Old Laptop Downgrade With A Locked BIOS

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Guest, Apr 29, 2009.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest

    I am working on a Compaq 17XL360 laptop that my neighbor recently
    obtained and asked me to look at because it was running so slow.
    Investigation revealed that somewhere in its life, someone had decided
    to install Windows XP on it. A further look revealed that it only had
    64 MB of RAM. No surprise why it was running so slow. A check on line
    revealed that this laptop was originally sold with Windows ME. Because
    of the age of the lap top (circa 2000), I recommended that rather than
    trying to turn a sow's ear into a better sow's ear by throwing more RAM
    at it, that he let me put Windows 98 SE on it instead. He only wants it
    for email and other low horsepower applications so Windows 98 might work
    out with no further investment.

    Now for the reason I am writing. The previous unknown owner put a
    password on the BIOS so I cannot change the boot drive to the CD and
    there is no floppy drive. I first tried to run setup.exe from the 98 CD
    after boot using the XP DOS window but an error message indicated that
    it couldn't be done and that I should boot from a MS-DOS diskette.

    At this point I have two options.

    I could try to reset the CMOS password with software. My understanding
    however is that on laptops it might corrupt the BIOS because the
    password is on an EEPROM. I am not sure how true that is, but since it
    is not my laptop, I am not sure I want to take a chance. It has a
    Phoenix 4.0 Rel. 6.0.7 BIOS dated 8-18-2000. I have already tried the
    recommended passwords of CMOS, BIOS, phoenix, and PHOENIX with no luck.

    The other alternative is that I could try to figure out a way to install
    Windows 98 other than booting on the CD-ROM drive and completely ignore
    the BIOS password problem. Perhaps I could find a program that will do
    a "format /s C:" from the XP DOS window but take the OS from a CD. The
    only thing is that if I mess up, there is a good chance he could end up
    with XP gone (as bad as it is with 64 MB of RAM) and not have Windows 98
    installed either.

    Any suggestions?
    Guest, Apr 29, 2009
    #1
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  2. Guest

    PeeCee Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I am working on a Compaq 17XL360 laptop that my neighbor recently
    > obtained and asked me to look at because it was running so slow.
    > Investigation revealed that somewhere in its life, someone had decided
    > to install Windows XP on it. A further look revealed that it only had
    > 64 MB of RAM. No surprise why it was running so slow. A check on line
    > revealed that this laptop was originally sold with Windows ME. Because
    > of the age of the lap top (circa 2000), I recommended that rather than
    > trying to turn a sow's ear into a better sow's ear by throwing more RAM
    > at it, that he let me put Windows 98 SE on it instead. He only wants it
    > for email and other low horsepower applications so Windows 98 might work
    > out with no further investment.
    >
    > Now for the reason I am writing. The previous unknown owner put a
    > password on the BIOS so I cannot change the boot drive to the CD and
    > there is no floppy drive. I first tried to run setup.exe from the 98 CD
    > after boot using the XP DOS window but an error message indicated that
    > it couldn't be done and that I should boot from a MS-DOS diskette.
    >
    > At this point I have two options.
    >
    > I could try to reset the CMOS password with software. My understanding
    > however is that on laptops it might corrupt the BIOS because the
    > password is on an EEPROM. I am not sure how true that is, but since it
    > is not my laptop, I am not sure I want to take a chance. It has a
    > Phoenix 4.0 Rel. 6.0.7 BIOS dated 8-18-2000. I have already tried the
    > recommended passwords of CMOS, BIOS, phoenix, and PHOENIX with no luck.
    >
    > The other alternative is that I could try to figure out a way to install
    > Windows 98 other than booting on the CD-ROM drive and completely ignore
    > the BIOS password problem. Perhaps I could find a program that will do
    > a "format /s C:" from the XP DOS window but take the OS from a CD. The
    > only thing is that if I mess up, there is a good chance he could end up
    > with XP gone (as bad as it is with 64 MB of RAM) and not have Windows 98
    > installed either.
    >
    > Any suggestions?
    >





    The Bios password is probably held in CMOS memory not EEprom.
    If you can find the CMOS battery and disconnect it for 24 hours you should
    be good to go.
    (Check the service manual for it's location, but it's usually under one of
    the covers )

    best
    Paul
    PeeCee, Apr 29, 2009
    #2
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  3. Guest

    Guest

    <> wrote:

    >Now for the reason I am writing. The previous unknown owner put a
    >password on the BIOS so I cannot change the boot drive to the CD and
    >there is no floppy drive.


