OEM License

Discussion in 'Windows 64bit' started by RichM, Dec 14, 2007.

  1. RichM

    RichM Guest

    Hello,

    I saw online an ad for XP Pro x64 and it says, "No Retail Box (OEM)". The
    price is way below many other sites. In plain english, can someone explain
    what OEM means in this context? I know it stands for Original Equipment
    Manufacturer, but
    1) what does it mean,
    2) why doesn't come in the box, and
    3) is it the same as more expensive products that do come in a retail box?

    I look forward to a simple and understandable explanation.

    Thank you.

    Here's the link if anyone is interested
    http://software.pricegrabber.com/wi...arch=xp professional x64 edition/skd=1/qlty=o
     
    RichM, Dec 14, 2007
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. RichM

    S.SubZero Guest

    1. OEM is software intended for the PC maker to install, not end
    users
    2. It doesn't come in a box because that is added expense the end
    user will never see
    3. It is "the same" product in that it's functionally the same. for
    32-bit XP, the OEM and retail do not share the same keys, so there are
    OEM keys and retail keys. With XP64 this is not an issue, as XP64 is
    *only* sold as an OEM product. There's no such thing as a boxed,
    retail XP64.
     
    S.SubZero, Dec 14, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. RichM

    RichM Guest

    Okay, thanks. That all makes sense. There's a wide range of prices for this
    software. I see anywhere from $72 to $140. So even at $140 you don't get a
    retail box. I guess the only confusion is the term "Original Equipment
    Manufacturer." That sounds more like the company that made the disc and OS,
    but now I understand it's the company that uses the OS on their equipment,
    like Dell, Gateway, etc.

    Thanks again.

    "S.SubZero" wrote:

    > 1. OEM is software intended for the PC maker to install, not end
    > users
    > 2. It doesn't come in a box because that is added expense the end
    > user will never see
    > 3. It is "the same" product in that it's functionally the same. for
    > 32-bit XP, the OEM and retail do not share the same keys, so there are
    > OEM keys and retail keys. With XP64 this is not an issue, as XP64 is
    > *only* sold as an OEM product. There's no such thing as a boxed,
    > retail XP64.
    >
     
    RichM, Dec 14, 2007
    #3
  4. RichM

    R. C. White Guest

    Hi, Rich.

    As S.Subzero said, you don't get a box with the OEM version. If a system
    builder ordered 1,000 copies, he'd have a thousand boxes to throw away.
    :>( But the missing box explains only a small part of the price difference.

    The "bits" on the "generic" OEM disk are identical to the ones on the retail
    disk. The major OEMs (Dell, Gateway) often add custom drivers, splash
    screens and other touches, but the operating system itself should be
    identical. The big difference is in the licensing - and the support. The
    OEM versions are much less expensive because of volume discounts AND because
    they do not come with support by Microsoft. The OE Manufacturer assumes the
    burden of support. If you have a problem with the Windows pre-installed on
    your HP or Dell, you call HP or Dell, not Microsoft. If YOU are the builder
    (the OEM) of YOUR system, then YOU are the Tech Support Department
    responsible for it. Not ASUS or Seagate - or Microsoft.

    RC
    --
    R. C. White, CPA
    San Marcos, TX

    Microsoft Windows MVP
    (Running Windows Live Mail 2008 in Vista Ultimate x64)

    "RichM" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Okay, thanks. That all makes sense. There's a wide range of prices for
    > this
    > software. I see anywhere from $72 to $140. So even at $140 you don't get a
    > retail box. I guess the only confusion is the term "Original Equipment
    > Manufacturer." That sounds more like the company that made the disc and
    > OS,
    > but now I understand it's the company that uses the OS on their equipment,
    > like Dell, Gateway, etc.
    >
    > Thanks again.
    >
    > "S.SubZero" wrote:
    >
    >> 1. OEM is software intended for the PC maker to install, not end
    >> users
    >> 2. It doesn't come in a box because that is added expense the end
    >> user will never see
    >> 3. It is "the same" product in that it's functionally the same. for
    >> 32-bit XP, the OEM and retail do not share the same keys, so there are
    >> OEM keys and retail keys. With XP64 this is not an issue, as XP64 is
    >> *only* sold as an OEM product. There's no such thing as a boxed,
    >> retail XP64.
     
