made inroads in portable devices but the market will move to an ipod
    > style download model over the long term, as will what people now regard as
    > OTA/Cable/Satellite television.
    > Unfortunately in the rush to move to this model consumers will have to
    > endure compression schemes as bad or worse than what we are now seeing.
    > However as bandwidth increases this will improve if consumers demand it:
    > alas most consumers are morons.
    >
    >


    Wait until your pc becomes a cheap applicance where nearly all programs
    will be run from a remote server. Yourhard drive will be just a
    redundant back up drive.
    FDR, Feb 16, 2008
    #5
  6. Just Visiting

    T.B. Guest

    "FDR" sez:

    > T.B. wrote:
    >> "Just Visiting" farted:
    >>
    >>> Well, here we go again! This format war should be more interesting
    >>> than the last one.

    >>
    >> This "format war" is over.
    >>
    >>> Since online video has exploded in the last couple
    >>> of years, anyone can save their favorite movies and clips to any media
    >>> they want.

    >>
    >> Yeah, I love that overly compressed junk being peddled as HD programming.
    >> Or better yet, squinting to view postage stamp sized clips on my iPod or
    >> cell phone. On line video has years to go before it'll match the quality
    >> *and* ease of access simply buying a HD title in a store.

    >
    > Let's see. People sitting at home right now can press a few buttons and
    > have the HD movie running in a matter of minutes, whereas you have to
    > drive to a store, peruse the differing Blu Ray players, pick out a movie,
    > then come home and hook it all up 2 hours later. Yeah, I could see how
    > Blu Ray has that ease of access thing covered.


    Did you have this problem when you bought your first dvd player? Did you
    wait a decade or so after vhs players and tapes first hit the consumer
    market because you could still watch uncut movies on cable?

    I can go into a local video store and chose from thousands of titles for a
    few bucks rental. I can flip though channels or use ppv and have a couple
    hundred options if I'm lucky. And that's standard def content. HD content
    is still a drop in the bucket percentage-wise for either hard disc or online
    options. And I don't know about you, but I don't buy a "player" every time
    I go out to buy a new disc.

    Then there's the quality issue. You show me where I can get instant access
    to a movie with audio and video quality that matches a blu-ray disc.

    This entertainment utopia of the general public flicking their remote and
    custom ordering and watching HD content with hundreds of thousands of
    choices is a *long* way off. Decades. It's blind arrogance that every Joe
    Sixpack will have the kind of internet/cable setup even a decade from now to
    make hard media content obsolete. Right now, the percentage of people
    downloading or ordering *any* quality theatrical releases online or through
    their tv subscription service in a fraction of the number of people who buy
    or rent hard media product. Like I said, dvds managed to be successful and
    a huge income generater for studios when matched against the cable/satellite
    boom of the past 20 years and hidef hard media will likewise thrive for some
    time to come as an option against HD programming as well.

    T.B.
    T.B., Feb 16, 2008
    #6
  7. Just Visiting

    Peter A Guest

    In article <47b728bb$0$6150$>,
    says...

    > Let's see. People sitting at home right now can press a few buttons and
    > have the HD movie running in a matter of minutes,


    What's the rush? Most people get over instant gratification by the time
    they are 10 years old.

    > whereas you have to
    > drive to a store, peruse the differing Blu Ray players


    Oh, I didn't realize I have to buy a new Blu-Ray player every time I
    want to watch a movie. Silly me, I thought I could use the one I already
    have.

    > pick out a movie.


    I pick from the 4-6 NetFlix movies I have at any one time and the half-
    dozen or so I have recorded off cable using my DVR.



    --
    Peter Aitken
    Peter A, Feb 16, 2008
    #7
  8. Just Visiting

    FDR Guest

    Peter A wrote:
    > In article <47b728bb$0$6150$>,
    > says...
    >
    >> Let's see. People sitting at home right now can press a few buttons and
    >> have the HD movie running in a matter of minutes,

    >
    > What's the rush? Most people get over instant gratification by the time
    > they are 10 years old.


    Yeah, I can see that's why businesses have abandoned the fax, the
    internet, email, Blackberries, FedEx overnight etc. Instant
    gratification is the norm now, not the exception.


    >
    >> whereas you have to
    >> drive to a store, peruse the differing Blu Ray players

    >
    > Oh, I didn't realize I have to buy a new Blu-Ray player every time I
    > want to watch a movie. Silly me, I thought I could use the one I already
    > have.


