One router / 2 WANs / Load balancing and Failover - HOW?

Discussion in 'Cisco' started by Stuart, Feb 26, 2007.

  1. Stuart

    Stuart Guest

    To whom it may concern or can help:

    The available hardware is a Cisco 7505 with an RSP-4 256MB RAM/32MB
    Flash Card. The goal is to (for the moment) setup load balancing and
    failover with one router. For the moment, I would request that we skip
    over the "one router debate" no matter how religiously you feel about
    it.

    This what I am trying to get to as an end state:

    LAN #1 / Subnet #1: 192.168.254.0
    192.168.254.1 IP Address of FastEthernet0/0 Port on the 7505
    192.168.254.2 Server #1
    192.168.254.3 Workstation #1

    FastEthernet0/0 plugs into a Cisco Hub/Switch which has the ".2" and ".
    3" machines plugged into it
    Each Server and Workstation has a gateway address 192.168.254.1

    LAN #2 / Subnet #2: 192.168.2.0 (FastEthernet0/1 on 7505)
    192.168.2.1 IP Address of FastEthernet0/1 Port on the 7505
    192.168.2.2 Server #2
    192.168.2.3 Workstation #2
    192.168.2.4 Workstation #3

    FastEthernet0/1 plugs into a Cisco Hub/Switch whas has the ".2", ".3",
    and ".4" machines plugged into it
    Each Server and Workstation has a gateway address of 192.168.2.1

    WAN #1 / Subnet #3: 192.168.1.0
    192.168.1.2 IP Address of FastEthernet1/0 Port on the 7505 (static
    definition, not a DHCP client)
    192.168.1.1 IP Address of the DSL Modem (the DSL Modem does NAT
    between it and the Internet)

    WAN #2 / Subnet #4: 192.168.3.0
    192.168.3.2 IP Address of FastEthernet1/1 Port on the 7505 (static
    definition, not a DHCP client)
    192.168.3.1 IP Address of the Cable Modem (the Cable Modem does
    Nat between it and the Internet)

    How can I configure the 7505 such that following are true:

    How do I accomplish Scenario #1:

    LAN #1 default routes it's non 254.0 subnet traffic to WAN #1
    LAN #2 default routes it's non 2.0 subnet traffic to WAN #2

    If WAN #1 fails, LAN #1 automatically will route its non 254.0 traffic
    to WAN #2
    if WAN #2 fails, LAN #2 automatically will route it's non 2.0 traffic
    to WAN #1

    How do I accomplish Scenario #2:

    LAN #1 and LAN #2 route to WAN #1 and WAN #2 using load balancing, and
    if either WAN #1 or WAN #2 fails, traffic continues to flow to the
    surviving interface until such time as the failing WAN connection
    comes back online, and compels the router to revert back to a load
    balancing state.

    Ideas? Please provide examples if you can, and recommendations as to
    the features in an IOS which would be needed in order to support a
    configuration in pursuit of this.


    Stuart
     
    Stuart, Feb 26, 2007
    #1
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  2. Stuart

    Trendkill Guest

    On 26 Feb, 13:02, "Stuart" <> wrote:
    > To whom it may concern or can help:
    >
    > The available hardware is a Cisco 7505 with an RSP-4 256MB RAM/32MB
    > Flash Card. The goal is to (for the moment) setup load balancing and
    > failover with one router. For the moment, I would request that we skip
    > over the "one router debate" no matter how religiously you feel about
    > it.
    >
    > This what I am trying to get to as an end state:
    >
    > LAN #1 / Subnet #1: 192.168.254.0
    > 192.168.254.1 IP Address of FastEthernet0/0 Port on the 7505
    > 192.168.254.2 Server #1
    > 192.168.254.3 Workstation #1
    >
    > FastEthernet0/0 plugs into a Cisco Hub/Switch which has the ".2" and ".
    > 3" machines plugged into it
    > Each Server and Workstation has a gateway address 192.168.254.1
    >
    > LAN #2 / Subnet #2: 192.168.2.0 (FastEthernet0/1 on 7505)
    > 192.168.2.1 IP Address of FastEthernet0/1 Port on the 7505
    > 192.168.2.2 Server #2
    > 192.168.2.3 Workstation #2
    > 192.168.2.4 Workstation #3
    >
    > FastEthernet0/1 plugs into a Cisco Hub/Switch whas has the ".2", ".3",
    > and ".4" machines plugged into it
    > Each Server and Workstation has a gateway address of 192.168.2.1
    >
    > WAN #1 / Subnet #3: 192.168.1.0
    > 192.168.1.2 IP Address of FastEthernet1/0 Port on the 7505 (static
    > definition, not a DHCP client)
    > 192.168.1.1 IP Address of the DSL Modem (the DSL Modem does NAT
    > between it and the Internet)
    >
    > WAN #2 / Subnet #4: 192.168.3.0
    > 192.168.3.2 IP Address of FastEthernet1/1 Port on the 7505 (static
    > definition, not a DHCP client)
    > 192.168.3.1 IP Address of the Cable Modem (the Cable Modem does
    > Nat between it and the Internet)
    >
    > How can I configure the 7505 such that following are true:
    >
    > How do I accomplish Scenario #1:
    >
    > LAN #1 default routes it's non 254.0 subnet traffic to WAN #1
    > LAN #2 default routes it's non 2.0 subnet traffic to WAN #2
    >
    > If WAN #1 fails, LAN #1 automatically will route its non 254.0 traffic
    > to WAN #2
    > if WAN #2 fails, LAN #2 automatically will route it's non 2.0 traffic
    > to WAN #1
    >
    > How do I accomplish Scenario #2:
    >
    > LAN #1 and LAN #2 route to WAN #1 and WAN #2 using load balancing, and
    > if either WAN #1 or WAN #2 fails, traffic continues to flow to the
    > surviving interface until such time as the failing WAN connection
    > comes back online, and compels the router to revert back to a load
    > balancing state.
    >
    > Ideas? Please provide examples if you can, and recommendations as to
    > the features in an IOS which would be needed in order to support a
    > configuration in pursuit of this.
    >
    > Stuart


    Well for starters, I'm pretty sure your WAN routers (dsl/linksys
    router, etc) need to support a routing protocol. Most support RIP and
    cisco RIP will support load balancing provided the default route is
    the exact same and has the same metric. Statics won't do you any good
    here.

    The problem for you will be how to get them prioritized for the VLANs
    behind the core. By default, the core should load balance (if running
    RIP per above) based on session and would allow your vlans to push
    load across both internet pipes and would only use one if one failed.

    However, if you are hell-bent on sending one vlan over internet
    connection 1, and another vlan over internet connection 2, you
    probably want to use policy-based routing.

    http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/732/Tech/plicy_wp.htm
    http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/software/ios120/12cgcr/qos_c/qcpart1/qcpolicy.htm
     
    Trendkill, Feb 26, 2007
    #2
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