Odd size desktop power supply?.

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by tony sayer, Mar 25, 2011.

  1. tony sayer

    tony sayer Guest

    We have a rather odd specialist desktop PC that got a knackered power
    unit. This wouldn't normally be a problem but on this series of units
    they had a slightly lower in height power unit.

    Where most all of them are 140 mm high and 85 mm wide and around 150 mm
    deep (front to back) this one is 120 mm high! (85 x 120 x 150).
    A standard one will stick out of the top of the case which isn't
    required;!. Anyone know what they are called and know of anywhere in the
    UK you can obtain one from they have the normal fixings and IEC input
    and output lads just need this reduced height!..

    cheers..
    --
    Tony Sayer
    tony sayer, Mar 25, 2011
    #1
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  2. tony sayer

    jkn Guest

    Hi Tony

    probably best to search (on eBay etc.) based on the make/model of the
    PC, I'd have thought, eg. 'Fujitsu Scenic S2' (one desktop machine I
    know with an unusual PSU).

    J^n
    jkn, Mar 25, 2011
    #2
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  3. tony sayer

    Tabby Guest

    On Mar 25, 8:09 pm, tony sayer <> wrote:
    > We have a rather odd specialist desktop PC that got a knackered power
    > unit. This wouldn't normally be a problem but on this series of units
    > they had a slightly lower in height power unit.
    >
    > Where most all of them are 140 mm high and 85 mm wide and around  150 mm
    > deep (front to back) this one is 120 mm high! (85 x 120 x 150).
    > A standard one will stick out of the top of the case which isn't
    > required;!. Anyone know what they are called and know of anywhere in the
    > UK you can obtain one from they have the normal fixings and IEC input
    > and output lads just need this reduced height!..
    >
    > cheers..


    One possible answer is: angle grinder. I've seen plenty of PC PSUs
    where the innards don't occupy the full height of the box. Take care
    to avoid any metal filings, eg by decasing the pcb and reinstalling
    once cut. As many cases are made as 2 Us, it will very much affect the
    case reassembly, but it can all be patched up with duct tape.


    NT
    Tabby, Mar 25, 2011
    #3
  4. tony sayer

    Paul Guest

    tony sayer wrote:
    > We have a rather odd specialist desktop PC that got a knackered power
    > unit. This wouldn't normally be a problem but on this series of units
    > they had a slightly lower in height power unit.
    >
    > Where most all of them are 140 mm high and 85 mm wide and around 150 mm
    > deep (front to back) this one is 120 mm high! (85 x 120 x 150).
    > A standard one will stick out of the top of the case which isn't
    > required;!. Anyone know what they are called and know of anywhere in the
    > UK you can obtain one from they have the normal fixings and IEC input
    > and output lads just need this reduced height!..
    >
    > cheers..


    Does the supply have a model number on the label ?

    Usually, there is a ratings label on the supply, and
    some kind of model number. An Internet search on the
    model number, will sometimes dig up a vendor selling a
    generic substitute for it.

    Paul
    Paul, Mar 25, 2011
    #4
  5. tony sayer

    Lee Guest

    On 25/03/2011 20:45, Tabby wrote:

    >
    > One possible answer is: angle grinder. I've seen plenty of PC PSUs
    > where the innards don't occupy the full height of the box. Take care
    > to avoid any metal filings, eg by decasing the pcb and reinstalling
    > once cut. As many cases are made as 2 Us, it will very much affect the
    > case reassembly, but it can all be patched up with duct tape.
    >
    >
    > NT


    Along those lines, wouldn't it be easier to simply transplant the pcb?

    Lee
    Lee, Mar 25, 2011
    #5
  6. tony sayer

    Bob Eager Guest

    On Fri, 25 Mar 2011 20:09:26 +0000, tony sayer wrote:

    > We have a rather odd specialist desktop PC that got a knackered power
    > unit. This wouldn't normally be a problem but on this series of units
    > they had a slightly lower in height power unit.
    >
    > Where most all of them are 140 mm high and 85 mm wide and around 150 mm
    > deep (front to back) this one is 120 mm high! (85 x 120 x 150). A
    > standard one will stick out of the top of the case which isn't
    > required;!. Anyone know what they are called and know of anywhere in the
    > UK you can obtain one from they have the normal fixings and IEC input
    > and output lads just need this reduced height!..


