One more reason to hate plastic

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by RichA, Jun 20, 2011.

  1. RichA

    RichA Guest

    Ever had a video card or processor, or power supply fail because of a
    fan that stopped working? Plastic fan blades create static charge,
    this attracts dust, the dust slows down the fan, and makes it spin off
    axis, like an imbalanced car tire. Eventually, the fan fails because
    its bearing fails or the coils overheat.. So for want of a metal
    blade, you get a dead computer component likely worth 100x the price
    of the fan.
     
    RichA, Jun 20, 2011
    #1
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  2. RichA

    me Guest

    On Mon, 20 Jun 2011 13:46:46 -0700 (PDT), RichA <>
    wrote:

    >Ever had a video card or processor, or power supply fail because of a
    >fan that stopped working? Plastic fan blades create static charge,
    >this attracts dust, the dust slows down the fan, and makes it spin off
    >axis, like an imbalanced car tire. Eventually, the fan fails because
    >its bearing fails or the coils overheat.. So for want of a metal
    >blade, you get a dead computer component likely worth 100x the price
    >of the fan.



    Get off your arse and clean it once a year for crying out loud and all
    the other dust bunnies inside as well. You probably expect never to
    have to ever clean a dslr sensor either.
     
    me, Jun 20, 2011
    #2
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  3. RichA

    Whisky-dave Guest

    On Jun 20, 9:46 pm, RichA <> wrote:
    > Ever had a video card or processor, or power supply fail because of a
    > fan that stopped working?  Plastic fan blades create static charge,
    > this attracts dust, the dust slows down the fan, and makes it spin off
    > axis, like an imbalanced car tire.  Eventually, the fan fails because
    > its bearing fails or the coils overheat..  So for want of a metal
    > blade, you get a dead computer component likely worth 100x the price
    > of the fan.


    Problem is a metal bladed fan you be much heavier and put more strain
    on the mechanics shortening fan life and it'd be louder.
    It's also more difficult to cut & bend metal blades to the most
    efficient
    shape for the maximum airflow. I guess you could coat plastic blades
    with anti-static stuff.
    But I think the big problem is safety, child safety in particular.
    You have to assume that the little buggers are going to stick things
    where they shouldn;t
    and metal blades are far more dangerous from that POV.
     
    Whisky-dave, Jun 21, 2011
    #3
  4. RichA

    RichA Guest

    On Jun 21, 5:40 am, Whisky-dave <> wrote:
    > On Jun 20, 9:46 pm, RichA <> wrote:
    >
    > > Ever had a video card or processor, or power supply fail because of a
    > > fan that stopped working?  Plastic fan blades create static charge,
    > > this attracts dust, the dust slows down the fan, and makes it spin off
    > > axis, like an imbalanced car tire.  Eventually, the fan fails because
    > > its bearing fails or the coils overheat..  So for want of a metal
    > > blade, you get a dead computer component likely worth 100x the price
    > > of the fan.

    >
    > Problem is a metal bladed fan you be much heavier and put more strain
    > on the mechanics shortening fan life and it'd be louder.


    Metal blades need not be heavier. It can be made much thinner than
    plastic because it is stiffer.
     
    RichA, Jun 21, 2011
    #4
  5. RichA

    John A. Guest

    On Tue, 21 Jun 2011 10:19:45 -0700 (PDT), RichA <>
    wrote:

    >On Jun 21, 5:40 am, Whisky-dave <> wrote:
    >> On Jun 20, 9:46 pm, RichA <> wrote:
    >>
    >> > Ever had a video card or processor, or power supply fail because of a
    >> > fan that stopped working?  Plastic fan blades create static charge,
    >> > this attracts dust, the dust slows down the fan, and makes it spin off
    >> > axis, like an imbalanced car tire.  Eventually, the fan fails because
    >> > its bearing fails or the coils overheat..  So for want of a metal
    >> > blade, you get a dead computer component likely worth 100x the price
    >> > of the fan.

    >>
    >> Problem is a metal bladed fan you be much heavier and put more strain
    >> on the mechanics shortening fan life and it'd be louder.

    >
    >Metal blades need not be heavier. It can be made much thinner than
    >plastic because it is stiffer.


    Sure about that?
     
