One More DSL Question

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by Roy@home.NOT, Oct 16, 2004.

  1. Guest

    Got set up with DSL and wireless router. Now ... Should I be looking
    at a firewall. This is a home set up with 2 computers.

    Thanks

    Roy - Carpe Noctem
     
    , Oct 16, 2004
    #1
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  2. Chet Guest

    If the router doesn't have integral firewall you need firewall software in
    both computers.
    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Got set up with DSL and wireless router. Now ... Should I be looking
    > at a firewall. This is a home set up with 2 computers.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Roy - Carpe Noctem
     
    Chet, Oct 16, 2004
    #2
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  3. James Baber Guest

    To Roy:

    Most definitely!!!

    Anyone accessing the internet via an always on interface like DSL, ISDN, or
    CABLE should always use a firewall.

    Some access point routers and hubs have integral hardware firewalls (some
    Linksys models), Windows XP contains a limited software firewall. and there is
    at least 1 good free software firewall (Zone Alarm).

    The Zone Alarm product has 1 feature I particularly like, it will not allow your
    computer to call over the internet from any internal program without your
    specific approval (one time or ongoing option). What this stops is anyone that
    finds a way into your computer via some new technic, still cannot download your
    data (passwords, financial info. programs you paid for, whatever) or to use your
    computer in a denial of service attack on a 3rd party or even as source of porn
    for him.

    wrote:
    > Got set up with DSL and wireless router. Now ... Should I be looking
    > at a firewall. This is a home set up with 2 computers.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Roy - Carpe Noctem


    --

    Jim Baber

    (see my 10kW grid tied solar system at "www.baber.org")

    1350 W Mesa Ave.
    Fresno CA, 93711
    (559) 435-9068
    (559) 905-2204 cell

    Email
     
    James Baber, Oct 16, 2004
    #3
  4. derek / nul Guest

    Roy,

    You need to know whether your router is using NAT?
    If it is you don't need a firewall on the pc's.


    On Sat, 16 Oct 2004 18:42:48 GMT, wrote:

    >Got set up with DSL and wireless router. Now ... Should I be looking
    >at a firewall. This is a home set up with 2 computers.
    >
    >Thanks
    >
    >Roy - Carpe Noctem
     
    derek / nul, Oct 16, 2004
    #4
  5. James Baber Guest

    derek / nul wrote:

    > Roy,
    >
    > You need to know whether your router is using NAT?
    > If it is you don't need a firewall on the pc's.
    >

    Response to Roy's comment from Jim Baber:

    What is NAT?

    I've been in the hardware and software business since 1957, and although I
    started messing with PCs in 1975 with an IMSAI 8080, that particular
    abbreviation doesn't ring a bell for me. Lord knows it may be valid, but its
    not common.

    I am sure that someone who has asked a reasonable, but inexperienced
    question about firewalls doesn't know what you are talking about. Give newbies
    help, don't blow smoke at them.
    >
    > On Sat, 16 Oct 2004 18:42:48 GMT, wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Got set up with DSL and wireless router. Now ... Should I be looking
    >>at a firewall. This is a home set up with 2 computers.
    >>
    >>Thanks
    >>
    >>Roy - Carpe Noctem

    >
    >


    --

    Jim Baber

    (see my 10kW grid tied solar system at "www.baber.org")

    1350 W Mesa Ave.
    Fresno CA, 93711
    (559) 435-9068
    (559) 905-2204 cell

    Email
     
    James Baber, Oct 17, 2004
    #5
  6. Thagor Guest

    James Baber <> wrote in
    news:QWlcd.379161$mD.298350@attbi_s02:

    >
    >
    > derek / nul wrote:
    >
    >> Roy,
    >>
    >> You need to know whether your router is using NAT?
    >> If it is you don't need a firewall on the pc's.
    >>

    > Response to Roy's comment from Jim Baber:
    >
    > What is NAT?
    >
    > I've been in the hardware and software business since 1957, and
    > although I
    > started messing with PCs in 1975 with an IMSAI 8080, that particular
    > abbreviation doesn't ring a bell for me. Lord knows it may be valid,
    > but its not common.
    >
    > I am sure that someone who has asked a reasonable, but
    > inexperienced
    > question about firewalls doesn't know what you are talking about.
    > Give newbies help, don't blow smoke at them.
    >>
    >> On Sat, 16 Oct 2004 18:42:48 GMT, wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Got set up with DSL and wireless router. Now ... Should I be looking
    >>>at a firewall. This is a home set up with 2 computers.
    >>>
    >>>Thanks
    >>>
    >>>Roy - Carpe Noctem

    >>
    >>

    >

    Ever heard of Google?

