Odd phone call

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Geopelia, Apr 15, 2011.

  1. Geopelia

    Geopelia Guest

    I received an odd phone call today, from somebody whose English and accent
    were so bad that I couldn't understand her.
    I think she was telling me about some program to check one's own computer,
    but although I got her to repeat it she seemed to be gabbling something off
    a script, and it didn't seem to make any sense.

    Has anyone else had a call like that recently? I think it's just the usual
    telemarketing scam, but wonder if it's going the rounds.
    Geopelia, Apr 15, 2011
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. In article <io9f1p$hh9$>, says...
    >
    > I received an odd phone call today, from somebody whose English and accent
    > were so bad that I couldn't understand her.
    > I think she was telling me about some program to check one's own computer,
    > but although I got her to repeat it she seemed to be gabbling something off
    > a script, and it didn't seem to make any sense.
    >
    > Has anyone else had a call like that recently? I think it's just the usual
    > telemarketing scam, but wonder if it's going the rounds.


    No, it's worse than telemarketers, it's con-men. There was an article about it
    in the Herald just a few days ago. They are criminals trying to sucker people
    into letting them siphon your money off. Best thing you can do is just hang up
    on them.

    -P.
    Peter Huebner, Apr 15, 2011
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Geopelia

    Peter Guest

    Geopelia wrote:
    > I received an odd phone call today, from somebody whose English and accent
    > were so bad that I couldn't understand her.
    > I think she was telling me about some program to check one's own computer,
    > but although I got her to repeat it she seemed to be gabbling something
    > off a script, and it didn't seem to make any sense.
    >
    > Has anyone else had a call like that recently? I think it's just the usual
    > telemarketing scam, but wonder if it's going the rounds.


    Yes, it's a known scam ...
    http://www.consumeraffairs.govt.nz/scam-news/scam-alert-32
    Peter, Apr 15, 2011
    #3
  4. Geopelia

    colp Guest

    On Apr 16, 7:28 am, whoisthis <> wrote:
    > In article <io9f1p$>,
    >
    >  "Geopelia" <> wrote:
    > > I received an odd phone call today, from somebody whose English and accent
    > > were so bad that I couldn't understand her.
    > > I think she was telling me about some program to check one's own computer,
    > > but although I got her to repeat it she seemed to be gabbling somethingoff
    > > a script, and it didn't seem to make any sense.

    >
    > > Has anyone else had a call like that recently? I think it's just the usual
    > > telemarketing scam, but wonder if it's going the rounds.

    >
    > Yes its a scam. They are telling you they have been asked by microsoft
    > or who ever to contact you because their monitoring has spotted you have
    > a virus. They will tell you to look in the task manager and lo and
    > behold here is a task running (And its is MEANT to be running and is a
    > legitimate task), they will then use that to confirm you have  virus and
    > you must log onto their web site (which is full of malware), and for
    > only $300 you can download this miraculous program (which is actually a
    > trojan) onto you machine to fix the issue.
    > They now have control over your machine AND have you credit card details.


    There's another scam going around where "couriers" turn up with a box
    for you, and say that they need payment for delivery. The leave with
    your credit card details & you get an empty box.
    colp, Apr 15, 2011
    #4
  5. Geopelia

    Geopelia Guest

    Thanks folks.
    They picked the wrong person, as even if I understood what she was saying, I
    leave everything technical to the computer man.
    But you would think they would choose phone people who sound credible and
    intelligent.

    I did a complete scan with Trend Micro, just to be sure. No virus, just the
    usual cookies which they remove every time.

    That's a good website about scams.

    Thank you
    Geopelia
    Geopelia, Apr 15, 2011
    #5
  6. Geopelia

    Boots Guest

    On Sat, 16 Apr 2011 10:03:07 +1200, Geopelia wrote:

    > But you would think they would choose phone people who sound credible
    > and intelligent.


    If they sounded credible and intelligent and they were taken to court
    then they would be convicted. Because they are so utterly implausible and
    so obviously a scam the courts are more likely to not have any legal
    basis for convicting them.