    Links I have collected

    http://www.dewassoc.com/support/bios/bios_password.htm
    http://labmice.techtarget.com/articles/BIOS_hack.htm
    http://www.elfqrin.com/docs/biospw.html this one I like because it
    shows you how to short the bios
    http://www.uktsupport.co.uk/reference/biosp.htm



    --

    http://whybenormal.today.com/files/2009/04/no-matter-what.jpg
    , Apr 29, 2009
    #3
  4. Guest

    Tony in Oz Guest

    "PeeCee" <> wrote in message
    news:gt8rik$tg1$...
    > <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >>I am working on a Compaq 17XL360 laptop that my neighbor recently
    >> obtained and asked me to look at because it was running so slow.
    >> Investigation revealed that somewhere in its life, someone had decided
    >> to install Windows XP on it. A further look revealed that it only had
    >> 64 MB of RAM. No surprise why it was running so slow. A check on line
    >> revealed that this laptop was originally sold with Windows ME. Because
    >> of the age of the lap top (circa 2000), I recommended that rather than
    >> trying to turn a sow's ear into a better sow's ear by throwing more RAM
    >> at it, that he let me put Windows 98 SE on it instead. He only wants it
    >> for email and other low horsepower applications so Windows 98 might work
    >> out with no further investment.
    >>
    >> Now for the reason I am writing. The previous unknown owner put a
    >> password on the BIOS so I cannot change the boot drive to the CD and
    >> there is no floppy drive. I first tried to run setup.exe from the 98 CD
    >> after boot using the XP DOS window but an error message indicated that
    >> it couldn't be done and that I should boot from a MS-DOS diskette.
    >>
    >> At this point I have two options.
    >>
    >> I could try to reset the CMOS password with software. My understanding
    >> however is that on laptops it might corrupt the BIOS because the
    >> password is on an EEPROM. I am not sure how true that is, but since it
    >> is not my laptop, I am not sure I want to take a chance. It has a
    >> Phoenix 4.0 Rel. 6.0.7 BIOS dated 8-18-2000. I have already tried the
    >> recommended passwords of CMOS, BIOS, phoenix, and PHOENIX with no luck.
    >>
    >> The other alternative is that I could try to figure out a way to install
    >> Windows 98 other than booting on the CD-ROM drive and completely ignore
    >> the BIOS password problem. Perhaps I could find a program that will do
    >> a "format /s C:" from the XP DOS window but take the OS from a CD. The
    >> only thing is that if I mess up, there is a good chance he could end up
    >> with XP gone (as bad as it is with 64 MB of RAM) and not have Windows 98
    >> installed either.
    >>
    >> Any suggestions?
    >>

    >
    >
    >
    >
    > The Bios password is probably held in CMOS memory not EEprom.
    > If you can find the CMOS battery and disconnect it for 24 hours you should
    > be good to go.
    > (Check the service manual for it's location, but it's usually under one of
    > the covers )
    >
    > best
    > Paul

    Hmmm, yes, I just love lappies, they make you spend a good hour
    dismantling them to do a 5 minute job. They kind of remind me of an old
    Citroen GS Club I had once. To change the inboard disc brake pads, one had
    to remove the radiator, starter motor, inlet and exhaust manifolds to get
    access to the pads, take 10 minutes to change the pads, then rerassemble
    everything again. with me not being a qualified mechanic, and not doing it
    all the time, and not having most of the "special" tools required, it took
    me most of the day. I have never owned a Citroen since, and never will.
    Anyway... back to the old laptop....
    Tony in Oz, Apr 29, 2009
    #4
  5. Guest

    G. Morgan Guest

    <> wrote:

    >Any suggestions?