    How Network Address Translation Works
    by Jeff Tyson
    http://computer.howstuffworks.com/nat.htm
     
    Thagor, Oct 17, 2004
    #6
  7. Guest

    On Sun, 17 Oct 2004 03:46:56 GMT, James Baber <> wrote:

    >
    >derek / nul wrote:
    >
    >> Roy,
    >>
    >> You need to know whether your router is using NAT?
    >> If it is you don't need a firewall on the pc's.
    >>

    >Response to Roy's comment from Jim Baber:
    >
    >What is NAT?


    No prob, dude. The box the router came in says it has SPI.
     
    , Oct 17, 2004
    #7
  8. Jim Berwick Guest

    James Baber <> wrote in news:QWlcd.379161$mD.298350@attbi_s02:

    > What is NAT?


    Network Address Translation. It basically does this:
    Net request comes in from internet network, say, IP address 192.168.0.10.
    Removes 192.167.0.10 from src IP on packet, puts in the public address of
    the router. Sends packet out, when the reply comes back it takes it's
    address out of the destination, puts 192.168.0.10 back and sends it back to
    the internet network to the right computer.

    NAT is not really a firewall. At best, it can be called a poor man's
    firewall. However, for the average person, it is more then enough.
     
    Jim Berwick, Oct 17, 2004
    #8
  9. Jim Berwick Guest

    wrote in news::

    > No prob, dude. The box the router came in says it has SPI.
    >


    SPI would be Stateful Packet Inspection, which means the router is not just
    doing NAT, and it has an actual firewall built in. You're all set, Roy.
     
    Jim Berwick, Oct 17, 2004
    #9
  10. Guest

    On Sun, 17 Oct 2004 07:04:04 +0000, Jim Berwick <> wrote:

    >SPI would be Stateful Packet Inspection, which means the router is not just
    >doing NAT, and it has an actual firewall built in. You're all set, Roy.


    YEP. Got NAT with SPI. I'm AOK.

    Funny story. My router comes with a 100 page on-line manual, but no
    Quick Start, nor a chapter called "Simple Home Setup".

    So, I cranked up the install program and carefully wrote down all my
    entries as I went through the install. Then I went upstairs to the
    GF's computer and looked at the software for her wireless card.

    Curiously ... not one of the labels matched. The item my manufacturer
    calls a "lion", her manufacturer calls a "tiger", etc. Thought I
    correctly second guessed all the labels and put the right information,
    but couldn't get it to work.

    So, I called a friend who walked me through the entries. When we got
    to the 128 bit passcode, he said to look for a 26 character/numeric
    code. I said "I'm looking right at it, and it has 22 characters. In
    fact, the box isn't big enough for 26 characters. Just room for 22."

    "Aha!" Said my friend.

    Roy - Carpe Noctem
     
    , Oct 17, 2004
    #10
  11. derek / nul Guest

    On Sun, 17 Oct 2004 03:46:56 GMT, James Baber <> wrote:
    >What is NAT?
    >
    > I've been in the hardware and software business since 1957, and although I
    >started messing with PCs in 1975 with an IMSAI 8080, that particular
    >abbreviation doesn't ring a bell for me. Lord knows it may be valid, but its
    >not common.
    >
    > I am sure that someone who has asked a reasonable, but inexperienced
    >question about firewalls doesn't know what you are talking about. Give newbies
    >help, don't blow smoke at them.


    If you have been in the business since 1957, then you know where to go to find
    out where it is.

    If the op has a further question, let them ask.

    I notice you didn't offer any assistance??
     
    derek / nul, Oct 17, 2004
    #11
  12. Jim Berwick Guest

    wrote in news::

    > So, I called a friend who walked me through the entries. When we got
    > to the 128 bit passcode, he said to look for a 26 character/numeric
    > code. I said "I'm looking right at it, and it has 22 characters. In
    > fact, the box isn't big enough for 26 characters. Just room for 22."


    The thing that gets most people is that sometimes you need to enter the
    password in ascii and sometimes hex, and each of those will be a different
    field length. Even tougher when I was setting up a wireless Linux laptop,
    there is no choice of ascii or hex. If the key is being entered in hex,
    you have to put 0x in front of it. Took like, an hour of troubleshooting
    to realize that is what I was doing wrong.
     
    Jim Berwick, Oct 17, 2004
    #12
  13. Guest

    On Sun, 17 Oct 2004 07:55:54 +0000, Jim Berwick <> wrote:

    > wrote in news::
    >
    >> So, I called a friend who walked me through the entries. When we got
    >> to the 128 bit passcode, he said to look for a 26 character/numeric
    >> code. I said "I'm looking right at it, and it has 22 characters. In
    >> fact, the box isn't big enough for 26 characters. Just room for 22."