    John A., Jun 21, 2011
    #5
  6. RichA

    me Guest

    On Mon, 20 Jun 2011 21:45:33 -0500, Rich <> wrote:

    >me <> wrote in news:ctevv69180g9qko4u06matk7hfq6kk41u6@
    >4ax.com:
    >
    >> On Mon, 20 Jun 2011 13:46:46 -0700 (PDT), RichA <>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>Ever had a video card or processor, or power supply fail because of a
    >>>fan that stopped working? Plastic fan blades create static charge,
    >>>this attracts dust, the dust slows down the fan, and makes it spin off
    >>>axis, like an imbalanced car tire. Eventually, the fan fails because
    >>>its bearing fails or the coils overheat.. So for want of a metal
    >>>blade, you get a dead computer component likely worth 100x the price
    >>>of the fan.

    >>
    >>
    >> Get off your arse and clean it once a year for crying out loud and all
    >> the other dust bunnies inside as well. You probably expect never to
    >> have to ever clean a dslr sensor either.
    >>

    >
    >Haven't really had the problem, owning Olympus and Panasonic. Nikon is
    >another story...


    No, my now fairly old D300 is no real problem.
     
    me, Jun 21, 2011
    #6
  7. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    On 6/21/2011 5:45 PM, Savageduck wrote:
    > On 2011-06-21 13:28:42 -0700, me <> said:
    >
    >> On Mon, 20 Jun 2011 21:45:33 -0500, Rich <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> me <> wrote in news:ctevv69180g9qko4u06matk7hfq6kk41u6@
    >>> 4ax.com:
    >>>
    >>>> On Mon, 20 Jun 2011 13:46:46 -0700 (PDT), RichA <>
    >>>> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Ever had a video card or processor, or power supply fail because of a
    >>>>> fan that stopped working? Plastic fan blades create static charge,
    >>>>> this attracts dust, the dust slows down the fan, and makes it spin off
    >>>>> axis, like an imbalanced car tire. Eventually, the fan fails because
    >>>>> its bearing fails or the coils overheat.. So for want of a metal
    >>>>> blade, you get a dead computer component likely worth 100x the price
    >>>>> of the fan.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Get off your arse and clean it once a year for crying out loud and all
    >>>> the other dust bunnies inside as well. You probably expect never to
    >>>> have to ever clean a dslr sensor either.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> Haven't really had the problem, owning Olympus and Panasonic. Nikon is
    >>> another story...

    >>
    >> No, my now fairly old D300 is no real problem.

    >
    > Agreed.
    > The dust issue was very real for the D70, Nikon's true dust magnet,
    > owning one led me to learning plenty with regard to wet "sensor" cleaning.
    >
    > I have not had a major dust issue with D300/D300s. On one occasion the
    > Nikon sensor dust removal system failed to remove a single piece of
    > dust. That was easily handled with a blast from a Giotto's Rocket.
    >


    I easily removed any dust from my sensor on my D200, with a puff from an
    ear syringe. After many years of service my D300 has never had a dust
    spot issue. I never take off a lens when the camera is on. Every time
    the camera is turned on the camera rids itself of dust spots.

    I did not expect accurate information from Rich, did you?

    --
    Peter
     
    PeterN, Jun 21, 2011
    #7
  8. RichA

    John A. Guest

    On Mon, 20 Jun 2011 16:51:44 -0500, George Kerby
    <> wrote:

    >
    >
    >
    >On 6/20/11 3:46 PM, in article
    >, "RichA"
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >> Ever had a video card or processor, or power supply fail because of a
    >> fan that stopped working? Plastic fan blades create static charge,
    >> this attracts dust, the dust slows down the fan, and makes it spin off
    >> axis, like an imbalanced car tire. Eventually, the fan fails because
    >> its bearing fails or the coils overheat.. So for want of a metal
    >> blade, you get a dead computer component likely worth 100x the price
    >> of the fan.

    >
    >
    >Mr. McGuire: I just want to say one word to you. Just one word.
    >Benjamin: Yes, sir.
    >Mr. McGuire: Are you listening?
    >Benjamin: Yes, I am.
    >Mr. McGuire: Plastics.
    >RichA: OH MY GOD! NO! NOOOOOOOOOOPOOO!!!!!!!!


    I guess he missed his chance to get in on the ground floor.
     
    John A., Jun 22, 2011
    #8
  9. > axis, like an imbalanced car tire. Eventually, the fan fails because
    > its bearing fails or the coils overheat.. So for want of a metal
    > blade, you get a dead computer component likely worth 100x the price
    > of the fan.


