Off Topic Question: Tombstone

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by cal, Aug 30, 2004.

  1. cal

    cal Guest

    Okay, I think I've posted this question before and the reason to post
    again is that I didn't get an answer the last time!

    Yea, I know this is probably not the correct forum to post to, but
    then which one would be?

    Anyway, movie buffs…

    In the movie Tombstone, with Kurt Russell, Val Kilmer, Dana Delany
    (yum!), and Michael Biehn, in a scene early on in the bar when "Ringo"
    (Biehn) has his confrontation with "Doc Holiday" (Kilmer), the two
    square off spouting something in Latin.

    Does anyone know the translation into English of what they are saying?
    Any Latin buffs out there? (Besides you Latin lovers? ;-) I watched
    the movie a few weeks ago and once again, this is driving me crazy!

    cal
    cal, Aug 30, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. "cal" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    <<Okay, I think I've posted this question before and the reason to post
    again is that I didn't get an answer the last time!>>

    <<Yea, I know this is probably not the correct forum to post to, but
    then which one would be?>>

    <<Anyway, movie buffs.>>

    <<In the movie Tombstone, with Kurt Russell, Val Kilmer, Dana Delany
    (yum!), and Michael Biehn, in a scene early on in the bar when "Ringo"
    (Biehn) has his confrontation with "Doc Holiday" (Kilmer), the two
    square off spouting something in Latin.

    <<Does anyone know the translation into English of what they are saying?
    Any Latin buffs out there? (Besides you Latin lovers? ;-) I watched the
    movie a few weeks ago and once again, this is driving me crazy! cal>>



    Background: As Wyatt Earp (Kurt Russell) runs the Faro table in a
    crowded saloon, with an inebriated Doc Holliday (Val Kilmer) standing
    by, a group of cowboys enters noisily, led by Curly Bill Brocius (Powers
    Boothe) and Johnny Ringo (Michael Biehn). Introductions are made (so to
    speak), and Doc makes a comment about Johnny...

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Doc: He reminds me of... Me. Now I really hate him.

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Wyatt: [To Curly Bill and Johnny, holding up hands in placatory
    gesture.] He's drunk.

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

    [Doc takes another drink from his tin cup.]

    Doc: In vino veritas. / Wine loosens the tongue.

    "There are sleeping drunks and fighting drunks and quiet drunks and
    talkative drunks. In vino veritas, an old Roman proverb, with the
    literal meaning 'in wine the truth', tells us that people under the
    influence of wine or other spirits will say things they ordinarily try
    to conceal." 1

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Ringo: Age quod agis. / Pay attention to what you are doing.

    (Or, in this case, "You'd better be careful" or "Watch what you say".)

    "Age quod agis, literally 'do what you are doing', is excellent advice
    for those who become careless in their work as well as for those who
    fail to do what they are supposed to do." 2

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Doc: Credat Iudaeus Apella, non ego. / Tell it to the Marines, not me.

    This phrase comes from a work by Horace; literally, I believe that this
    reads "Let the Jew Apella believe it; I will not." Roget's Thesaurus
    entry #497 (absurdity) gives "Credat Judaeus Apella" the loose
    translation "Tell it to the Marines", while entry #485 (unbelief)
    suggests "Let those believe who may."

    "Iudaeus" is sometimes spelled "Judaeus".

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Ringo: Iuventus stultorum... [he indicates his revolver] ...magister. /
    Youth is the teacher of fools.

    "Iuventus" is sometimes spelled "juventus".

    or...

    Ringo: Eventus stultorum... [he indicates his revolver] ...magister. /
    Fools must be taught by experience.

    (You decide which is correct.)

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Doc: [Half-whispering with heightened intensity.] In pace requiescat! /
    Rest in peace!

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------
    Johnny proceeds to draw his revolver and gives an impressive
    demonstration of his dexterity in handling and twirling it; Doc answers
    with a repetition of the same moves, except using a tin cup instead of a
    revolver. Everyone enjoys the joke and the conflict is over for now.

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

    1. Ehrlich, Eugene: Amo, Amas, Amat and More (Harper and Row, 1985),
    p. 164

    2. Ehrlich, Eugene: Amo, Amas, Amat and More (Harper and Row, 1985),
    p. 34


    http://jaguar.dacc.cc.il.us/~jeff/tombstone-latin.html


    http://members.cox.net/tombstone/latin.html
    One-Shot Scot, Aug 30, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. cal

    cal Guest

    Hey, thanks man! Now I can sleep at night once more!

