One or Two, Routers or Switches ?

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by buywheels@hotmail.com, Dec 23, 2005.

  1. Guest

    Hi, I am not a computer professional and am quite ignorant when it
    comes to networking. I have a question to the group and will appreciate
    if some knowledgable person can give me an answer.

    Recently I have been assigned a task to set up a six computer lab at
    work. They all run on Windows 2000 Pro (Don't ask me why they don't
    hire a pro to do it) We have two network feeds in the room. My question
    is, what is the best inexpensive way to hook up the six computers to
    the network, while making maximum use of the bandwidth provided by the
    two feeds ?

    Should I buy one or two, switch or router ? If I buy one switch can the
    two feeds be plugged in and utilized ? I have seen a switch with eight
    ports but does not specify where should the feed goes, does it matter ?


    If one switch / router will not work and I will have to buy TWO to make
    use of the two network feeds, what would be the differences between
    having routers or switches ?

    Thank you in advance.
     
    , Dec 23, 2005
    #1
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  2. why? Guest

    x-post was microsoft.public.win2000.networking,24hoursupport.helpdesk
    it's now 24hoursupport.helpdesk

    On 23 Dec 2005 09:02:36 -0800, wrote:

    >Hi, I am not a computer professional and am quite ignorant when it
    >comes to networking. I have a question to the group and will appreciate
    >if some knowledgable person can give me an answer.
    >
    >Recently I have been assigned a task to set up a six computer lab at
    >work. They all run on Windows 2000 Pro (Don't ask me why they don't
    >hire a pro to do it) We have two network feeds in the room. My question


    You missed details of the feeds into the room, provider (maybe) ,
    connection (adsl, cable, dial, existing site network, from a switch).

    >is, what is the best inexpensive way to hook up the six computers to
    >the network, while making maximum use of the bandwidth provided by the
    >two feeds ?


    Bandwith sharing is usually trickier, there are some commercial devices
    or Linux solutions see past posts in 24HSHD.
    http://groups.google.com/group/24hoursupport.helpdesk?
    search for

    author:why? bandwidth

    search for

    isp bandwidth router

    see the Nov 8th 2005 thread. Dual Broadband.

    >Should I buy one or two, switch or router ? If I buy one switch can the
    >two feeds be plugged in and utilized ? I have seen a switch with eight


    Not on a switch.

    >ports but does not specify where should the feed goes, does it matter ?


    That's usually 1 switch , 1 incoming feed. (VLANs , (not home types) are
    different, in case it's mentioned later, but then you need a good
    router, also not home types)

    Some switches have a uplink port with a normal/uplink button. Some don't
    .. so you just pick one, other have a dedicated port.

    >If one switch / router will not work and I will have to buy TWO to make
    >use of the two network feeds, what would be the differences between
    >having routers or switches ?


    Not again. Read past posts in 24HSHD, there are lots of links about
    this.

    A router joins together 2 networks (or more) and often of different
    technologies) i.e. 2000 PCs at work using Ethernet to the WAN using a
    commercial carrier over ATM.

    A switch shares a connection between a number of PCs. It does so with
    some smarts. Say 2PCs are transferring files locally, the traffic is PC1
    to switchport 1 to switchport2 to PC2. At the same time PCs3-6 are
    accessing the internet. The traffic is kept apart.

    For WAN, ATM etc., www.google.com or
    http://webopedia.com/ or http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page


    >Thank you in advance.


    Me
     
    why?, Dec 23, 2005
    #2
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  3. Kurt Guest

    If both of the feeds are to the same switch (as I would suspect), you would
    only use one of them (using both would create a loop and bring the network
    down). You want a switch. A switch will allow full bandwidth connections
    between hosts on your local segment (classroom) and you will share the 100Mb
    back to the next switch. 100 Megabits is way more than the average classroom
    will ever use.

    ....kurt


    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi, I am not a computer professional and am quite ignorant when it
    > comes to networking. I have a question to the group and will appreciate
    > if some knowledgable person can give me an answer.
    >
    > Recently I have been assigned a task to set up a six computer lab at
    > work. They all run on Windows 2000 Pro (Don't ask me why they don't
    > hire a pro to do it) We have two network feeds in the room. My question
    > is, what is the best inexpensive way to hook up the six computers to
    > the network, while making maximum use of the bandwidth provided by the
    > two feeds ?
    >
    > Should I buy one or two, switch or router ? If I buy one switch can the
    > two feeds be plugged in and utilized ? I have seen a switch with eight
    > ports but does not specify where should the feed goes, does it matter ?
    >
    >
    > If one switch / router will not work and I will have to buy TWO to make
    > use of the two network feeds, what would be the differences between
    > having routers or switches ?
    >
    > Thank you in advance.
    >
     
    Kurt, Dec 23, 2005
    #3
  4. Guest

    Thank you Kurt and CD for responding, appreciated your help. Tell me if
    I understand both of you correctly: the best thing for me to do is to
    get two switches, one for each 'feed', then plug three computers into
    each switch. Correct ?

    Kurt mentioned that plugging in two feeds into the same switch will
    create a loop and bring down the network.... wow, that surely sounds
    interesting..... let me see if my boss will give me a raise in the new
    year ;-)

    Kurt wrote:
    > If both of the feeds are to the same switch (as I would suspect), you would
    > only use one of them (using both would create a loop and bring the network
    > down). You want a switch. A switch will allow full bandwidth connections
    > between hosts on your local segment (classroom) and you will share the 100Mb
    > back to the next switch. 100 Megabits is way more than the average classroom
    > will ever use.
    >
    > ...kurt
    >
    >
    > <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Hi, I am not a computer professional and am quite ignorant when it
    > > comes to networking. I have a question to the group and will appreciate
    > > if some knowledgable person can give me an answer.
    > >
    > > Recently I have been assigned a task to set up a six computer lab at
    > > work. They all run on Windows 2000 Pro (Don't ask me why they don't
    > > hire a pro to do it) We have two network feeds in the room. My question
    > > is, what is the best inexpensive way to hook up the six computers to
    > > the network, while making maximum use of the bandwidth provided by the
    > > two feeds ?
    > >
    > > Should I buy one or two, switch or router ? If I buy one switch can the
    > > two feeds be plugged in and utilized ? I have seen a switch with eight
    > > ports but does not specify where should the feed goes, does it matter ?
    > >
    > >
    > > If one switch / router will not work and I will have to buy TWO to make
    > > use of the two network feeds, what would be the differences between
    > > having routers or switches ?
    > >
    > > Thank you in advance.
    > >
     
    , Dec 24, 2005
    #4
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