    The real problem is not the material of the fan blade, but people
    refusing to repair and maintain old stuffs on behalf of costs.

    --
    @~@ You have the right to remain silence.
    / v \ Simplicity is Beauty! May the Force and farces be with you!
    /( _ )\ (x86_64 Ubuntu 9.10) Linux 2.6.39.1
    ^ ^ 17:15:01 up 11 days 1:24 1 user load average: 1.04 1.06 1.05
    ä¸å€Ÿè²¸! ä¸è©é¨™! ä¸æ´äº¤! ä¸æ‰“交! ä¸æ‰“劫! ä¸è‡ªæ®º! è«‹è€ƒæ…®ç¶œæ´ (CSSA):
    http://www.swd.gov.hk/tc/index/site_pubsvc/page_socsecu/sub_addressesa
     
    Man-wai Chang, Jun 22, 2011
    #9
  10. RichA

    RichA Guest

    On Jun 21, 6:40 pm, PeterN <> wrote:
    > On 6/21/2011 5:45 PM, Savageduck wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > On 2011-06-21 13:28:42 -0700, me <> said:

    >
    > >> On Mon, 20 Jun 2011 21:45:33 -0500, Rich <> wrote:

    >
    > >>> me <> wrote in news:ctevv69180g9qko4u06matk7hfq6kk41u6@
    > >>> 4ax.com:

    >
    > >>>> On Mon, 20 Jun 2011 13:46:46 -0700 (PDT), RichA <>
    > >>>> wrote:

    >
    > >>>>> Ever had a video card or processor, or power supply fail because ofa
    > >>>>> fan that stopped working? Plastic fan blades create static charge,
    > >>>>> this attracts dust, the dust slows down the fan, and makes it spin off
    > >>>>> axis, like an imbalanced car tire. Eventually, the fan fails because
    > >>>>> its bearing fails or the coils overheat.. So for want of a metal
    > >>>>> blade, you get a dead computer component likely worth 100x the price
    > >>>>> of the fan.

    >
    > >>>> Get off your arse and clean it once a year for crying out loud and all
    > >>>> the other dust bunnies inside as well. You probably expect never to
    > >>>> have to ever clean a dslr sensor either.

    >
    > >>> Haven't really had the problem, owning Olympus and Panasonic. Nikon is
    > >>> another story...

    >
    > >> No, my now fairly old D300 is no real problem.

    >
    > > Agreed.
    > > The dust issue was very real for the D70, Nikon's true dust magnet,
    > > owning one led me to learning plenty with regard to wet "sensor" cleaning.

    >
    > > I have not had a major dust issue with D300/D300s. On one occasion the
    > > Nikon sensor dust removal system failed to remove a single piece of
    > > dust. That was easily handled with a blast from a Giotto's Rocket.

    >
    > I easily removed any dust from my sensor on my D200, with a puff from an
    > ear syringe. After many years of service my D300 has never had a dust
    > spot issue. I never take off a lens when the camera is on. Every time
    > the camera is turned on the camera rids itself of dust spots.
    >
    > I did not expect accurate information from Rich, did you?
    >
    > --
    > Peter


    The only people who think the D200/300 don't have major dust issues
    are those who have never owned Olympus or Panasonic. Nikons get dust
    on them days after their first use, if you change a lens.
     
    RichA, Jun 22, 2011
    #10
  11. RichA

    RichA Guest

    On Jun 22, 5:58 am, wrote:
    > On Mon, 20 Jun 2011 13:46:46 -0700 (PDT), RichA <>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >Ever had a video card or processor, or power supply fail because of a
    > >fan that stopped working?  Plastic fan blades create static charge,
    > >this attracts dust, the dust slows down the fan, and makes it spin off
    > >axis, like an imbalanced car tire.  Eventually, the fan fails because
    > >its bearing fails or the coils overheat..  So for want of a metal
    > >blade, you get a dead computer component likely worth 100x the price
    > >of the fan.

    >
    > Please tell me Rich, is there ANYTHING you DO LIKE?
    >
    > Does ANYTHING meet with your approval at ALL in this imperfect world?


    Is anything perfect? No, only idiots think they exist. Is anyone
    100% contented with a camera of any kind? Only imbeciles and
    undemanding types, who ironically are often the lazy people who HAVE
    camera issues because they are too lazy to read their manuals.
     