    Probably one of the five variants of SFX/SFX12V PSUs; if not, one of
    those will fit although you might need to drill one or two new fixing
    holes at different centres.

    How easy they are to come by...I haven't looked.

    What wattage?



    --
    Use the BIG mirror service in the UK:
    http://www.mirrorservice.org

    *lightning protection* - a w_tom conductor
    Bob Eager, Mar 25, 2011
    #6
  7. tony sayer

    Tabby Guest

    On Mar 25, 9:07 pm, Lee <> wrote:
    > On 25/03/2011 20:45, Tabby wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > One possible answer is: angle grinder. I've seen plenty of PC PSUs
    > > where the innards don't occupy the full height of the box. Take care
    > > to avoid any metal filings, eg by decasing the pcb and reinstalling
    > > once cut. As many cases are made as 2 Us, it will very much affect the
    > > case reassembly, but it can all be patched up with duct tape.

    >
    > > NT

    >
    > Along those lines, wouldn't it be easier to simply transplant the pcb?
    >
    > Lee


    Maybe, the only issue is the mounting points probably wont match. It
    would ease fan mounting.


    NT
    Tabby, Mar 25, 2011
    #7
  8. tony sayer

    Ron Lowe Guest

    On 25/03/2011 20:09, tony sayer wrote:
    >
    > We have a rather odd specialist desktop PC that got a knackered power
    > unit. This wouldn't normally be a problem but on this series of units
    > they had a slightly lower in height power unit.
    >
    > Where most all of them are 140 mm high and 85 mm wide and around 150 mm
    > deep (front to back) this one is 120 mm high! (85 x 120 x 150).
    > A standard one will stick out of the top of the case which isn't
    > required;!. Anyone know what they are called and know of anywhere in the
    > UK you can obtain one from they have the normal fixings and IEC input
    > and output lads just need this reduced height!..
    >
    > cheers..


    Dell boxes can be like that.
    You seem rather coy on naming the actual make/model!

    Go on google / fleabay with the make/model, and you will usually find a
    replacement.

    --
    Ron
    Ron Lowe, Mar 25, 2011
    #8
  9. Why don't you try plugging the Model Number into your search engine's Search
    Box?

    I need a power supply for a Princeton monitor that I own. The model number
    of the power supply is HASU05F. Plugging that into the Search Box of Yahoo!
    gave me a host of hits, some on eBay. The supply I need can be bought for
    $10.25, shipping included.




    "tony sayer" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > We have a rather odd specialist desktop PC that got a knackered power
    > unit. This wouldn't normally be a problem but on this series of units
    > they had a slightly lower in height power unit.
    >
    > Where most all of them are 140 mm high and 85 mm wide and around 150 mm
    > deep (front to back) this one is 120 mm high! (85 x 120 x 150).
    > A standard one will stick out of the top of the case which isn't
    > required;!. Anyone know what they are called and know of anywhere in the
    > UK you can obtain one from they have the normal fixings and IEC input
    > and output lads just need this reduced height!..
    >
    > cheers..
    > --
    > Tony Sayer
    >
    Jeff Strickland, Mar 25, 2011
    #9
  10. tony sayer

    tony sayer Guest

    In article <imj4k9$n2v$>, Ron Lowe <>
    scribeth thus
    >On 25/03/2011 20:09, tony sayer wrote:
    >>
    >> We have a rather odd specialist desktop PC that got a knackered power
    >> unit. This wouldn't normally be a problem but on this series of units
    >> they had a slightly lower in height power unit.
    >>
    >> Where most all of them are 140 mm high and 85 mm wide and around 150 mm
    >> deep (front to back) this one is 120 mm high! (85 x 120 x 150).
    >> A standard one will stick out of the top of the case which isn't
    >> required;!. Anyone know what they are called and know of anywhere in the
    >> UK you can obtain one from they have the normal fixings and IEC input
    >> and output lads just need this reduced height!..
    >>
    >> cheers..