    Joe consumer will look at having to spend time finding an acceptable
    player, or using the one that's in their home already. Which one wins
    for ease of use? The one right in front of you or the one it takes time
    to investigate and buy?

    >
    >> pick out a movie.

    >
    > I pick from the 4-6 NetFlix movies I have at any one time and the half-
    > dozen or so I have recorded off cable using my DVR.


    Netflix Blu Ray titles have to come through the mail. Oh wait, that
    takes time. Or they hit the few buttons on their cable providers box
    and it's there. Ease of use?
    FDR, Feb 16, 2008
    #8
  9. Just Visiting

    FDR Guest

    T.B. wrote:
    > "FDR" sez:
    >
    >> T.B. wrote:
    >>> "Just Visiting" farted:
    >>>
    >>>> Well, here we go again! This format war should be more interesting
    >>>> than the last one.
    >>>
    >>> This "format war" is over.
    >>>
    >>>> Since online video has exploded in the last couple
    >>>> of years, anyone can save their favorite movies and clips to any media
    >>>> they want.
    >>>
    >>> Yeah, I love that overly compressed junk being peddled as HD
    >>> programming. Or better yet, squinting to view postage stamp sized
    >>> clips on my iPod or cell phone. On line video has years to go before
    >>> it'll match the quality *and* ease of access simply buying a HD title
    >>> in a store.

    >>
    >> Let's see. People sitting at home right now can press a few buttons
    >> and have the HD movie running in a matter of minutes, whereas you have
    >> to drive to a store, peruse the differing Blu Ray players, pick out a
    >> movie, then come home and hook it all up 2 hours later. Yeah, I could
    >> see how Blu Ray has that ease of access thing covered.

    >
    > Did you have this problem when you bought your first dvd player? Did you
    > wait a decade or so after vhs players and tapes first hit the consumer
    > market because you could still watch uncut movies on cable?
    >
    > I can go into a local video store and chose from thousands of titles for
    > a few bucks rental.


    There's thousands of Blu Ray titles at your store. Wow.

    The discussion started not about DVD's, it's about the ease of use of HD
    content.


    I can flip though channels or use ppv and have a
    > couple hundred options if I'm lucky. And that's standard def content.
    > HD content is still a drop in the bucket percentage-wise for either hard
    > disc or online options. And I don't know about you, but I don't buy a
    > "player" every time I go out to buy a new disc.


    No, but Joe consumer has the choice of an already installed device or
    one they have to spend a lot of money for, a fair amount of time
    deciding on, and installation time. For some people they don't mind the
    money and time. For a lot others it's easier access that wins them.

    >
    > Then there's the quality issue. You show me where I can get instant
    > access to a movie with audio and video quality that matches a blu-ray disc.


    Shrugs. Go buy a Blu Ray disk. It's your money. Joe consumer will see
    HD on their cable tv providers box and think it's just wonderful. Do
    you think they are going to start A/B testing and such? A lot of people
    don't even bother with their tv's factory settings. Joe Consumer: "Hmm,
    let's see Cinema or Sports, well I'll pick Cinema since the tv company
    knows what's best for me"

    >
    > This entertainment utopia of the general public flicking their remote
    > and custom ordering and watching HD content with hundreds of thousands
    > of choices is a *long* way off. Decades.


    Right now Blu Ray doesn't have that kind of lineup but you seem to think
    cable companies should.

    A few years ago I would have been surprised to see HD being offered on
    my cable company, now there's lots of it.


    It's blind arrogance that
    > every Joe Sixpack will have the kind of internet/cable setup even a
    > decade from now to make hard media content obsolete. Right now, the
    > percentage of people downloading or ordering *any* quality theatrical
    > releases online or through their tv subscription service in a fraction
    > of the number of people who buy or rent hard media product. Like I
    > said, dvds managed to be successful and a huge income generater for
    > studios when matched against the cable/satellite boom of the past 20
    > years and hidef hard media will likewise thrive for some time to come as
    > an option against HD programming as well.


    What makes the DVD sales is the ubiquitous nature of players. Cars come
    with them. Hey, going on a long trip, let's buy a few DVDs and play
    them in the car. Oh, wait until they put Blu Ray players in cars.
    Well, yeah, I can see that big difference you'll see on the 7 inch
    screen overhead through the stock radio system. Blu Ray (or if was HDVD
    that won) will rule with big screens no doubt, especially with high tech
    fans. But anything below 42 inches and the distinction will become
    difficult to see versus a DVD or cable source.