    --
    "Filtering the Internet is like trying to boil the ocean"
    Boots, Apr 15, 2011
    #6
  7. Geopelia

    Donchano Guest

    On Sat, 16 Apr 2011 00:52:07 +1200, "Geopelia" <>
    shouted from the highest rooftop:

    >I received an odd phone call today, from somebody whose English and accent
    >were so bad that I couldn't understand her.
    >I think she was telling me about some program to check one's own computer,
    >but although I got her to repeat it she seemed to be gabbling something off
    >a script, and it didn't seem to make any sense.
    >
    >Has anyone else had a call like that recently? I think it's just the usual
    >telemarketing scam, but wonder if it's going the rounds.
    >


    Gabbling in bad English? Does Suzie Wong know your telephone number?
    Donchano, Apr 15, 2011
    #7
  8. Geopelia

    colp Guest

    On Apr 16, 10:10 am, Boots <> wrote:
    > On Sat, 16 Apr 2011 10:03:07 +1200, Geopelia wrote:
    > > But you would think they would choose phone people who sound credible
    > > and intelligent.

    >
    > If they sounded credible and intelligent and they were taken to court
    > then they would be convicted. Because they are so utterly implausible and
    > so obviously a scam the courts are more likely to not have any legal
    > basis for convicting them.


    Wrong. Incompetent criminals can be convicted just as easily as
    competent ones.
    colp, Apr 16, 2011
    #8
  9. In article <25aeb9f7-a84b-44bb-8666-28ae19f7bb72
    @o21g2000prh.googlegroups.com>, says...
    >
    > On Apr 16, 7:28 am, whoisthis <> wrote:
    > > In article <io9f1p$>,
    > >
    > >  "Geopelia" <> wrote:
    > > > I received an odd phone call today, from somebody whose English and accent
    > > > were so bad that I couldn't understand her.
    > > > I think she was telling me about some program to check one's own computer,
    > > > but although I got her to repeat it she seemed to be gabbling something off
    > > > a script, and it didn't seem to make any sense.

    > >
    > > > Has anyone else had a call like that recently? I think it's just the usual
    > > > telemarketing scam, but wonder if it's going the rounds.

    > >
    > > Yes its a scam. They are telling you they have been asked by microsoft
    > > or who ever to contact you because their monitoring has spotted you have
    > > a virus. They will tell you to look in the task manager and lo and
    > > behold here is a task running (And its is MEANT to be running and is a
    > > legitimate task), they will then use that to confirm you have  virus and
    > > you must log onto their web site (which is full of malware), and for
    > > only $300 you can download this miraculous program (which is actually a
    > > trojan) onto you machine to fix the issue.
    > > They now have control over your machine AND have you credit card details.

    >
    > There's another scam going around where "couriers" turn up with a box
    > for you, and say that they need payment for delivery. The leave with
    > your credit card details & you get an empty box.


    "Hi, I'm a "courier" and I require COD for an empty box that you didn't
    order. Credit card, please."

    There must be more (or less) to it than that, because as it stands, your
    scenario doesn't seem even remotely plausible.

    Where has this been happening?
    Cilente Laguroto, Apr 16, 2011
    #9
  10. Geopelia

    Lyn Guest

    On Apr 16, 12:52 am, "Geopelia" <> wrote:
    > I received an odd phone call today, from somebody whose English and accent
    > were so bad that I couldn't understand her.
    > I think she was telling me about some program to check one's own computer,
    > but although I got her to repeat it she seemed to be gabbling something off
    > a script, and it didn't seem to make any sense.
    >
    > Has anyone else had a call like that recently? I think it's just the usual
    > telemarketing scam, but wonder if it's going the rounds.


    Yes, its a con, I got one of these phone calls months ago but knew
    enough about computers to spot the lies. Had a bit of a laugh anyway.
    Lyn, Apr 16, 2011
    #10
  11. On Apr 16, 7:28 am, whoisthis <> wrote:
    >  "Geopelia" <> wrote:
    > > I received an odd phone call today, from somebody whose English and accent
    > > were so bad that I couldn't understand her.
    > > I think she was telling me about some program to check one's own computer,
    > > but although I got her to repeat it she seemed to be gabbling somethingoff
    > > a script, and it didn't seem to make any sense.