    R. C. White, Dec 14, 2007
    #4
  5. RichM

    Ken Triebold Guest

    You're right about the system builder being responsible for OS support on
    OEM versions. I get most (all) of my support from forums like this one, so
    the OEM version is not at much of a disadvantage in this area.


    "R. C. White" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi, Rich.
    >
    > As S.Subzero said, you don't get a box with the OEM version. If a system
    > builder ordered 1,000 copies, he'd have a thousand boxes to throw away.
    > :>( But the missing box explains only a small part of the price
    > difference.
    >
    > The "bits" on the "generic" OEM disk are identical to the ones on the
    > retail disk. The major OEMs (Dell, Gateway) often add custom drivers,
    > splash screens and other touches, but the operating system itself should
    > be identical. The big difference is in the licensing - and the support.
    > The OEM versions are much less expensive because of volume discounts AND
    > because they do not come with support by Microsoft. The OE Manufacturer
    > assumes the burden of support. If you have a problem with the Windows
    > pre-installed on your HP or Dell, you call HP or Dell, not Microsoft. If
    > YOU are the builder (the OEM) of YOUR system, then YOU are the Tech
    > Support Department responsible for it. Not ASUS or Seagate - or
    > Microsoft.
    >
    > RC
    > --
    > R. C. White, CPA
    > San Marcos, TX
    >
    > Microsoft Windows MVP
    > (Running Windows Live Mail 2008 in Vista Ultimate x64)
    >
    > "RichM" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Okay, thanks. That all makes sense. There's a wide range of prices for
    >> this
    >> software. I see anywhere from $72 to $140. So even at $140 you don't get
    >> a
    >> retail box. I guess the only confusion is the term "Original Equipment
    >> Manufacturer." That sounds more like the company that made the disc and
    >> OS,
    >> but now I understand it's the company that uses the OS on their
    >> equipment,
    >> like Dell, Gateway, etc.
    >>
    >> Thanks again.
    >>
    >> "S.SubZero" wrote:
    >>
    >>> 1. OEM is software intended for the PC maker to install, not end
    >>> users
    >>> 2. It doesn't come in a box because that is added expense the end
    >>> user will never see
    >>> 3. It is "the same" product in that it's functionally the same. for
    >>> 32-bit XP, the OEM and retail do not share the same keys, so there are
    >>> OEM keys and retail keys. With XP64 this is not an issue, as XP64 is
    >>> *only* sold as an OEM product. There's no such thing as a boxed,
    >>> retail XP64.

    >
     
    Ken Triebold, Dec 14, 2007
    #5
  6. RichM

    RichM Guest

    Okay, thanks. Makes even more sense now. Support on these boards is typically
    as good or better than what you get if you call tech support at the big
    vendors and less annoying (you odn't have to repeat your service tag #,
    address, etc. etc.). There is a wide range of prices for the OS online and
    that's a good thing.

    Thanks again.

    "R. C. White" wrote:

    > Hi, Rich.
    >
    > As S.Subzero said, you don't get a box with the OEM version. If a system
    > builder ordered 1,000 copies, he'd have a thousand boxes to throw away.
    > :>( But the missing box explains only a small part of the price difference.
    >
    > The "bits" on the "generic" OEM disk are identical to the ones on the retail
    > disk. The major OEMs (Dell, Gateway) often add custom drivers, splash
    > screens and other touches, but the operating system itself should be
    > identical. The big difference is in the licensing - and the support. The
    > OEM versions are much less expensive because of volume discounts AND because
    > they do not come with support by Microsoft. The OE Manufacturer assumes the
    > burden of support. If you have a problem with the Windows pre-installed on
    > your HP or Dell, you call HP or Dell, not Microsoft. If YOU are the builder
    > (the OEM) of YOUR system, then YOU are the Tech Support Department
    > responsible for it. Not ASUS or Seagate - or Microsoft.
    >
    > RC
    > --
    > R. C. White, CPA
    > San Marcos, TX
    >
    > Microsoft Windows MVP
    > (Running Windows Live Mail 2008 in Vista Ultimate x64)
    >
    > "RichM" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Okay, thanks. That all makes sense. There's a wide range of prices for
    > > this
    > > software. I see anywhere from $72 to $140. So even at $140 you don't get a
    > > retail box. I guess the only confusion is the term "Original Equipment
    > > Manufacturer." That sounds more like the company that made the disc and
    > > OS,
    > > but now I understand it's the company that uses the OS on their equipment,
    > > like Dell, Gateway, etc.
    > >
    > > Thanks again.
    > >
    > > "S.SubZero" wrote:
    > >
    > >> 1. OEM is software intended for the PC maker to install, not end
    > >> users
    > >> 2. It doesn't come in a box because that is added expense the end
    > >> user will never see
    > >> 3. It is "the same" product in that it's functionally the same. for
    > >> 32-bit XP, the OEM and retail do not share the same keys, so there are
    > >> OEM keys and retail keys. With XP64 this is not an issue, as XP64 is
    > >> *only* sold as an OEM product. There's no such thing as a boxed,
    > >> retail XP64.

    >
     
    RichM, Dec 14, 2007
    #6
  7. RichM

    DP Guest

    You've gotten some good responses. However, I would add one caveat in the
    form of a question:
    Who is the retailer for this product?
    A company like Newegg can be trusted. Not a plug, just my experience. I'm
    sure others on the group can suggest other vendors for OEM (and maybe they
    should).
    However, you need to be aware of the numerous scam artists out there, like
    those who sell Photoshop for $9 or or Office for $29 or something like that,
    claiming it's OEM. It would take forever here to try to give you tips as to
    how to tell the legitimate vendors who sell OEM products and those scam
    artists.
    You might also look at the list of suggested vendors at planetamd64.com .


    "RichM" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hello,
    >
    > I saw online an ad for XP Pro x64 and it says, "No Retail Box (OEM)". The
    > price is way below many other sites. In plain english, can someone explain
    > what OEM means in this context? I know it stands for Original Equipment
    > Manufacturer, but
    > 1) what does it mean,
    > 2) why doesn't come in the box, and
    > 3) is it the same as more expensive products that do come in a retail box?
    >
    > I look forward to a simple and understandable explanation.
    >
    > Thank you.
    >
    > Here's the link if anyone is interested
    > http://software.pricegrabber.com/wi...arch=xp professional x64 edition/skd=1/qlty=o
    >
     
    DP, Dec 16, 2007
    #7
  8. RichM

    Mark Guest

    While I don't have any real issues with OEM, please keep the following in
    mind:

    1. If buying on-line, make sure it is a reputable dealer.
    Look at the disk carefully before you install.
    I've ended up with someone's VOLUME license instead of an OEM license
    and that only leads to trouble.
    Some "vendors" sell you their already activated OEM license.
    2. OEM can only be installed on one machine.
    Once activated, do not plan on any upgrades to the motherboard or
    processor.
    Other upgrades will typically require a phone call with a person to
    re-activate.
    You cannot uninstall and move the product to another computer.

    "DP" <> wrote in message
    news:OD%...
    >
    >
    > You've gotten some good responses. However, I would add one caveat in the
    > form of a question:
    > Who is the retailer for this product?
    > A company like Newegg can be trusted. Not a plug, just my experience. I'm
    > sure others on the group can suggest other vendors for OEM (and maybe they
    > should).
    > However, you need to be aware of the numerous scam artists out there, like
    > those who sell Photoshop for $9 or or Office for $29 or something like

    that,
    > claiming it's OEM. It would take forever here to try to give you tips as

    to
    > how to tell the legitimate vendors who sell OEM products and those scam
    > artists.
    > You might also look at the list of suggested vendors at planetamd64.com .
    >
    >
    > "RichM" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Hello,
    > >
    > > I saw online an ad for XP Pro x64 and it says, "No Retail Box (OEM)".