    1. I would try what Paul said about the CMOS battery if it is easily
    accessible first.

    2. I got around a Compaq BIOS p/w once by flashing it but I can't remember if
    I used the DOS version or the Windows one. If there is a Windows flash for it
    I would try that (from XP).

    3. You could yank the HDD and format it on another machine (FAT32) then copy
    the 98se disk to the drive and make it bootable. Put it back in the lappy and
    run setup from a real DOS prompt.

    You could do a combination of #2 & #3 and put the DOS flash utility on the HDD
    while you have it out.
    G. Morgan, Apr 29, 2009
    #5
  6. Guest

    John Holmes Guest

    Tony in Oz "contributed" in 24hoursupport.helpdesk:

    >
    > "PeeCee" <> wrote in message
    > news:gt8rik$tg1$...
    >> <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>>I am working on a Compaq 17XL360 laptop that my neighbor recently
    >>> obtained and asked me to look at because it was running so slow.
    >>> Investigation revealed that somewhere in its life, someone had
    >>> decided to install Windows XP on it. A further look revealed that
    >>> it only had 64 MB of RAM. No surprise why it was running so slow.
    >>> A check on line revealed that this laptop was originally sold with
    >>> Windows ME. Because of the age of the lap top (circa 2000), I
    >>> recommended that rather than trying to turn a sow's ear into a
    >>> better sow's ear by throwing more RAM at it, that he let me put
    >>> Windows 98 SE on it instead. He only wants it for email and other
    >>> low horsepower applications so Windows 98 might work out with no
    >>> further investment.
    >>>
    >>> Now for the reason I am writing. The previous unknown owner put a
    >>> password on the BIOS so I cannot change the boot drive to the CD and
    >>> there is no floppy drive. I first tried to run setup.exe from the
    >>> 98 CD after boot using the XP DOS window but an error message
    >>> indicated that it couldn't be done and that I should boot from a
    >>> MS-DOS diskette.
    >>>
    >>> At this point I have two options.
    >>>
    >>> I could try to reset the CMOS password with software. My
    >>> understanding however is that on laptops it might corrupt the BIOS
    >>> because the password is on an EEPROM. I am not sure how true that
    >>> is, but since it is not my laptop, I am not sure I want to take a
    >>> chance. It has a Phoenix 4.0 Rel. 6.0.7 BIOS dated 8-18-2000. I
    >>> have already tried the recommended passwords of CMOS, BIOS, phoenix,
    >>> and PHOENIX with no luck.
    >>>
    >>> The other alternative is that I could try to figure out a way to
    >>> install Windows 98 other than booting on the CD-ROM drive and
    >>> completely ignore the BIOS password problem. Perhaps I could find a
    >>> program that will do a "format /s C:" from the XP DOS window but
    >>> take the OS from a CD. The only thing is that if I mess up, there
    >>> is a good chance he could end up with XP gone (as bad as it is with
    >>> 64 MB of RAM) and not have Windows 98 installed either.
    >>>
    >>> Any suggestions?
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> The Bios password is probably held in CMOS memory not EEprom.
    >> If you can find the CMOS battery and disconnect it for 24 hours you
    >> should be good to go.
    >> (Check the service manual for it's location, but it's usually under
    >> one of the covers )
    >>
    >> best
    >> Paul

    > Hmmm, yes, I just love lappies, they make you spend a good
    > hour
    > dismantling them to do a 5 minute job. They kind of remind me of an
    > old Citroen GS Club I had once. To change the inboard disc brake pads,
    > one had to remove the radiator, starter motor, inlet and exhaust
    > manifolds to get access to the pads, take 10 minutes to change the
    > pads, then rerassemble everything again. with me not being a qualified
    > mechanic, and not doing it all the time, and not having most of the
    > "special" tools required, it took me most of the day. I have never
    > owned a Citroen since, and never will. Anyway... back to the old
    > laptop....
    >
    >
    >


    LOL, you're right. But that happened a lot with French cars. The reason
    was: in the 70's and 80's there were 3 plants in France making car-
    engines. The automobile brands (Peugeot, Renault and Citroen) bought
    those engines and then had to build a car around it. I was a car mechanic
    those days and it was horrible to service those cars. Another example was
    the Peugeot 106. If you had to adjust the valves you had to lift the car,
    with one mecanic under the car holding the distance plates and the other
    one with his head in the engine compartment to do the adjusting. This
    service had to be done every 3 months. Allthough today they are better
    organized I'll NEVER buy a French car in my life.

