Olympus announces first ever true DSLR with live preview system

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Digital Photography Now, Jan 26, 2006.

  1. * Dual sensor live preview system, retaining traditional optical viewfinder

    * Introduces new Live MOS sensor technology

    DPNow news analysis, plus full specifications and official press release and
    lots of pictures:

    http://dpnow.com/2392.html

    Digital Photography Now
    http://dpnow.com
     
    Digital Photography Now, Jan 26, 2006
    #1
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  2. Digital Photography Now

    Paul Rubin Guest

    Huh? The ancient E-10 had live preview.
     
    Paul Rubin, Jan 26, 2006
    #2
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  3. Read the story - the E-10 is mentioned there.

    Ian

    "Paul Rubin" <http://> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Huh? The ancient E-10 had live preview.
     
    Digital Photography Now, Jan 26, 2006
    #3
  4. Digital Photography Now

    A.A Guest

    Paul Rubin wrote:
    > Huh? The ancient E-10 had live preview.


    It didn't have interchangable lenses. For me this is a sweet camera
    for club/concert and public events where I have to shoot over head but
    still have the ability to use my ZD lenses.
     
    A.A, Jan 26, 2006
    #4
  5. Digital Photography Now

    Skip M Guest

    "Digital Photography Now" <> wrote in message
    news:F3ZBf.19018$...
    >* Dual sensor live preview system, retaining traditional optical viewfinder
    >
    > * Introduces new Live MOS sensor technology
    >
    > DPNow news analysis, plus full specifications and official press release
    > and lots of pictures:
    >
    > http://dpnow.com/2392.html
    >
    > Digital Photography Now
    > http://dpnow.com
    >

    Well, that happened a lot sooner than I expected. Of course, at least
    according to DPReview, it's at a cost of a darker optical viewfinder. Oly
    has taken the route of a semi transparent mirror, a la Canon RTS, to get the
    light to the review sensor and still get an image to the viewfinder, too.

    --
    Skip Middleton
    http://www.shadowcatcherimagery.com
     
    Skip M, Jan 26, 2006
    #5
  6. Digital Photography Now

    Alfred Molon Guest

    In article <F3ZBf.19018$>,
    says...
    > * Dual sensor live preview system, retaining traditional optical viewfinder
    >
    > * Introduces new Live MOS sensor technology
    >
    > DPNow news analysis, plus full specifications and official press release and
    > lots of pictures:
    >
    > http://dpnow.com/2392.html


    WOW! Finally a manufacturer wo got it.
    --

    Alfred Molon
    ------------------------------
    Olympus 50X0, 7070, 8080, E300, E500 forum at
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MyOlympus/
    Olympus E500 resource - http://myolympus.org/E500/
     
    Alfred Molon, Jan 26, 2006
    #6
  7. Digital Photography Now

    Mark² Guest

    Alfred Molon wrote:
    > In article <F3ZBf.19018$>,
    > says...
    >> * Dual sensor live preview system, retaining traditional optical
    >> viewfinder
    >>
    >> * Introduces new Live MOS sensor technology
    >>
    >> DPNow news analysis, plus full specifications and official press
    >> release and lots of pictures:
    >>
    >> http://dpnow.com/2392.html

    >
    > WOW! Finally a manufacturer wo got it.


    Got what?
    -A dark viewfinder?
    Yep...that's what they've got.
    Some will apparently be willing to buy this.
     
    Mark², Jan 26, 2006
    #7
  8. Digital Photography Now

    SMS Guest

    Digital Photography Now wrote:
    > * Dual sensor live preview system, retaining traditional optical viewfinder
    >
    > * Introduces new Live MOS sensor technology
    >
    > DPNow news analysis, plus full specifications and official press release and
    > lots of pictures:
    >
    > http://dpnow.com/2392.html
    >
    > Digital Photography Now
    > http://dpnow.com


    The second part of that announcement is even more interesting. The new
    sensor may solve the problem that's been plaguing 4:3 since the beginning.

    That article did get something wrong though, Cypress did not supply the
    sensor for the Kodak D-SLRs, those came from Fill-Factory, and were
    manufactured by Tower Semiconductor in Israel.
     
    SMS, Jan 26, 2006
    #8
  9. Digital Photography Now

    Pete D Guest

    "Mark²" <mjmorgan(lowest even number here)@cox..net> wrote in message
    news:3b%Bf.46078$V.31711@fed1read04...
    > Alfred Molon wrote:
    >> In article <F3ZBf.19018$>,
    >> says...
    >>> * Dual sensor live preview system, retaining traditional optical
    >>> viewfinder
    >>>
    >>> * Introduces new Live MOS sensor technology
    >>>
    >>> DPNow news analysis, plus full specifications and official press
    >>> release and lots of pictures:
    >>>
    >>> http://dpnow.com/2392.html

    >>
    >> WOW! Finally a manufacturer wo got it.