    RichA, Jun 22, 2011
    #11
  12. On 6/22/11 7:24 AM, RichA wrote:
    > On Jun 22, 5:58 am, wrote:


    >> Please tell me Rich, is there ANYTHING you DO LIKE?
    >>
    >> Does ANYTHING meet with your approval at ALL in this imperfect world?

    >
    > Is anything perfect? No, only idiots think they exist. Is anyone
    > 100% contented with a camera of any kind? Only imbeciles and
    > undemanding types, who ironically are often the lazy people who HAVE
    > camera issues because they are too lazy to read their manuals.


    Try to answer the question!
     
    John McWilliams, Jun 22, 2011
    #12
  13. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    On 6/22/2011 10:22 AM, RichA wrote:
    > On Jun 21, 6:40 pm, PeterN<> wrote:



    <snip>

    >>
    >> I easily removed any dust from my sensor on my D200, with a puff from an
    >> ear syringe. After many years of service my D300 has never had a dust
    >> spot issue. I never take off a lens when the camera is on. Every time
    >> the camera is turned on the camera rids itself of dust spots.
    >>
    >> I did not expect accurate information from Rich, did you?
    >>
    >> --
    >> Peter

    >
    > The only people who think the D200/300 don't have major dust issues
    > are those who have never owned Olympus or Panasonic. Nikons get dust
    > on them days after their first use, if you change a lens.



    Your statement makes no sense. You are saying I would have less than
    zero major issues with a different make camera.

    BTW what is your experience that qualifies you to make such broad stroke
    evaluations. Post your CV so we may evaluate your wisdom.


    --
    Peter
     
    PeterN, Jun 22, 2011
    #13
  14. RichA

    Robert Coe Guest

    On Mon, 20 Jun 2011 21:47:04 -0500, Rich <> wrote:
    : George Kerby <> wrote in news:CA252B20.70B3C%
    : :
    :
    : > On 6/20/11 3:46 PM, in article
    : > ,
    : > "RichA" <> wrote:
    : >
    : >> Ever had a video card or processor, or power supply fail because of a
    : >> fan that stopped working? Plastic fan blades create static charge,
    : >> this attracts dust, the dust slows down the fan, and makes it spin off
    : >> axis, like an imbalanced car tire. Eventually, the fan fails because
    : >> its bearing fails or the coils overheat.. So for want of a metal
    : >> blade, you get a dead computer component likely worth 100x the price
    : >> of the fan.
    : >
    : >
    : > Mr. McGuire: I just want to say one word to you. Just one word.
    : > Benjamin: Yes, sir.
    : > Mr. McGuire: Are you listening?
    : > Benjamin: Yes, I am.
    : > Mr. McGuire: Plastics.
    : > RichA: OH MY GOD! NO! NOOOOOOOOOOPOOO!!!!!!!!
    :
    : The Graduate.

    You're right!! That's precisely where the quote is from! Apparently you think
    we're underestimating you by assuming you wouldn't know. But the truth is the
    opposite (or is it the contrapositive?): You're underestimating us by thinking
    we'd think you wouldn't know. Etc.

    For extra credit: From what college did The Graduate graduate?

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Jun 23, 2011
    #14
  15. RichA

    John Turco Guest

    RichA wrote:
    >
    > Ever had a video card or processor, or power supply fail because of a
    > fan that stopped working? Plastic fan blades create static charge,
    > this attracts dust, the dust slows down the fan, and makes it spin off
    > axis, like an imbalanced car tire. Eventually, the fan fails because
    > its bearing fails or the coils overheat.. So for want of a metal
    > blade, you get a dead computer component likely worth 100x the price
    > of the fan.



    My ATI "All In Wonder Radeon 8500DV" (AGP video card) has a heat
    sink/fan, mounted on its GPU. The crummy fan was always faulty
    (nothing to do with dust), which means I can't enable "hardware
    acceleration" -- because, if I do so, the 8500DV will eventually
    overheat and shut itself down.

    Then, I'm left with a blank monitor screen and need to reboot
    my computer.

    You see, Richard...this is known as "thermal protection."
    Better devices have it, and won't allow a dead fan to cause
    any hardware damage.

    Even ATI, itself, knew this, when the 8500DV debuted in 2001.
    The lousy Canadian manufacturer hadn't been acquired my the
    U.S.A.'s mighty AMD, yet, either.

    --
    Cordially,
    John Turco <>

    Marie's Musings <http://fairiesandtails.blogspot.com>
     
    John Turco, Jun 30, 2011
    #15
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