    --
    <snip>
    John Holmes, Apr 29, 2009
    #6
  7. Guest

    walter Guest

    John Holmes wrote:

    <snip>

    > LOL, you're right. But that happened a lot with French cars. The
    > reason was: in the 70's and 80's there were 3 plants in France making
    > car- engines. The automobile brands (Peugeot, Renault and Citroen)
    > bought those engines and then had to build a car around it. I was a
    > car mechanic those days and it was horrible to service those cars.
    > Another example was the Peugeot 106. If you had to adjust the valves
    > you had to lift the car, with one mecanic under the car holding the
    > distance plates and the other one with his head in the engine
    > compartment to do the adjusting. This service had to be done every 3
    > months. Allthough today they are better organized I'll NEVER buy a
    > French car in my life.


    I too spent some time as a mechanic. I remember back in the 80's Renault
    assembled a vehicle (I can't remember whether it was the Fuego, or the
    LeCar) such that the "easiest" way to replace the starter was to pull the
    engine. Generally speaking, by the time the starter went, the cost to
    replace it was more than the vehicle was worth. LOL! Not to be outdone,
    about a decade or so later, Cadillac came out with the "Northstar" engine.
    In order to replace the starter in one of those, you had to pull the intake
    manifold. I'll never forget the first time I put one on a lift. I must
    have spent 15 minutes looking for the damn thing. Finally, thinking I'd
    gone blind, I dropped it down and followed the positive battery cable
    straight INTO the engine?! Had to crack the Chilton right then. Sure
    enough, the starter was located in the trough between the block and the
    intake. With "thinking" like that ..... It's no wonder GM is about to go
    tits-up.
    walter, Apr 29, 2009
    #7
  8. Guest

    Evan Platt Guest

    On Tue, 28 Apr 2009 21:53:20 -0400, <> wrote:

    >I am working on a Compaq 17XL360 laptop that my neighbor recently
    >obtained and asked me to look at because it was running so slow.


    Hmm.. For once, chucktards "reset the bios" and Dan C's "format your
    hard drive" suggestion may work...
    --
    To reply via e-mail, remove The Obvious from my e-mail address.
    Evan Platt, Apr 29, 2009
    #8
  9. Guest

    XS11E Guest

    Re: Old Laptop Downgrade With A Locked BIOS

    "PeeCee" <> wrote:

    > The Bios password is probably held in CMOS memory not EEprom.
    > If you can find the CMOS battery and disconnect it for 24 hours
    > you should be good to go.
    > (Check the service manual for it's location, but it's usually
    > under one of the covers )


    That's the best suggestion but be aware that access to the CMOS battery
    probably involves major disassembly. I happen to have service manuals
    on CD for most older HP/Compaq laptops that I purchased on Ebay, I'd be
    willing to copy and share but IIRC you can buy them yourself for about
    what postage on a CD would cost!

    Search Ebay for the manual specific to your laptop and ask your
    neighbor to buy it for you.


    NOTE: HP/Compaq notebooks are held together with billions and billions
    of sub microscopic black screws (OK, I'm exaggerating a little...) so
    be SURE not to work on it over a dark carpet or any spotted floor
    covering! Trust me on this, please!!!