    >
    > Got what?
    > -A dark viewfinder?
    > Yep...that's what they've got.
    > Some will apparently be willing to buy this.


    I can see the use for some but think it is highly over rated by those that
    demand it.
     
    Pete D, Jan 26, 2006
    #9
  10. Digital Photography Now

    A.A Guest


    >
    > Got what?
    > -A dark viewfinder?
    > Yep...that's what they've got.
    > Some will apparently be willing to buy this.
    >
    >


    Sure will and cant wait to strap my 11-22mm or the upcoming 8mm fisheye
    onto it. This will be a killer camera for night club/event shots
    compared to my E1. So many new angles of voew explore now which I missed
    out on by using an OVF and not being able to get too close to the ground.

    Use my E1 for normal shot and then teh E330 for anything that need me to
    perform yoga moves.

    While you sit there all bitching about about some minute drawback to a
    camrea you would never buy in the first place I'll be out exploring new
    ways to imrpove my photo skills.
     
    A.A, Jan 26, 2006
    #10
  11. Digital Photography Now

    SMS Guest

    Pete D wrote:

    > I can see the use for some but think it is highly over rated by those that
    > demand it.


    I am surprised by the number of people with point and shoot digital
    cameras that I see using the viewfinder as opposed to the LCD, even
    indoors where the LCD is more usable. Outside, the LCD is pretty much
    useless in the daytime, but inside I'd have thought that everyone would
    prefer the LCD over the optical viewfinder.

    Still, it's a feature that will probably help Olympus a lot in their
    target market, at least until Nikon and Canon introduce entry level
    D-SLRs with this feature. But who knows? I thought that the built-in
    image-stabilization on Konica-Minolta D-SLRs was such a great feature
    that it would have enabled Konica-Minolta to compete in D-SLRs, but it
    didn't happen.
     
    SMS, Jan 26, 2006
    #11
  12. Digital Photography Now

    Guest

    On Thu, 26 Jan 2006 05:25:57 GMT, "Digital Photography Now" <> wrote:

    > * Dual sensor live preview system, retaining traditional optical viewfinder
    >
    > * Introduces new Live MOS sensor technology
    >
    > DPNow news analysis, plus full specifications and official press release and
    > lots of pictures:


    They nearly have it right. If the LCD screen was more versatile (like it is on my Canon S2 IS), I
    would buy one as soon as I could.

    Oh, a built-in microphone for adding comments to your images would also be most useful.
     
    , Jan 26, 2006
    #12
  13. Digital Photography Now

    Guest

    SMS wrote:
    > I am surprised by the number of people with point and shoot digital
    > cameras that I see using the viewfinder as opposed to the LCD, even
    > indoors where the LCD is more usable. Outside, the LCD is pretty much
    > useless in the daytime, but inside I'd have thought that everyone would
    > prefer the LCD over the optical viewfinder.


    I think it might be a question of ergonomics and biomechanics : while
    using a viewfinder, the camera is (kind of) bonded to your head, and
    sees the same things as you, just where you look. That makes easier to
    think of what will be in the image, and "previsualize" it.

    I personnaly find that framing an image with a camera in hands, which
    sees where you aim it and not where you are aimed to, is a bit more
    unnatural - but YES that may be very convenient, in some cases.

    Sorry for my english,
    Nicolas
     
    , Jan 26, 2006
    #13
  14. Digital Photography Now

    Guest

    SMS wrote:
    > I am surprised by the number of people with point and shoot digital
    > cameras that I see using the viewfinder as opposed to the LCD, even
    > indoors where the LCD is more usable. Outside, the LCD is pretty much
    > useless in the daytime, but inside I'd have thought that everyone would
    > prefer the LCD over the optical viewfinder.


    I think it might be a question of ergonomics and biomechanics : while
    using a viewfinder, the camera is (kind of) bonded to your head, and
    sees the same things as you, just where you look. That makes easier to
    think of what will be in the image, and "previsualize" it.

    I personnaly find that framing an image with a camera in hands, which
    sees where you aim it and not where you are aimed to, is a bit more
    unnatural - but YES that may be very convenient, in some cases.

    Sorry for my english,
    Nicolas
     
    , Jan 26, 2006
    #14
  15. Nicolas, your english is a lot better than I see some native speakers write
    here! Bravo!