    >
    > T.B.
    FDR, Feb 16, 2008
    #9
  10. Just Visiting

    Rod Speed Guest

    FDR <> wrote:
    > flambe wrote:
    >> Being a curmudgeon is one thing, seeing where things are headed is
    >> another. As the internet pipeline widens nearly all content delivery
    >> will move there, particularly the delivery of pre-recorded materials.
    >> DVD has made inroads in portable devices but the market will move to
    >> an ipod style download model over the long term, as will what people
    >> now regard as OTA/Cable/Satellite television.
    >> Unfortunately in the rush to move to this model consumers will have
    >> to endure compression schemes as bad or worse than what we are now
    >> seeing. However as bandwidth increases this will improve if
    >> consumers demand it: alas most consumers are morons.


    > Wait until your pc becomes a cheap applicance where nearly all
    > programs will be run from a remote server. Yourhard drive will be
    > just a redundant back up drive.


    Taint gunna happen, you watch.
    Rod Speed, Feb 16, 2008
    #10
  11. FDR wrote:
    > T.B. wrote:
    >>
    >> Yeah, I love that overly compressed junk being peddled as HD
    >> programming. Or better yet, squinting to view postage stamp sized
    >> clips on my iPod or cell phone. On line video has years to go before
    >> it'll match the quality *and* ease of access simply buying a HD title
    >> in a store.

    >
    > Let's see. People sitting at home right now can press a few buttons and
    > have the HD movie running in a matter of minutes


    <plfft!> ...WHERE?? 0_0

    Oh, sorry, thought we were talking about online downloads.
    If you're talking about cable/satellite, it's been around for twenty
    years, and disk makers are still sleeping safely at night.

    > whereas you have to
    > drive to a store, peruse the differing Blu Ray players, pick out a
    > movie, then come home and hook it all up 2 hours later. Yeah, I could
    > see how Blu Ray has that ease of access thing covered.


    Um, show of hands, anyone who's even *walked in* to a Blockbuster, two
    months after Netflix?
    No, literally--You just can't walk in, anymore! The old urges are GONE!

    Derek Janssen
    Derek Janssen, Feb 16, 2008
    #11
  12. Just Visiting

    FDR Guest

    Rod Speed wrote:
    > FDR <> wrote:
    >> flambe wrote:
    >>> Being a curmudgeon is one thing, seeing where things are headed is
    >>> another. As the internet pipeline widens nearly all content delivery
    >>> will move there, particularly the delivery of pre-recorded materials.
    >>> DVD has made inroads in portable devices but the market will move to
    >>> an ipod style download model over the long term, as will what people
    >>> now regard as OTA/Cable/Satellite television.
    >>> Unfortunately in the rush to move to this model consumers will have
    >>> to endure compression schemes as bad or worse than what we are now
    >>> seeing. However as bandwidth increases this will improve if
    >>> consumers demand it: alas most consumers are morons.

    >
    >> Wait until your pc becomes a cheap applicance where nearly all
    >> programs will be run from a remote server. Yourhard drive will be
    >> just a redundant back up drive.

    >
    > Taint gunna happen, you watch.
    >
    >


    I'd like to believe it won't. But big companies who are tired of piracy
    will resort to this.
    FDR, Feb 16, 2008
    #12
  13. Just Visiting

    RickH Guest

    On Feb 16, 10:40 am, Just Visiting <>
    wrote:
    > Well, here we go again! This format war should be more interesting
    > than the last one.  Since online video has exploded in the last couple
    > of years, anyone can save their favorite movies and clips to any media
    > they want. The movie studios will probably require registration per
    > movie per IP address.  Toshiba could still offer a hardware solution
    > for this market though.  The cable, phone and satellite companies will
    > make out with this one, too.  However, somebody will still offer a
    > retail or mail order movie business if the studios are willing to
    > license their material on various types of media versus online
    > distribution.  It doesn't have to be limited to Blu-Ray with the
    > threat of hi-def online content. For the consumer, it has to be an
    > offer that will last for many years to come.  Isn't competition great?
    > Hee-hee...


    People largely have accepted lossy compression in music files in the
    form of mp3 files, they will also accept lossy compressed video on
    demand. You better believe the studios will insist on lossy
    compression for downloaded content.
    RickH, Feb 16, 2008
    #13
  14. Just Visiting

    FDR Guest

    Derek Janssen wrote:
    > FDR wrote:
    >> T.B. wrote:
    >>>
    >>> Yeah, I love that overly compressed junk being peddled as HD
    >>> programming. Or better yet, squinting to view postage stamp sized
    >>> clips on my iPod or cell phone. On line video has years to go before
    >>> it'll match the quality *and* ease of access simply buying a HD title
    >>> in a store.