    >
    >The thing that gets most people is that sometimes you need to enter the
    >password in ascii and sometimes hex, and each of those will be a different
    >field length. Even tougher when I was setting up a wireless Linux laptop,
    >there is no choice of ascii or hex. If the key is being entered in hex,
    >you have to put 0x in front of it. Took like, an hour of troubleshooting
    >to realize that is what I was doing wrong.


    Seems like we go through this every 10 years. New technology. Really
    sharp new generation of programmers, but clueless about user
    interface.
     
    , Oct 17, 2004
    #13
  14. Jerry G. Guest

    Most routers have built in firewalls. Check your router's instruction manual
    for details. Some of the DSL modems also have a built in firewall.

    If your router does not have a built in firewall, it would be best to get
    one that does. They are not expensive for a home type network.

    I myself do not like to use firewall softwares. They are very high on
    resource usage, and slow a lot of things down. I found that on networks,
    they can create a lot of complicated problems to sort through. I myself am
    using a hardware firewall, and it works great.

    --

    Jerry G.
    ==========================


    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    Got set up with DSL and wireless router. Now ... Should I be looking
    at a firewall. This is a home set up with 2 computers.

    Thanks

    Roy - Carpe Noctem
     
    Jerry G., Oct 17, 2004
    #14
  15. James Baber Guest

    Reply to Derek from Jim Baber:

    You are correct Derek, I should be ashamed of myself, I had just skipped through
    a bunch of rude and unhelpful remarks from several people whom I am sure I don't
    need to identify.
    At that point I didn't take the time to search out a reasonable meaning for NAT,
    which is yet another acronym. I should have, but I wouldn't have said anything
    if that had been your suggestion.

    derek / nul wrote:
    > On Sun, 17 Oct 2004 03:46:56 GMT, James Baber <> wrote:
    >
    >>What is NAT?
    >>
    >> I've been in the hardware and software business since 1957, and although I
    >>started messing with PCs in 1975 with an IMSAI 8080, that particular
    >>abbreviation doesn't ring a bell for me. Lord knows it may be valid, but its
    >>not common.
    >>
    >> I am sure that someone who has asked a reasonable, but inexperienced
    >>question about firewalls doesn't know what you are talking about. Give newbies
    >>help, don't blow smoke at them.

    >
    >
    > If you have been in the business since 1957, then you know where to go to find
    > out where it is.
    >
    > If the op has a further question, let them ask.
    >
    > I notice you didn't offer any assistance??
    >


    --

    Jim Baber

    (see my 10kW grid tied solar system at "www.baber.org")

    1350 W Mesa Ave.
    Fresno CA, 93711
    (559) 435-9068
    (559) 905-2204 cell

    Email
     
    James Baber, Oct 17, 2004
    #15
  16. Luke Lock Guest

    James Baber wrote:

    > Reply to Derek from Jim Baber:
    >
    > You are correct Derek, I should be ashamed of myself, I had just skipped
    > through a bunch of rude and unhelpful remarks from several people whom I
    > am sure I don't need to identify.


    Maybe if you didn't brag so much about all your supposed experience and
    instead focused on your real lack of it, nobody would have had a cause to
    ridicule and pillory you, hey.
     
    Luke Lock, Oct 18, 2004
    #16
  17. Lone Ranger Guest

    NAT

    Short for Network Address Translation, an Internet standard that enables a
    local-area network (LAN) to use one set of IP addresses for internal traffic
    and a second set of addresses for external traffic. A NAT box located where
    the LAN meets the Internet makes all necessary IP address translations.

    NAT serves three main purposes:

    a.. Provides a type of firewall by hiding internal IP addresses
    b.. Enables a company to use more internal IP addresses. Since they're
    used internally only, there's no possibility of conflict with IP addresses
    used by other companies and organizations.
    c.. Allows a company to combine multiple ISDN connections into a single
    Internet connection.
     
    Lone Ranger, Oct 21, 2004
    #17
  18. In article <>,
    kadbitcha <> wrote:
    >
    >From the post you replied to:


    How many friends do you have?

    >BWAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAH GAGAGAGAGAGAGAGAG HAHAHAHAHAHAHAAH!!!




    >What in particular did you fail to infer from any of that, you stupid,
    >snotfucked ****?


    Nice whine. Must you marinate in it?

    --
    Lady Chatterly

    "That is a bot or someone playing as a bot. I dumped it in my KF the
    first day. Is it following the group or me?" -- 'Ratz
     
    Lady Chatterly, Oct 21, 2004
    #18
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