    >
    >Dell boxes can be like that.
    >You seem rather coy on naming the actual make/model!


    Yes well, there simply isn't one this was made up out of component parts
    a while ago now even the power unit hasn't got anything recognisable on
    it!..

    >
    >Go on google / fleabay with the make/model, and you will usually find a
    >replacement.
    >


    Bin there haven't found one!..
    --
    Tony Sayer
    tony sayer, Mar 26, 2011
    #10
  11. tony sayer

    tony sayer Guest

    In article <
    s.com>, Tabby <> scribeth thus
    >On Mar 25, 8:09 pm, tony sayer <> wrote:
    >> We have a rather odd specialist desktop PC that got a knackered power
    >> unit. This wouldn't normally be a problem but on this series of units
    >> they had a slightly lower in height power unit.
    >>
    >> Where most all of them are 140 mm high and 85 mm wide and around  150 mm
    >> deep (front to back) this one is 120 mm high! (85 x 120 x 150).
    >> A standard one will stick out of the top of the case which isn't
    >> required;!. Anyone know what they are called and know of anywhere in the
    >> UK you can obtain one from they have the normal fixings and IEC input
    >> and output lads just need this reduced height!..
    >>
    >> cheers..

    >
    >One possible answer is: angle grinder. I've seen plenty of PC PSUs
    >where the innards don't occupy the full height of the box. Take care
    >to avoid any metal filings, eg by decasing the pcb and reinstalling
    >once cut. As many cases are made as 2 Us, it will very much affect the
    >case reassembly, but it can all be patched up with duct tape.
    >
    >
    >NT


    Now thats the sort of answer only someone on UK DIY could give!, but it
    seems it might be the simplest one as fortunately theres a bit of space
    over the other side of the box so put it there and extend the IEC input
    lead connector we have lot of =panel mounted ones around so job
    effectively done:)..
    --
    Tony Sayer
    tony sayer, Mar 26, 2011
    #11
  12. tony sayer

    tony sayer Guest

    In article <>, Bob Eager
    <> scribeth thus
    >On Fri, 25 Mar 2011 20:09:26 +0000, tony sayer wrote:
    >
    >> We have a rather odd specialist desktop PC that got a knackered power
    >> unit. This wouldn't normally be a problem but on this series of units
    >> they had a slightly lower in height power unit.
    >>
    >> Where most all of them are 140 mm high and 85 mm wide and around 150 mm
    >> deep (front to back) this one is 120 mm high! (85 x 120 x 150). A
    >> standard one will stick out of the top of the case which isn't
    >> required;!. Anyone know what they are called and know of anywhere in the
    >> UK you can obtain one from they have the normal fixings and IEC input
    >> and output lads just need this reduced height!..

    >
    >Probably one of the five variants of SFX/SFX12V PSUs; if not, one of
    >those will fit although you might need to drill one or two new fixing
    >holes at different centres.


    Doesn't quite seem to fit that description..
    >
    >How easy they are to come by...I haven't looked.
    >
    >What wattage?


    Dunno, absolutely no markings on. Seems I will now take another supply
    and fix that over the other side of the case and extend that mains input
    lead etc..

    Cheers all the same..
    >
    >
    >


    --
    Tony Sayer
    tony sayer, Mar 26, 2011
    #12
  13. tony sayer

    Paul Guest

    tony sayer wrote:
    > In article <imj4k9$n2v$>, Ron Lowe <>
    > scribeth thus
    >> On 25/03/2011 20:09, tony sayer wrote:
    >>> We have a rather odd specialist desktop PC that got a knackered power
    >>> unit. This wouldn't normally be a problem but on this series of units
    >>> they had a slightly lower in height power unit.
    >>>
    >>> Where most all of them are 140 mm high and 85 mm wide and around 150 mm
    >>> deep (front to back) this one is 120 mm high! (85 x 120 x 150).
    >>> A standard one will stick out of the top of the case which isn't
    >>> required;!. Anyone know what they are called and know of anywhere in the
    >>> UK you can obtain one from they have the normal fixings and IEC input
    >>> and output lads just need this reduced height!..
    >>>
    >>> cheers..