    The
    > > price is way below many other sites. In plain english, can someone

    explain
    > > what OEM means in this context? I know it stands for Original Equipment
    > > Manufacturer, but
    > > 1) what does it mean,
    > > 2) why doesn't come in the box, and
    > > 3) is it the same as more expensive products that do come in a retail

    box?
    > >
    > > I look forward to a simple and understandable explanation.
    > >
    > > Thank you.
    > >
    > > Here's the link if anyone is interested
    > >

    http://software.pricegrabber.com/wi...arch=xp professional x64 edition/skd=1/qlty=o
    > >

    >
     
    Mark, Dec 17, 2007
    #8
  9. The main differences between OEM copies and retail copies of any Windows is
    the license and upgrade functionality. An OEM license grants the right to
    install on one machine (not transferrable to a new machine later) and an OEM
    cd is designed for installing the Windows as a new OS (upgrading is
    blocked). If are putting together a new machine and understand that another
    new machine later will require a new copy of Windows for it, then OEM is how
    you might go.

    Of course XP Pro x64 is only OEM so any copy you buy will not be
    transferrable to a new machine. Given the low price compared to what a
    retail box would cost you, you can afford three OEM copies for the same
    money it would have cost you to get a retail edition if they were made so
    having to buy another one for a later machine is not deal-breaker.

    btw, the reason it is only OEM is that there is no way it can be sold as a
    standalone item in a place like Best Buy due to the situation with devices
    and drivers at the time x64 went Gold (2005). For that reason MS decided to
    put it in the hands of system builders because they would ensure that
    everything worked before shipping a machine. An impulse purchaser in a
    retail store would be in over his head and his printer, modem, etc. would
    not work. This would be very bad PR for MS and real disservice to the
    consumer.

    "RichM" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hello,
    >
    > I saw online an ad for XP Pro x64 and it says, "No Retail Box (OEM)". The
    > price is way below many other sites. In plain english, can someone explain
    > what OEM means in this context? I know it stands for Original Equipment
    > Manufacturer, but
    > 1) what does it mean,
    > 2) why doesn't come in the box, and
    > 3) is it the same as more expensive products that do come in a retail box?
    >
    > I look forward to a simple and understandable explanation.
    >
    > Thank you.
    >
    > Here's the link if anyone is interested
    > http://software.pricegrabber.com/wi...arch=xp professional x64 edition/skd=1/qlty=o
    >
     
    Colin Barnhorst, Dec 17, 2007
    #9
  10. RichM

    Tony Harding Guest

    DP wrote:
    >
    >
    > You've gotten some good responses. However, I would add one caveat in
    > the form of a question:
    > Who is the retailer for this product?
    > A company like Newegg can be trusted. Not a plug, just my experience.
    > I'm sure others on the group can suggest other vendors for OEM (and
    > maybe they should).


    I bought my copy of x64 from Cietdirect, received a CD and product key
    which activated without a problem. They were on the cheaper side of
    prices, i.e., $88.

    http://www.cietdirect.com/product_special_detail.php?s=1&id=163
     
    Tony Harding, Dec 18, 2007
    #10
  11. RichM

    Tony Harding Guest

    Mark wrote:
    > While I don't have any real issues with OEM, please keep the following in
    > mind:
    >
    > 1. If buying on-line, make sure it is a reputable dealer.
    > Look at the disk carefully before you install.
    > I've ended up with someone's VOLUME license instead of an OEM license
    > and that only leads to trouble.
    > Some "vendors" sell you their already activated OEM license.
    > 2. OEM can only be installed on one machine.


    Per: the terms of the license with Microsoft.

    > Once activated, do not plan on any upgrades to the motherboard or
    > processor.


    I think Mark is being overly cautious here, I've upgraded a Dell system
    with a new mobo & processor (Intel quad) and had no problems activating
    I can remember.

