OEM vs Retail version of Windows XP???

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Bud Light, Jan 6, 2005.

  1. Bud Light

    Bud Light Guest

    Any benefits of getting one or the other except for the big price
    difference? I can get either the Home or Pro edition but OEM will cost be
    about $200 less.
    Bud Light, Jan 6, 2005
    #1
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  2. Bud Light

    Nik Schlein Guest

    OEM means Original Equipment Manufacturer. Or people like Dell or HP put it
    on there. They also pay and maintain technical support for OEM products.
    Retail means you pay more but Microsoft handles the technical support. If
    you are an experienced computer user then OEM is the way to go. If you
    aren't as good. Or just like having tech support available then Retail is
    the way to go.


    "Bud Light" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > Any benefits of getting one or the other except for the big price
    > difference? I can get either the Home or Pro edition but OEM will cost be
    > about $200 less.
    >
    >
    >
    Nik Schlein, Jan 6, 2005
    #2
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  3. Bud Light

    Toolman Tim Guest

    "Bud Light" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    | Any benefits of getting one or the other except for the big price
    | difference? I can get either the Home or Pro edition but OEM will cost be
    | about $200 less.
    |
    Big difference, legally. In order to qualify for an OEM license for XP, you
    are supposed to be a computer manufacturer. The OEM version is not to be
    sold apart from hardware. So if you build or upgrade a computer you should
    qualify for an OEM license. *However* that license then belongs permanently
    to only that one specific computer. If it dies, and you go buy/build another
    computer, that license is not valid for the new system.

    A retail version of XP does not have that limitation. You can legally remove
    it from a previous system and install it on a new one.

    The upgrade version follows the licensing of th version being upgraded: if
    you are upgrading and OEM, the upgrade is non-transferable. If you are
    upgrading a retail version, the upgrade is transferable.

    I believe those are the rules...as best I understand them <g>
    Toolman Tim, Jan 7, 2005
    #3
  4. Bud Light

    Bud Light Guest

    Thanks.

    "Nik Schlein" <> wrote in message
    news:zhkDd.622353$wV.189436@attbi_s54...
    > OEM means Original Equipment Manufacturer. Or people like Dell or HP put

    it
    > on there. They also pay and maintain technical support for OEM products.
    > Retail means you pay more but Microsoft handles the technical support. If
    > you are an experienced computer user then OEM is the way to go. If you
    > aren't as good. Or just like having tech support available then Retail is
    > the way to go.
    >
    >
    > "Bud Light" <> wrote in message
    > news:p...
    > > Any benefits of getting one or the other except for the big price
    > > difference? I can get either the Home or Pro edition but OEM will cost

    be
    > > about $200 less.
    > >
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
    Bud Light, Jan 7, 2005
    #4
  5. Bud Light

    Bud Light Guest

    Thanks.

    "Toolman Tim" <> wrote in message
    news:3YlDd.317$...
    > "Bud Light" <> wrote in message
    > news:p...
    > | Any benefits of getting one or the other except for the big price
    > | difference? I can get either the Home or Pro edition but OEM will cost

    be
    > | about $200 less.
    > |
    > Big difference, legally. In order to qualify for an OEM license for XP,

    you
    > are supposed to be a computer manufacturer. The OEM version is not to be
    > sold apart from hardware. So if you build or upgrade a computer you should
    > qualify for an OEM license. *However* that license then belongs

    permanently
    > to only that one specific computer. If it dies, and you go buy/build

    another
    > computer, that license is not valid for the new system.
    >
    > A retail version of XP does not have that limitation. You can legally

    remove
    > it from a previous system and install it on a new one.
    >
    > The upgrade version follows the licensing of th version being upgraded: if
    > you are upgrading and OEM, the upgrade is non-transferable. If you are
    > upgrading a retail version, the upgrade is transferable.
    >
    > I believe those are the rules...as best I understand them <g>
    >
    >
    Bud Light, Jan 7, 2005
    #5
  6. "Toolman Tim" <> wrote in message
    news:3YlDd.317$...
    > "Bud Light" <> wrote in message
    > news:p...
    > | Any benefits of getting one or the other except for the big price
    > | difference? I can get either the Home or Pro edition but OEM will cost
    > be
    > | about $200 less.
    > |
    > Big difference, legally. In order to qualify for an OEM license for XP,
    > you
    > are supposed to be a computer manufacturer.