    >> Dell boxes can be like that.
    >> You seem rather coy on naming the actual make/model!

    >
    > Yes well, there simply isn't one this was made up out of component parts
    > a while ago now even the power unit hasn't got anything recognisable on
    > it!..
    >
    >> Go on google / fleabay with the make/model, and you will usually find a
    >> replacement.
    >>

    >
    > Bin there haven't found one!..


    Do you have a digital camera ?

    It's possible to post a picture of your "puzzle" on imageshack.us
    (being careful to tick the box to prevent them from reducing the
    resolution).

    Are the connectors standard AT ? Or standard ATX with 2x10 or 2x12
    for the main power ?

    To give an example of how big a picture you can post, this is
    a benchmark I posted some time ago.

    http://img829.imageshack.us/img829/842/500gb3500418ascomposite.gif

    You could take pictures from several angles, and then glue them
    all together into one picture.

    Paul
    Paul, Mar 26, 2011
    #13
  14. On Fri, 25 Mar 2011 20:09:26 +0000, tony sayer wrote:

    > Where most all of them are 140 mm high and 85 mm wide and around 150 mm
    > deep (front to back) this one is 120 mm high! (85 x 120 x 150).


    I think one of the old PC's her a had a supply of similar dimensions.
    These things are mass produced to standards so the OEM's can just
    pick what they want and bung it all together. I suggest having a
    google along the lines of power supply size or dimension and seeing
    if you can find what something that size is coded as. Some one has
    already mentioned a few codes, of course even if you know the code if
    this is an old machine you might not be able to find one to buy...

    --
    Cheers
    Dave.
    Dave Liquorice, Mar 26, 2011
    #14
  15. tony sayer

    tony sayer Guest

    >>> Go on google / fleabay with the make/model, and you will usually find a
    >>> replacement.
    >>>

    >>
    >> Bin there haven't found one!..

    >
    >Do you have a digital camera ?
    >
    >It's possible to post a picture of your "puzzle" on imageshack.us
    >(being careful to tick the box to prevent them from reducing the
    >resolution).
    >
    >Are the connectors standard AT ? Or standard ATX with 2x10 or 2x12
    >for the main power ?
    >
    >To give an example of how big a picture you can post, this is
    >a benchmark I posted some time ago.
    >
    >
    > Paul



    Well I took the "Angle grinder" approach as suggested on UK DIY as it
    was prolly quicker!. Gutted the old unit in fact It would have been
    possible to transplant the board from a new unit except that new one had
    a nice large cooling fan. So chopped all the old wiring and soldered the
    mains plug now "chopped off" other end of an IEC kettle lead direct to
    it via the switch, was arranged to switch the neutral so now swapped
    that around to live!".,

    Grommeted and tywraped the main cable coming out. Installed the new
    supply fitted well right over the other side of the case made up a small
    bracket a couple of self tapper's which hold it fine, wired and now back
    in service not that "neat "an appearance but very effective:

    Thanks to all who replied:)..

    Cheers...
    --
    Tony Sayer
    tony sayer, Mar 26, 2011
    #15
  16. tony sayer

    Paul Bird Guest

    Jules Richardson wrote:
    > On Fri, 25 Mar 2011 20:09:26 +0000, tony sayer wrote:
    >
    >> We have a rather odd specialist desktop PC that got a knackered power
    >> unit.

    >
    > Is fixing it not an option? The same few things cause most of the
    > faults...
    >


    Given the apparent complexity of a SMPS, and the fact that you can't
    learn much when it's not running what is the usual diagnostic approach?
    Blown caps, burned resistors?

    PB
    Paul Bird, Mar 26, 2011
    #16
  17. tony sayer

    tony sayer Guest

    In article <imkohu$dl8$>, Jules Richardson <jules.richard
    > scribeth thus
    >On Fri, 25 Mar 2011 20:09:26 +0000, tony sayer wrote:
    >
    >> We have a rather odd specialist desktop PC that got a knackered power
    >> unit.