    --
    XS11E, Killing all posts from Google Groups
    The Usenet Improvement Project:
    http://improve-usenet.org
    XS11E, Apr 29, 2009
    #9
  10. Guest

    PeeCee Guest

    "Tony in Oz" <> wrote in message
    news:poTJl.7158$...
    >
    > "PeeCee" <> wrote in message
    > news:gt8rik$tg1$...
    >> <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>>I am working on a Compaq 17XL360 laptop that my neighbor recently
    >>> obtained and asked me to look at because it was running so slow.
    >>> Investigation revealed that somewhere in its life, someone had decided
    >>> to install Windows XP on it. A further look revealed that it only had
    >>> 64 MB of RAM. No surprise why it was running so slow. A check on line
    >>> revealed that this laptop was originally sold with Windows ME. Because
    >>> of the age of the lap top (circa 2000), I recommended that rather than
    >>> trying to turn a sow's ear into a better sow's ear by throwing more RAM
    >>> at it, that he let me put Windows 98 SE on it instead. He only wants it
    >>> for email and other low horsepower applications so Windows 98 might work
    >>> out with no further investment.
    >>>
    >>> Now for the reason I am writing. The previous unknown owner put a
    >>> password on the BIOS so I cannot change the boot drive to the CD and
    >>> there is no floppy drive. I first tried to run setup.exe from the 98 CD
    >>> after boot using the XP DOS window but an error message indicated that
    >>> it couldn't be done and that I should boot from a MS-DOS diskette.
    >>>
    >>> At this point I have two options.
    >>>
    >>> I could try to reset the CMOS password with software. My understanding
    >>> however is that on laptops it might corrupt the BIOS because the
    >>> password is on an EEPROM. I am not sure how true that is, but since it
    >>> is not my laptop, I am not sure I want to take a chance. It has a
    >>> Phoenix 4.0 Rel. 6.0.7 BIOS dated 8-18-2000. I have already tried the
    >>> recommended passwords of CMOS, BIOS, phoenix, and PHOENIX with no luck.
    >>>
    >>> The other alternative is that I could try to figure out a way to install
    >>> Windows 98 other than booting on the CD-ROM drive and completely ignore
    >>> the BIOS password problem. Perhaps I could find a program that will do
    >>> a "format /s C:" from the XP DOS window but take the OS from a CD. The
    >>> only thing is that if I mess up, there is a good chance he could end up
    >>> with XP gone (as bad as it is with 64 MB of RAM) and not have Windows 98
    >>> installed either.
    >>>
    >>> Any suggestions?
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> The Bios password is probably held in CMOS memory not EEprom.
    >> If you can find the CMOS battery and disconnect it for 24 hours you
    >> should be good to go.
    >> (Check the service manual for it's location, but it's usually under one
    >> of the covers )
    >>
    >> best
    >> Paul

    > Hmmm, yes, I just love lappies, they make you spend a good hour
    > dismantling them to do a 5 minute job. They kind of remind me of an old
    > Citroen GS Club I had once. To change the inboard disc brake pads, one had
    > to remove the radiator, starter motor, inlet and exhaust manifolds to get
    > access to the pads, take 10 minutes to change the pads, then rerassemble
    > everything again. with me not being a qualified mechanic, and not doing it
    > all the time, and not having most of the "special" tools required, it took
    > me most of the day. I have never owned a Citroen since, and never will.
    > Anyway... back to the old laptop....
    >




    Yea Tony, been there, done that.
    Though in my case it was a 1964 ID19 and a 1970 D20.
    The ID19 lost a tooth of the crown wheel and cracked the diff case when it
    jambed between the bits.
    Thank god I was mechanically adept & saved a lot of cash by pulling the
    power unit etc myself.
    Loved that car great ride, 'very' economical, clocked at over 110MPH (it had
    dome top pistons)

    Sold the ID19 when I got the D20 cheap.
    That one required a full head job, valves, rockers etc.
    Not so keen on that one, was allways a bit harsh & the poorly repaired front
    chassis rail allways annoyed me.
    (previous owner ran into a tree)

    In the end it was the constant maintenance required that go to me.
    Every weekend there was something to 'fix' as bad as the British Leyland
    cars of the time.
    Bought a 'Mazda' got my weekends back.

    best
    Paul.
    PeeCee, Apr 29, 2009
    #10
  11. Guest

    John Holmes Guest

    walter "contributed" in 24hoursupport.helpdesk:

    > John Holmes wrote:
    >
    > <snip>
    >
    >> LOL, you're right. But that happened a lot with French cars. The
    >> reason was: in the 70's and 80's there were 3 plants in France making
    >> car- engines. The automobile brands (Peugeot, Renault and Citroen)
    >> bought those engines and then had to build a car around it. I was a
    >> car mechanic those days and it was horrible to service those cars.
    >> Another example was the Peugeot 106. If you had to adjust the valves
    >> you had to lift the car, with one mecanic under the car holding the
    >> distance plates and the other one with his head in the engine
    >> compartment to do the adjusting. This service had to be done every 3
    >> months. Allthough today they are better organized I'll NEVER buy a
    >> French car in my life.

    >
    > I too spent some time as a mechanic. I remember back in the 80's
    > Renault assembled a vehicle (I can't remember whether it was the
    > Fuego, or the LeCar) such that the "easiest" way to replace the
    > starter was to pull the engine. Generally speaking, by the time the
    > starter went, the cost to replace it was more than the vehicle was
    > worth. LOL! Not to be outdone, about a decade or so later, Cadillac
    > came out with the "Northstar" engine. In order to replace the starter
    > in one of those, you had to pull the intake manifold. I'll never
    > forget the first time I put one on a lift. I must have spent 15
    > minutes looking for the damn thing. Finally, thinking I'd gone blind,
    > I dropped it down and followed the positive battery cable straight
    > INTO the engine?! Had to crack the Chilton right then. Sure enough,
    > the starter was located in the trough between the block and the
    > intake. With "thinking" like that ..... It's no wonder GM is about to
    > go tits-up.
    >
    >
    >


    That's why I'm driving Mercedes for the past 20+ years. Never let me down
    just for a second.

    --
    <snip>
    John Holmes, Apr 29, 2009
    #11
  12. Guest

    Guest Guest

    In article <>,
    says...

    Snip
    >
    > Now for the reason I am writing. The previous unknown owner put a
    > password on the BIOS so I cannot change the boot drive to the CD and
    > there is no floppy drive. I first tried to run setup.exe from the 98 CD
    > after boot using the XP DOS window but an error message indicated that
    > it couldn't be done and that I should boot from a MS-DOS diskette.
    >


    Snip


    Thanks for all the responses. I have read them all, even the ones about
    the cars, although I have not worked much on cars since my teens and
    early 20s when I owned a 64 Falcon Futura with the 260 V8 and a four
    speed. At least I have not worked on them by choice since then ;-).

    I did talk to the neighbor about putting in more RAM when I first found
    out it only had 64 MB but he did not want to invest any money. He is
    retired and I think this was given to him. He just wants to make it work
    as best we can.

    As for chasing down CMOS the battery, I did take a laptop apart once for
    my brother-in-law to fix the keyboard and resolder the power connector
    that had broken lose from the board, but that was done with the
    condition that it was not working so what harm could I do. If I didn't
    get it back together, no great loss. That is not the case here. I am
    friendly with the neighbor but this is definitely a case of do what you
    can, but above all, do no harm. I won't be taking this one apart.

    As it turns out I had my head up and locked. It has been so long since
    I played with Windows 98 I had forgotten that it needed a boot disk to
    install. I knew there was boot floppy but for some reason I thought the
    CD booted as well. Apparently that is not the case.

    I found an iso image (Win98SEnoram.iso) on the web, created a bootable
    CD, and found the PC would indeed boot up from the CD drive. I then
    formatted C:, loaded the install CD and installed Windows 98 SE. It
    does make a difference. It might not be the latest and greatest but it
    runs a lot quicker on 64 MB than XP.

    My latest problem is making the internal NIC to work. I found the
    driver for it on the HP/Compaq web site (SP21022.EXE) and it installs
    fine, but that is as far as it goes. Windows reports that "This Device
    is Working Properly" in Device Manager but I have no link light on the
    switch that it connects to and I am sure the cable and switch are OK.
    WINIPCFG.EXE tries to connect on renew but the only error reported is
    that no DHCP server could be found, which is what you might expect with
    no link light.