    cal



    "One-Shot Scot" <> wrote in message news:<>...
    > "cal" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > <<Okay, I think I've posted this question before and the reason to post
    > again is that I didn't get an answer the last time!>>
    >
    > <<Yea, I know this is probably not the correct forum to post to, but
    > then which one would be?>>
    >
    > <<Anyway, movie buffs.>>
    >
    > <<In the movie Tombstone, with Kurt Russell, Val Kilmer, Dana Delany
    > (yum!), and Michael Biehn, in a scene early on in the bar when "Ringo"
    > (Biehn) has his confrontation with "Doc Holiday" (Kilmer), the two
    > square off spouting something in Latin.
    >
    > <<Does anyone know the translation into English of what they are saying?
    > Any Latin buffs out there? (Besides you Latin lovers? ;-) I watched the
    > movie a few weeks ago and once again, this is driving me crazy! cal>>
    >
    >
    >
    > Background: As Wyatt Earp (Kurt Russell) runs the Faro table in a
    > crowded saloon, with an inebriated Doc Holliday (Val Kilmer) standing
    > by, a group of cowboys enters noisily, led by Curly Bill Brocius (Powers
    > Boothe) and Johnny Ringo (Michael Biehn). Introductions are made (so to
    > speak), and Doc makes a comment about Johnny...
    >
    > ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    >
    > Doc: He reminds me of... Me. Now I really hate him.
    >
    > ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    >
    > Wyatt: [To Curly Bill and Johnny, holding up hands in placatory
    > gesture.] He's drunk.
    >
    > ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    >
    > [Doc takes another drink from his tin cup.]
    >
    > Doc: In vino veritas. / Wine loosens the tongue.
    >
    > "There are sleeping drunks and fighting drunks and quiet drunks and
    > talkative drunks. In vino veritas, an old Roman proverb, with the
    > literal meaning 'in wine the truth', tells us that people under the
    > influence of wine or other spirits will say things they ordinarily try
    > to conceal." 1
    >
    > ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    >
    > Ringo: Age quod agis. / Pay attention to what you are doing.
    >
    > (Or, in this case, "You'd better be careful" or "Watch what you say".)
    >
    > "Age quod agis, literally 'do what you are doing', is excellent advice
    > for those who become careless in their work as well as for those who
    > fail to do what they are supposed to do." 2
    >
    > ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    >
    > Doc: Credat Iudaeus Apella, non ego. / Tell it to the Marines, not me.
    >
    > This phrase comes from a work by Horace; literally, I believe that this
    > reads "Let the Jew Apella believe it; I will not." Roget's Thesaurus
    > entry #497 (absurdity) gives "Credat Judaeus Apella" the loose
    > translation "Tell it to the Marines", while entry #485 (unbelief)
    > suggests "Let those believe who may."
    >
    > "Iudaeus" is sometimes spelled "Judaeus".
    >
    > ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    >
    > Ringo: Iuventus stultorum... [he indicates his revolver] ...magister. /
    > Youth is the teacher of fools.
    >
    > "Iuventus" is sometimes spelled "juventus".
    >
    > or...
    >
    > Ringo: Eventus stultorum... [he indicates his revolver] ...magister. /
    > Fools must be taught by experience.
    >
    > (You decide which is correct.)
    >
    > ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    >
    > Doc: [Half-whispering with heightened intensity.] In pace requiescat! /
    > Rest in peace!
    >
    > -----------------------------------------------------------------------
    > Johnny proceeds to draw his revolver and gives an impressive
    > demonstration of his dexterity in handling and twirling it; Doc answers
    > with a repetition of the same moves, except using a tin cup instead of a
    > revolver. Everyone enjoys the joke and the conflict is over for now.
    >
    > ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    >
    > 1. Ehrlich, Eugene: Amo, Amas, Amat and More (Harper and Row, 1985),
    > p. 164
    >
    > 2. Ehrlich, Eugene: Amo, Amas, Amat and More (Harper and Row, 1985),
    > p. 34
    >
    >
    > http://jaguar.dacc.cc.il.us/~jeff/tombstone-latin.html
    >
    >
    > http://members.cox.net/tombstone/latin.html
    cal, Aug 31, 2004
    #3
  4. "cal" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hey, thanks man! Now I can sleep at night once more!
    >
    > cal



    Sola lingua bona est lingua mortua.

    (The only good language is a dead language.)
    One-Shot Scot, Aug 31, 2004
    #4
  5. > "Iudaeus" is sometimes spelled "Judaeus".

    'But in the Latin alphabet, "Jehovah" begins with an "I"'.
    Michael S. Cooper, Sep 1, 2004
    #5
  6. Michael S. Cooper wrote:

    >> "Iudaeus" is sometimes spelled "Judaeus".

    >
    > 'But in the Latin alphabet, "Jehovah" begins with an "I"'.


    And "the penitent man kneels before God"... and then rolls away quickly
    from the scything blade. (Apparently the definition of "penitent" has
    changed somewhat through the ages.)

    :)

    doug

    --
    "Well, I thought I knew all about everything, but I was wrong..."
    --Robyn Hitchcock
    Douglas Bailey, Sep 1, 2004
    #6
    1. Advertising

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