    > Other upgrades will typically require a phone call with a person to
    > re-activate.
    > You cannot uninstall and move the product to another computer.


    Again, per: the terms of the license agreement with Microsoft. An OEM
    license for Windows is tied to the system on which it's first installed,
    if the computer dies, so does the Windows' license. 'Don't know what the
    "system" is exactly, i.e., it's not the mobo. I'm sure someone else here
    can explain MS licensing more fully.
     
    Tony Harding, Dec 18, 2007
    #11
  12. I have to agree with Mark on this one. Vista is proving far less tolerant
    of hardware changes before triggering reactivation.

    "Tony Harding" <> wrote in message
    news:4767f4e3$0$31152$...
    > Mark wrote:
    >> While I don't have any real issues with OEM, please keep the following in
    >> mind:
    >>
    >> 1. If buying on-line, make sure it is a reputable dealer.
    >> Look at the disk carefully before you install.
    >> I've ended up with someone's VOLUME license instead of an OEM
    >> license
    >> and that only leads to trouble.
    >> Some "vendors" sell you their already activated OEM license.
    >> 2. OEM can only be installed on one machine.

    >
    > Per: the terms of the license with Microsoft.
    >
    >> Once activated, do not plan on any upgrades to the motherboard or
    >> processor.

    >
    > I think Mark is being overly cautious here, I've upgraded a Dell system
    > with a new mobo & processor (Intel quad) and had no problems activating I
    > can remember.
    >
    >> Other upgrades will typically require a phone call with a person
    >> to
    >> re-activate.
    >> You cannot uninstall and move the product to another computer.

    >
    > Again, per: the terms of the license agreement with Microsoft. An OEM
    > license for Windows is tied to the system on which it's first installed,
    > if the computer dies, so does the Windows' license. 'Don't know what the
    > "system" is exactly, i.e., it's not the mobo. I'm sure someone else here
    > can explain MS licensing more fully.
     
    Colin Barnhorst, Dec 18, 2007
    #12
  13. RichM

    DP Guest

    I note that the site says:
    "CD's state Student Media / Work at Home Media. This software installs the
    same and has all the same functions of software that comes in a retail box."

    I'm not sure if the license for "student" media puts restrictions on your
    use of it. But then I guess the restrictions are only as good as the
    enforcement and I doubt MS is going to bother looking for violators of
    something like XP x64.

    Another thing from that website strikes me. This language: "Full Version -
    NOT an upgrade version but will perform an upgrade on 95% of computers. Buy
    a full version at an upgrade price."

    You cannot do an upgrade from 32-bit to 64-bit, AFIK. I hope lots of their
    customers didn't lose data trying to "upgrade."

    Those two things lead me to believe the company tends to play fast and
    loose with facts. So I would be wary about the kinds of things I buy from
    them. You seem to have been fortunate to get a decent price and I assume you
    haven't had any problems (which is good since the company says they won't
    take the product back if you do).




    "Tony Harding" <> wrote in message
    news:4767f23b$0$31160$...
    > DP wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >> You've gotten some good responses. However, I would add one caveat in the
    >> form of a question:
    >> Who is the retailer for this product?
    >> A company like Newegg can be trusted. Not a plug, just my experience. I'm
    >> sure others on the group can suggest other vendors for OEM (and maybe
    >> they should).

    >
    > I bought my copy of x64 from Cietdirect, received a CD and product key
    > which activated without a problem. They were on the cheaper side of
    > prices, i.e., $88.
    >
    > http://www.cietdirect.com/product_special_detail.php?s=1&id=163
     
    DP, Dec 19, 2007
    #13
  14. RichM

    DP Guest

    It's strange.
    I changed my athlon processor to an Opteron and Vista didn't complain.
    But a few months later, when I doubled the memory from 2gb to 4, I had to
    reactivate.
    Go figure.