    I did find some old paperwork in the laptop case that suggests that a
    previous owner might have used it with wireless so perhaps the NIC is
    broken, or he disabled it in the BIOS that I still cannot get into. On
    the other hand, if it was disabled why would Device Manager indicate it
    was working properly?

    I seem to recall when I was working with Win 98 regularly that there
    were often some winsock problems, but I suspect that is stretch. It is
    however a place to start. I have done about all the tinkering I can
    think of to do with the current configuration.

    Again thanks for your responses. They are really appreciated and if you
    have any words of wisdom on my latest tribulations, I would love to hear
    them.
    Guest, Apr 30, 2009
    #12
  13. Guest

    Tony in Oz Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In article <>,
    > says...
    >
    > Snip
    >>
    >> Now for the reason I am writing. The previous unknown owner put a
    >> password on the BIOS so I cannot change the boot drive to the CD and
    >> there is no floppy drive. I first tried to run setup.exe from the 98 CD
    >> after boot using the XP DOS window but an error message indicated that
    >> it couldn't be done and that I should boot from a MS-DOS diskette.
    >>

    >
    > Snip
    >
    >
    > Thanks for all the responses. I have read them all, even the ones about
    > the cars, although I have not worked much on cars since my teens and
    > early 20s when I owned a 64 Falcon Futura with the 260 V8 and a four
    > speed. At least I have not worked on them by choice since then ;-).
    >
    > I did talk to the neighbor about putting in more RAM when I first found
    > out it only had 64 MB but he did not want to invest any money. He is
    > retired and I think this was given to him. He just wants to make it work
    > as best we can.
    >
    > As for chasing down CMOS the battery, I did take a laptop apart once for
    > my brother-in-law to fix the keyboard and resolder the power connector
    > that had broken lose from the board, but that was done with the
    > condition that it was not working so what harm could I do. If I didn't
    > get it back together, no great loss. That is not the case here. I am
    > friendly with the neighbor but this is definitely a case of do what you
    > can, but above all, do no harm. I won't be taking this one apart.
    >
    > As it turns out I had my head up and locked. It has been so long since
    > I played with Windows 98 I had forgotten that it needed a boot disk to
    > install. I knew there was boot floppy but for some reason I thought the
    > CD booted as well. Apparently that is not the case.
    >
    > I found an iso image (Win98SEnoram.iso) on the web, created a bootable
    > CD, and found the PC would indeed boot up from the CD drive. I then
    > formatted C:, loaded the install CD and installed Windows 98 SE. It
    > does make a difference. It might not be the latest and greatest but it
    > runs a lot quicker on 64 MB than XP.
    >
    > My latest problem is making the internal NIC to work. I found the
    > driver for it on the HP/Compaq web site (SP21022.EXE) and it installs
    > fine, but that is as far as it goes. Windows reports that "This Device
    > is Working Properly" in Device Manager but I have no link light on the
    > switch that it connects to and I am sure the cable and switch are OK.
    > WINIPCFG.EXE tries to connect on renew but the only error reported is
    > that no DHCP server could be found, which is what you might expect with
    > no link light.
    >
    > I did find some old paperwork in the laptop case that suggests that a
    > previous owner might have used it with wireless so perhaps the NIC is
    > broken, or he disabled it in the BIOS that I still cannot get into. On
    > the other hand, if it was disabled why would Device Manager indicate it
    > was working properly?
    >
    > I seem to recall when I was working with Win 98 regularly that there
    > were often some winsock problems, but I suspect that is stretch. It is
    > however a place to start. I have done about all the tinkering I can
    > think of to do with the current configuration.
    >
    > Again thanks for your responses. They are really appreciated and if you
    > have any words of wisdom on my latest tribulations, I would love to hear
    > them.
    >
    >


    I would go for a windows 200 pro install, it should run fine on the
    RAM available.
    Have you tried passwords "admin", "Admin", "ADMIN", variations of
    "password" or "pword"?
    Tony in Oz, Apr 30, 2009
    #13
  14. Guest