    >>
    >> Let's see. People sitting at home right now can press a few buttons
    >> and have the HD movie running in a matter of minutes

    >
    > <plfft!> ...WHERE?? 0_0
    >
    > Oh, sorry, thought we were talking about online downloads.
    > If you're talking about cable/satellite, it's been around for twenty
    > years, and disk makers are still sleeping safely at night.
    >
    >> whereas you have to drive to a store, peruse the differing Blu Ray
    >> players, pick out a movie, then come home and hook it all up 2 hours
    >> later. Yeah, I could see how Blu Ray has that ease of access thing
    >> covered.

    >
    > Um, show of hands, anyone who's even *walked in* to a Blockbuster, two
    > months after Netflix?
    > No, literally--You just can't walk in, anymore! The old urges are GONE!


    Oddly they sell DVD's everywhere. And they have rental kiosks in a lot
    of places. IF Netflix was the end all of DVD rentals, we wouldn't have
    those situations.


    >
    > Derek Janssen
    >
    FDR, Feb 16, 2008
    #14
  15. Just Visiting

    FDR Guest

    RickH wrote:
    > On Feb 16, 10:40 am, Just Visiting <>
    > wrote:
    >> Well, here we go again! This format war should be more interesting
    >> than the last one. Since online video has exploded in the last couple
    >> of years, anyone can save their favorite movies and clips to any media
    >> they want. The movie studios will probably require registration per
    >> movie per IP address. Toshiba could still offer a hardware solution
    >> for this market though. The cable, phone and satellite companies will
    >> make out with this one, too. However, somebody will still offer a
    >> retail or mail order movie business if the studios are willing to
    >> license their material on various types of media versus online
    >> distribution. It doesn't have to be limited to Blu-Ray with the
    >> threat of hi-def online content. For the consumer, it has to be an
    >> offer that will last for many years to come. Isn't competition great?
    >> Hee-hee...

    >
    > People largely have accepted lossy compression in music files in the
    > form of mp3 files, they will also accept lossy compressed video on
    > demand. You better believe the studios will insist on lossy
    > compression for downloaded content.
    >
    >


    Exactly. A generation raised on crappy MP3's, crappy players, and
    crappy 3 inch screens on their portable players. And somehow people
    here think that HD players will make people orgasm versus DVD's.
    FDR, Feb 16, 2008
    #15
  16. FDR wrote:
    >>
    >> Um, show of hands, anyone who's even *walked in* to a Blockbuster, two
    >> months after Netflix?
    >> No, literally--You just can't walk in, anymore! The old urges are GONE!

    >
    > Oddly they sell DVD's everywhere. And they have rental kiosks in a lot
    > of places. IF Netflix was the end all of DVD rentals, we wouldn't have
    > those situations.


    And if it wasn't, two other chains would still be in business today, and
    Blockbuster wouldn't be spending half their cash trying to figure out
    their own mail-rental service.

    Derek Janssen (oh, wait, I know--It was the DOWNLOADS that killed them!)
    Derek Janssen, Feb 16, 2008
    #16
  17. On Sat, 16 Feb 2008 09:56:40 -0800, "flambe" <> wrote:

    >Being a curmudgeon is one thing, seeing where things are headed is another.
    >As the internet pipeline widens nearly all content delivery will move there,
    >particularly the delivery of pre-recorded materials.


    You're an idiot. Packaged IP products will be around for a LONG time.

    >DVD has made inroads in portable devices but the market will move to an ipod
    >style download model over the long term, as will what people now regard as
    >OTA/Cable/Satellite television.


    Which will NOT be hi-def in any way shape or form.

    >Unfortunately in the rush to move to this model consumers will have to
    >endure compression schemes as bad or worse than what we are now seeing.


    Wrong again. Smart consumers do not "have to endure" a godaamned thing.

    >However as bandwidth increases this will improve if consumers demand it:
    >alas most consumers are morons.
    >

    You are a fucking moron. If you had any brains, YOU would organize to
    educate consumers and make what we get what we want the first time out,
    but you apparently would rather called most of the world "morons".