    "Colin Barnhorst" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I have to agree with Mark on this one. Vista is proving far less tolerant
    >of hardware changes before triggering reactivation.
    >
    > "Tony Harding" <> wrote in message
    > news:4767f4e3$0$31152$...
    >> Mark wrote:
    >>> While I don't have any real issues with OEM, please keep the following
    >>> in
    >>> mind:
    >>>
    >>> 1. If buying on-line, make sure it is a reputable dealer.
    >>> Look at the disk carefully before you install.
    >>> I've ended up with someone's VOLUME license instead of an OEM
    >>> license
    >>> and that only leads to trouble.
    >>> Some "vendors" sell you their already activated OEM license.
    >>> 2. OEM can only be installed on one machine.

    >>
    >> Per: the terms of the license with Microsoft.
    >>
    >>> Once activated, do not plan on any upgrades to the motherboard
    >>> or
    >>> processor.

    >>
    >> I think Mark is being overly cautious here, I've upgraded a Dell system
    >> with a new mobo & processor (Intel quad) and had no problems activating I
    >> can remember.
    >>
    >>> Other upgrades will typically require a phone call with a person
    >>> to
    >>> re-activate.
    >>> You cannot uninstall and move the product to another computer.

    >>
    >> Again, per: the terms of the license agreement with Microsoft. An OEM
    >> license for Windows is tied to the system on which it's first installed,
    >> if the computer dies, so does the Windows' license. 'Don't know what the
    >> "system" is exactly, i.e., it's not the mobo. I'm sure someone else here
    >> can explain MS licensing more fully.

    >
     
    DP, Dec 19, 2007
    #14
  15. The cpu was one hardware characteristic and the memory was the second. XP
    would not have required reactivation with just two of the hc flags set but
    Vista apparently can. XP would not trigger reactivation until the seventh
    hc was changed. You could change one of the hc's many times but only the
    first time counted. If you changed the ram by at least 64mb the hc flag was
    set and you could go back and change the memory as many times more as you
    wanted without any further effect. But Vista is less tolerant. Recently
    even a device driver change could trigger reactivation (that one was a bug,
    though).

    "DP" <> wrote in message
    news:eC$...
    > It's strange.
    > I changed my athlon processor to an Opteron and Vista didn't complain.
    > But a few months later, when I doubled the memory from 2gb to 4, I had to
    > reactivate.
    > Go figure.
    >
    >
    >
    > "Colin Barnhorst" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >>I have to agree with Mark on this one. Vista is proving far less tolerant
    >>of hardware changes before triggering reactivation.
    >>
    >> "Tony Harding" <> wrote in message
    >> news:4767f4e3$0$31152$...
    >>> Mark wrote:
    >>>> While I don't have any real issues with OEM, please keep the following
    >>>> in
    >>>> mind:
    >>>>
    >>>> 1. If buying on-line, make sure it is a reputable dealer.
    >>>> Look at the disk carefully before you install.
    >>>> I've ended up with someone's VOLUME license instead of an OEM
    >>>> license
    >>>> and that only leads to trouble.
    >>>> Some "vendors" sell you their already activated OEM license.
    >>>> 2. OEM can only be installed on one machine.
    >>>
    >>> Per: the terms of the license with Microsoft.
    >>>
    >>>> Once activated, do not plan on any upgrades to the motherboard
    >>>> or
    >>>> processor.
    >>>
    >>> I think Mark is being overly cautious here, I've upgraded a Dell system
    >>> with a new mobo & processor (Intel quad) and had no problems activating
    >>> I can remember.
    >>>
    >>>> Other upgrades will typically require a phone call with a
    >>>> person to
    >>>> re-activate.
    >>>> You cannot uninstall and move the product to another computer.
    >>>
    >>> Again, per: the terms of the license agreement with Microsoft. An OEM
    >>> license for Windows is tied to the system on which it's first installed,
    >>> if the computer dies, so does the Windows' license. 'Don't know what the
    >>> "system" is exactly, i.e., it's not the mobo. I'm sure someone else here
    >>> can explain MS licensing more fully.

    >>

    >
     
    Colin Barnhorst, Dec 19, 2007
    #15
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