    That's not correct. Anyone can buy OEM software and do it legally within the
    license agreement. If you want to buy a three-pack, you don't even have to
    purchase qualifying hardware. In November I (and about 200 others) spent
    half a day going over the ins and outs of licensing with Microsoft in
    Atlanta.


    > The OEM version is not to be
    > sold apart from hardware.


    See above. Also note that Microsoft says a "power cord", since it is a
    required component and not "peripheral" to the system, qualifies as
    hardware.

    > So if you build or upgrade a computer you should
    > qualify for an OEM license. *However* that license then belongs
    > permanently
    > to only that one specific computer.


    That is correct. OEM licenses are *technically* non-transferrable. Good luck
    enforcing that one.
    Oxford Systems, Jan 7, 2005
    #6
  7. Bud Light

    Toolman Tim Guest

    "Oxford Systems" <> wrote in message
    news:potDd.7$...
    | "Toolman Tim" <> wrote in message
    | news:3YlDd.317$...
    | > "Bud Light" <> wrote in message
    | > news:p...
    | > | Any benefits of getting one or the other except for the big price
    | > | difference? I can get either the Home or Pro edition but OEM will
    cost
    | > be
    | > | about $200 less.
    | > |
    | > Big difference, legally. In order to qualify for an OEM license for XP,
    | > you
    | > are supposed to be a computer manufacturer.
    |
    | That's not correct. Anyone can buy OEM software and do it legally within
    the
    | license agreement. If you want to buy a three-pack, you don't even have to
    | purchase qualifying hardware. In November I (and about 200 others) spent
    | half a day going over the ins and outs of licensing with Microsoft in
    | Atlanta.
    |
    |
    | > The OEM version is not to be
    | > sold apart from hardware.
    |
    | See above. Also note that Microsoft says a "power cord", since it is a
    | required component and not "peripheral" to the system, qualifies as
    | hardware.
    |
    | > So if you build or upgrade a computer you should
    | > qualify for an OEM license. *However* that license then belongs
    | > permanently
    | > to only that one specific computer.
    |
    | That is correct. OEM licenses are *technically* non-transferrable. Good
    luck
    | enforcing that one.
    |
    heh heh ... I know what you mean there. Technically, since all my hardware
    upgrades have been in the same case, I guess I'd be okay...but it certainly
    isn't the same computer anymore <g>
    Toolman Tim, Jan 7, 2005
    #7
  8. Bud Light

    Ron Martell Guest

    "Bud Light" <> wrote:

    >Any benefits of getting one or the other except for the big price
    >difference? I can get either the Home or Pro edition but OEM will cost be
    >about $200 less.
    >
    >


    See http://onlinehelp.bc.ca/oem_software for detailed information.

    Good luck


    Ron Martell Duncan B.C. Canada
    --
    Microsoft MVP
    On-Line Help Computer Service
    http://onlinehelp.bc.ca

    "The reason computer chips are so small is computers don't eat much."
    Ron Martell, Jan 8, 2005
    #8
  9. Bud Light

    Bud Light Guest

    "Ron Martell" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "Bud Light" <> wrote:
    >
    > >Any benefits of getting one or the other except for the big price
    > >difference? I can get either the Home or Pro edition but OEM will cost

    be
    > >about $200 less.
    > >
    > >

    >
    > See http://onlinehelp.bc.ca/oem_software for detailed information.
    >
    > Good luck
    >
    >
    > Ron Martell Duncan B.C. Canada
    > --
    > Microsoft MVP
    > On-Line Help Computer Service
    > http://onlinehelp.bc.ca
    >
    > "The reason computer chips are so small is computers don't eat much."


    Thanks for the help.
    Bud Light, Jan 8, 2005
    #9
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