    >
    >Is fixing it not an option? The same few things cause most of the
    >faults...
    >


    No service info at all, not even a circuit diagram?. Where would you
    start?. Caps possibly but the quality of that thing looked cheap anyway
    the new one much better:)..
    --
    Tony Sayer
    tony sayer, Mar 26, 2011
    #17
  18. tony sayer

    tony sayer Guest

    In article <imivj7$vqg$>, Paul <>
    scribeth thus
    >tony sayer wrote:
    >> We have a rather odd specialist desktop PC that got a knackered power
    >> unit. This wouldn't normally be a problem but on this series of units
    >> they had a slightly lower in height power unit.
    >>
    >> Where most all of them are 140 mm high and 85 mm wide and around 150 mm
    >> deep (front to back) this one is 120 mm high! (85 x 120 x 150).
    >> A standard one will stick out of the top of the case which isn't
    >> required;!. Anyone know what they are called and know of anywhere in the
    >> UK you can obtain one from they have the normal fixings and IEC input
    >> and output lads just need this reduced height!..
    >>
    >> cheers..

    >
    >Does the supply have a model number on the label ?
    >
    >Usually, there is a ratings label on the supply, and
    >some kind of model number. An Internet search on the
    >model number, will sometimes dig up a vendor selling a
    >generic substitute for it.
    >
    > Paul


    As mentioned earlier on other NG postings.. No markings none at all.
    Problem now fixed by fitting a new power unit in another location within
    the desktop cabinet PC now back in service:)..
    --
    Tony Sayer
    tony sayer, Mar 26, 2011
    #18
  19. tony sayer wrote:
    > We have a rather odd specialist desktop PC that got a knackered power
    > unit. This wouldn't normally be a problem but on this series of units
    > they had a slightly lower in height power unit.
    >
    > Where most all of them are 140 mm high and 85 mm wide and around 150 mm
    > deep (front to back) this one is 120 mm high! (85 x 120 x 150).
    > A standard one will stick out of the top of the case which isn't
    > required;!. Anyone know what they are called and know of anywhere in the
    > UK you can obtain one from they have the normal fixings and IEC input
    > and output lads just need this reduced height!..
    >

    I see it's too late for this time, but if you Google for a 1U PC power
    supply, you get items like ths one from eBay:-

    http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/1U-MICRO-ATX-...350564&cguid=f3033c5112e0a0aa1731b3c1fff34d08

    That one is 150.0 x 40.5 x 81.5 mm

    --
    Tciao for Now!

    John.
    John Williamson, Mar 26, 2011
    #19
  20. tony sayer

    Ron Lowe Guest

    On 26/03/2011 13:16, Paul Bird wrote:
    > Jules Richardson wrote:
    >> On Fri, 25 Mar 2011 20:09:26 +0000, tony sayer wrote:
    >>
    >>> We have a rather odd specialist desktop PC that got a knackered power
    >>> unit.

    >>
    >> Is fixing it not an option? The same few things cause most of the
    >> faults...
    >>

    >
    > Given the apparent complexity of a SMPS, and the fact that you can't
    > learn much when it's not running what is the usual diagnostic approach?
    > Blown caps, burned resistors?
    >
    > PB


    OK, start here:

    Visulal inspection.
    Bulging caps?
    Blown fuses?
    Burnt components?

    Fuse blown? Blown to buggery, totally blackened?
    -> fault is probably on the input side. Suspect main diode bridge
    rectifier. Check with meter.

    Next:
    Check for over 300vDC on the main reservoir caps.
    If 300ish V on caps, then we move on to the switchers.

    Blown fuse may suggest shorted switching transistor. Check with meter.

    Simple meter check of semiconductor devices on the output dide, looking
    for shorted devices.

    THat's the basics.
    If you need to go deeper, it's time to start tracing circuits etc.

    --
    Ron
    Ron Lowe, Mar 26, 2011
    #20
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