    Ian

    Digtal Photography Now
    http://dpnow.com

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > SMS wrote:
    >> I am surprised by the number of people with point and shoot digital
    >> cameras that I see using the viewfinder as opposed to the LCD, even
    >> indoors where the LCD is more usable. Outside, the LCD is pretty much
    >> useless in the daytime, but inside I'd have thought that everyone would
    >> prefer the LCD over the optical viewfinder.

    >
    > I think it might be a question of ergonomics and biomechanics : while
    > using a viewfinder, the camera is (kind of) bonded to your head, and
    > sees the same things as you, just where you look. That makes easier to
    > think of what will be in the image, and "previsualize" it.
    >
    > I personnaly find that framing an image with a camera in hands, which
    > sees where you aim it and not where you are aimed to, is a bit more
    > unnatural - but YES that may be very convenient, in some cases.
    >
    > Sorry for my english,
    > Nicolas
    >
     
    Digital Photography Now, Jan 26, 2006
    #15
  16. In article <F3ZBf.19018$>, Digital
    Photography Now <> wrote:

    > * Dual sensor live preview system, retaining traditional optical viewfinder
    >
    > * Introduces new Live MOS sensor technology


    I guess some people just need a crutch. The retards will buy it, for
    sure.
     
    Randall Ainsworth, Jan 26, 2006
    #16
  17. Re: Correction

    Thanks for pointing that out; I have re-checked this and you are perfectly
    right. I have now added a correction to the article
    (http://dpnow.com/2392.html)

    Ian

    Digital Photography Now
    http://dpnow.com

    "SMS" <> wrote in message
    news:43d8827b$0$95982$...
    > Digital Photography Now wrote:
    >> * Dual sensor live preview system, retaining traditional optical
    >> viewfinder
    >>
    >> * Introduces new Live MOS sensor technology
    >>
    >> DPNow news analysis, plus full specifications and official press release
    >> and lots of pictures:
    >>
    >> http://dpnow.com/2392.html
    >>
    >> Digital Photography Now
    >> http://dpnow.com

    >
    > The second part of that announcement is even more interesting. The new
    > sensor may solve the problem that's been plaguing 4:3 since the beginning.
    >
    > That article did get something wrong though, Cypress did not supply the
    > sensor for the Kodak D-SLRs, those came from Fill-Factory, and were
    > manufactured by Tower Semiconductor in Israel.
     
    Digital Photography Now, Jan 26, 2006
    #17
  18. In article <OA%Bf.331052$2k.226782@pd7tw1no>, A.A <>
    wrote:

    > While you sit there all bitching about about some minute drawback to a
    > camrea you would never buy in the first place I'll be out exploring new
    > ways to imrpove my photo skills.


    A crutch is not going to improve your photo skills. You need to learn
    that there's no magic in the box.
     
    Randall Ainsworth, Jan 26, 2006
    #18
  19. Digital Photography Now

    Beef Guest

    On Thu, 26 Jan 2006 03:00:33 -0800, nikojorj_jaimepaslapub wrote:

    > I think it might be a question of ergonomics and biomechanics : while
    > using a viewfinder, the camera is (kind of) bonded to your head, and
    > sees the same things as you, just where you look. That makes easier to
    > think of what will be in the image, and "previsualize" it.
    >
    > I personnaly find that framing an image with a camera in hands, which
    > sees where you aim it and not where you are aimed to, is a bit more
    > unnatural - but YES that may be very convenient, in some cases.
    >
    > Sorry for my english,
    > Nicolas


    T'inqiètes pas, Nico. 20/20.

    Some "point and shoot" digital cameras also drain batteries very quickly
    when using the LCD screen.

    I also find it useful sometimes to keep both eyes open; one eye looking
    through the optical viewfinder, the other eye looking past the camera.

    It feels strange at first, but is less tiring than holding one eye shut
    all the time.

    Also, the eye not pressed against the camera has a wider field of vision
    (especially when using a zoom) so you can see objects that are about to
    come into shot.

    Beef
     
    Beef, Jan 26, 2006
    #19
  20. Digital Photography Now

    Pat Guest

    The image was darker in the RTS, but it was something you could live
    with. It was an okay trade-off for the winder-speed and for the lack
    of shutter bounce. It made for good sports photography.

    When shooting clubs and such, you need to take into account that the
    mirror doesn't get out of the way for the sensor, either, so there is
    some loss of light.

    The main problem will be people use big lenses out at arm's length and
    wondering why the image is blurry!
     
    Pat, Jan 26, 2006
    #20
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