    Guest Guest

    In article <WxaKl.7330$>,
    says...
    >
    > <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > In article <>,
    > > says...
    > >
    > > Snip
    > >>
    > >> Now for the reason I am writing. The previous unknown owner put a
    > >> password on the BIOS so I cannot change the boot drive to the CD and
    > >> there is no floppy drive. I first tried to run setup.exe from the 98 CD
    > >> after boot using the XP DOS window but an error message indicated that
    > >> it couldn't be done and that I should boot from a MS-DOS diskette.
    > >>

    > >
    > > Snip
    > >
    > >
    > > Thanks for all the responses. I have read them all, even the ones about
    > > the cars, although I have not worked much on cars since my teens and
    > > early 20s when I owned a 64 Falcon Futura with the 260 V8 and a four
    > > speed. At least I have not worked on them by choice since then ;-).
    > >
    > > I did talk to the neighbor about putting in more RAM when I first found
    > > out it only had 64 MB but he did not want to invest any money. He is
    > > retired and I think this was given to him. He just wants to make it work
    > > as best we can.
    > >
    > > As for chasing down CMOS the battery, I did take a laptop apart once for
    > > my brother-in-law to fix the keyboard and resolder the power connector
    > > that had broken lose from the board, but that was done with the
    > > condition that it was not working so what harm could I do. If I didn't
    > > get it back together, no great loss. That is not the case here. I am
    > > friendly with the neighbor but this is definitely a case of do what you
    > > can, but above all, do no harm. I won't be taking this one apart.
    > >
    > > As it turns out I had my head up and locked. It has been so long since
    > > I played with Windows 98 I had forgotten that it needed a boot disk to
    > > install. I knew there was boot floppy but for some reason I thought the
    > > CD booted as well. Apparently that is not the case.
    > >
    > > I found an iso image (Win98SEnoram.iso) on the web, created a bootable
    > > CD, and found the PC would indeed boot up from the CD drive. I then
    > > formatted C:, loaded the install CD and installed Windows 98 SE. It
    > > does make a difference. It might not be the latest and greatest but it
    > > runs a lot quicker on 64 MB than XP.
    > >
    > > My latest problem is making the internal NIC to work. I found the
    > > driver for it on the HP/Compaq web site (SP21022.EXE) and it installs
    > > fine, but that is as far as it goes. Windows reports that "This Device
    > > is Working Properly" in Device Manager but I have no link light on the
    > > switch that it connects to and I am sure the cable and switch are OK.
    > > WINIPCFG.EXE tries to connect on renew but the only error reported is
    > > that no DHCP server could be found, which is what you might expect with
    > > no link light.
    > >
    > > I did find some old paperwork in the laptop case that suggests that a
    > > previous owner might have used it with wireless so perhaps the NIC is
    > > broken, or he disabled it in the BIOS that I still cannot get into. On
    > > the other hand, if it was disabled why would Device Manager indicate it
    > > was working properly?
    > >
    > > I seem to recall when I was working with Win 98 regularly that there
    > > were often some winsock problems, but I suspect that is stretch. It is
    > > however a place to start. I have done about all the tinkering I can
    > > think of to do with the current configuration.
    > >
    > > Again thanks for your responses. They are really appreciated and if you
    > > have any words of wisdom on my latest tribulations, I would love to hear
    > > them.
    > >
    > >

    >
    > I would go for a windows 200 pro install, it should run fine on the
    > RAM available.
    > Have you tried passwords "admin", "Admin", "ADMIN", variations of
    > "password" or "pword"?
    >
    >
    >

    I had tried "password" and "admin" but not any of the variations. A
    good thought though and I will see what happens. As far as the internal
    NIC goes, I was able to ping 127.0.0.1 and everything seems right but
    still no link light. I found an old PCMCIA network card kicking around
    and tried that and it worked right out of the gate. I am going to
    donate that to the cause and consider the internal NIC out of service.
    No sense tilting at windmills if there is an easier solution.

    Thanks for your help.
    Guest, Apr 30, 2009
    #14
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