    To me, that makes you the fucking retard on this bus, Bozo.
    StickThatInYourPipeAndSmokeIt, Feb 16, 2008
    #17
  18. On Sat, 16 Feb 2008 16:40:13 GMT, Just Visiting
    <> wrote:

    >Well, here we go again! This format war should be more interesting
    >than the last one. Since online video has exploded in the last couple
    >of years, anyone can save their favorite movies and clips to any media
    >they want.


    You're an idiot! Those of us using hi-def formats do not want some
    stupid, down-res'd crap in any form from any source, you fucking retard.

    > The movie studios will probably require registration per
    >movie per IP address.


    You're an idiot. The database to carry that much info alone would be
    far too costly. That will certainly NOT be the way such a thing as
    online feeds are handled.

    > Toshiba could still offer a hardware solution
    >for this market though.


    As if an idiot like you would even know.

    > The cable, phone and satellite companies will
    >make out with this one, too. However, somebody will still offer a
    >retail or mail order movie business if the studios are willing to
    >license their material on various types of media versus online
    >distribution.


    You are truly stupid. media servers already exist, and have already
    stood the test of the courtroom.

    > It doesn't have to be limited to Blu-Ray with the
    >threat of hi-def online content.


    There is no such threat, idiot.

    > For the consumer, it has to be an
    >offer that will last for many years to come.


    Is that what caused you to fail at being a nappy headed ho?

    > Isn't competition great?
    >Hee-hee...


    Aren't you stupid? heeheehee.
    ChairmanOfTheBored, Feb 16, 2008
    #18
  19. Just Visiting

    Guest Guest

    "FDR" <> wrote in message news:47b75a41$0$30716$...
    > RickH wrote:
    > > On Feb 16, 10:40 am, Just Visiting <>
    > > wrote:
    > >> Well, here we go again! This format war should be more interesting
    > >> than the last one. Since online video has exploded in the last couple
    > >> of years, anyone can save their favorite movies and clips to any media
    > >> they want. The movie studios will probably require registration per
    > >> movie per IP address. Toshiba could still offer a hardware solution
    > >> for this market though. The cable, phone and satellite companies will
    > >> make out with this one, too. However, somebody will still offer a
    > >> retail or mail order movie business if the studios are willing to
    > >> license their material on various types of media versus online
    > >> distribution. It doesn't have to be limited to Blu-Ray with the
    > >> threat of hi-def online content. For the consumer, it has to be an
    > >> offer that will last for many years to come. Isn't competition great?
    > >> Hee-hee...

    > >
    > > People largely have accepted lossy compression in music files in the
    > > form of mp3 files, they will also accept lossy compressed video on
    > > demand. You better believe the studios will insist on lossy
    > > compression for downloaded content.
    > >
    > >

    >
    > Exactly. A generation raised on crappy MP3's, crappy players, and
    > crappy 3 inch screens on their portable players. And somehow people
    > here think that HD players will make people orgasm versus DVD's.


    Ain't it the truth.

    I'd like to know how relevant this format war is, when the content itself
    is absolute crap. Half my friends no longer even own TV sets, and the
    most recent film I have in my video library (of ~800 titles) was produced
    15 years ago. As for cable, in my lineup of 75 channels, the best thing
    on TV is usually "Match Game '73".
    Guest, Feb 16, 2008
    #19
  20. Just Visiting

    Rod Speed Guest

    FDR <> wrote
    > Rod Speed wrote
    >> FDR <> wrote
    >>> flambe wrote


    >>>> Being a curmudgeon is one thing, seeing where things are headed is another. As the internet pipeline widens nearly
    >>>> all content
    >>>> delivery will move there, particularly the delivery of pre-recorded materials. DVD has made inroads in portable
    >>>> devices but the market will move to an ipod style download model over the long term, as will what people now regard
    >>>> as OTA/Cable/Satellite television.


    >>>> Unfortunately in the rush to move to this model consumers will have
    >>>> to endure compression schemes as bad or worse than what we are now seeing. However as bandwidth increases this will
    >>>> improve if
    >>>> consumers demand it: alas most consumers are morons.


    >>> Wait until your pc becomes a cheap applicance where nearly all
    >>> programs will be run from a remote server. Yourhard drive will be
    >>> just a redundant back up drive.


    >> Taint gunna happen, you watch.


    > I'd like to believe it won't.


    I know it wont.

    > But big companies who are tired of piracy will resort to this.


    Nope, because the end users wont wear not being able to use it unless they are online.
    Rod Speed, Feb 16, 2008
    #20
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