    >
    > > Has anyone else had a call like that recently? I think it's just the usual
    > > telemarketing scam, but wonder if it's going the rounds.

    >
    > Yes its a scam. They are telling you they have been asked by microsoft
    > or who ever to contact you because their monitoring has spotted you have
    > a virus. They will tell you to look in the task manager and lo and
    > behold here is a task running (And its is MEANT to be running and is a
    > legitimate task), they will then use that to confirm you have  virus and
    > you must log onto their web site (which is full of malware), and for
    > only $300 you can download this miraculous program (which is actually a
    > trojan) onto you machine to fix the issue.
    > They now have control over your machine AND have you credit card details.


    For months now I've been getting emails purportedly from TelstraClear
    claiming variously (1) my computer has been the source of massive
    spamming overseas, (2) I have exceeded my downloading quota, (3) my
    webmail account needs verifiying, and (4) the company is conducting a
    periodical review of accounts - all requiring me to enter my password
    and account details. Some of them were in ridiculously bad English
    and I can dismiss most of them straightaway - my cable modem is
    switched off except when I am actually using it, I have highly-rated
    and paid-for security software, I never download music or videos or
    play games online so my quota is never even approached, and I don't
    even have a webmail account and I'm not sure what it is anyway.
    Needless to say, none of the disasters which they threatened have ever
    happened.

    LW
    Lyndon Watson, Apr 16, 2011
    #11
  12. Geopelia

    Guest

    On Fri, 15 Apr 2011 19:27:10 -0700 (PDT), Lyndon Watson
    <> wrote:

    >On Apr 16, 7:28 am, whoisthis <> wrote:
    >>  "Geopelia" <> wrote:
    >> > I received an odd phone call today, from somebody whose English and accent
    >> > were so bad that I couldn't understand her.
    >> > I think she was telling me about some program to check one's own computer,
    >> > but although I got her to repeat it she seemed to be gabbling something off
    >> > a script, and it didn't seem to make any sense.

    >>
    >> > Has anyone else had a call like that recently? I think it's just the usual
    >> > telemarketing scam, but wonder if it's going the rounds.

    >>
    >> Yes its a scam. They are telling you they have been asked by microsoft
    >> or who ever to contact you because their monitoring has spotted you have
    >> a virus. They will tell you to look in the task manager and lo and
    >> behold here is a task running (And its is MEANT to be running and is a
    >> legitimate task), they will then use that to confirm you have  virus and
    >> you must log onto their web site (which is full of malware), and for
    >> only $300 you can download this miraculous program (which is actually a
    >> trojan) onto you machine to fix the issue.
    >> They now have control over your machine AND have you credit card details.

    >
    >For months now I've been getting emails purportedly from TelstraClear
    >claiming variously (1) my computer has been the source of massive
    >spamming overseas, (2) I have exceeded my downloading quota, (3) my
    >webmail account needs verifiying, and (4) the company is conducting a
    >periodical review of accounts - all requiring me to enter my password
    >and account details. Some of them were in ridiculously bad English
    >and I can dismiss most of them straightaway - my cable modem is
    >switched off except when I am actually using it, I have highly-rated
    >and paid-for security software, I never download music or videos or
    >play games online so my quota is never even approached, and I don't
    >even have a webmail account and I'm not sure what it is anyway.
    >Needless to say, none of the disasters which they threatened have ever
    >happened.
    >
    >LW


    How do you switch off your cable modem, Lyndon?
    , Apr 16, 2011
    #12
  13. Geopelia

    Donchano Guest

    On Sat, 16 Apr 2011 14:46:32 +1200, shouted from
    the highest rooftop:

    >On Fri, 15 Apr 2011 19:27:10 -0700 (PDT), Lyndon Watson
    ><> wrote:

    <snip>
    >>
    >>For months now I've been getting emails purportedly from TelstraClear
    >>claiming variously (1) my computer has been the source of massive
    >>spamming overseas, (2) I have exceeded my downloading quota, (3) my
    >>webmail account needs verifiying, and (4) the company is conducting a
    >>periodical review of accounts - all requiring me to enter my password
    >>and account details. Some of them were in ridiculously bad English
    >>and I can dismiss most of them straightaway - my cable modem is
    >>switched off except when I am actually using it, I have highly-rated
    >>and paid-for security software, I never download music or videos or
    >>play games online so my quota is never even approached, and I don't
    >>even have a webmail account and I'm not sure what it is anyway.
    >>Needless to say, none of the disasters which they threatened have ever
    >>happened.
    >>
    >>LW

    >
    >How do you switch off your cable modem, Lyndon?


    Don't know about Lyndon, but I can switch mine off by:

    1. Removing the power from my modem.

    2. Removing the cable from my modem.

    3. Switching off the power to my modem.

    4. Switching off my Local Area Connection (LAN)

    5. Switching off my computer.
    Donchano, Apr 16, 2011
    #13
  14. Geopelia

    Geopelia Guest

    "Donchano" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > On Sat, 16 Apr 2011 14:46:32 +1200, shouted from
    > the highest rooftop:
    >
    >>On Fri, 15 Apr 2011 19:27:10 -0700 (PDT), Lyndon Watson
    >><> wrote:

    > <snip>
    >>>
    >>>For months now I've been getting emails purportedly from TelstraClear
    >>>claiming variously (1) my computer has been the source of massive
    >>>spamming overseas, (2) I have exceeded my downloading quota, (3) my
    >>>webmail account needs verifiying, and (4) the company is conducting a
    >>>periodical review of accounts - all requiring me to enter my password
    >>>and account details. Some of them were in ridiculously bad English
    >>>and I can dismiss most of them straightaway - my cable modem is
    >>>switched off except when I am actually using it, I have highly-rated
    >>>and paid-for security software, I never download music or videos or
    >>>play games online so my quota is never even approached, and I don't
    >>>even have a webmail account and I'm not sure what it is anyway.
    >>>Needless to say, none of the disasters which they threatened have ever
    >>>happened.
    >>>
    >>>LW

    >>
    >>How do you switch off your cable modem, Lyndon?

    >
    > Don't know about Lyndon, but I can switch mine off by:
    >
    > 1. Removing the power from my modem.
    >
    > 2. Removing the cable from my modem.
    >
    > 3. Switching off the power to my modem.
    >
    > 4. Switching off my Local Area Connection (LAN)
    >
    > 5. Switching off my computer.


    I can't use Standby now, so switch off the computer. But it takes a long
    time to start up, and Trend Micro also takes a long time to get going. I
    wonder how much power I would use if I left it on.

    If the computer is left on, can people download things on to it with
    Broadband please?

    Geopelia

    There were 14 updates yesterday, I think from Microsoft, which took up a lot
    of my Broadband.
    Geopelia, Apr 16, 2011
    #14
  15. Geopelia

    Supergoofy Guest

    On 16/04/2011 2:27 p.m., Lyndon Watson wrote:

    > For months now I've been getting emails purportedly from TelstraClear
    > claiming variously (1) my computer has been the source of massive
    > spamming overseas, (2) I have exceeded my downloading quota, (3) my
    > webmail account needs verifiying, and (4) the company is conducting a
    > periodical review of accounts - all requiring me to enter my password
    > and account details. Some of them were in ridiculously bad English
    > and I can dismiss most of them straightaway - my cable modem is
    > switched off except when I am actually using it, I have highly-rated
    > and paid-for security software, I never download music or videos or
    > play games online so my quota is never even approached, and I don't
    > even have a webmail account and I'm not sure what it is anyway.
    > Needless to say, none of the disasters which they threatened have ever
    > happened.



    This is Geo's scammer by the sound of it:
    http://www.consumeraffairs.govt.nz/scam-news/scam-alert-32


    Paradise's spam filter picked up an email this week claiming to be from
    Battle.net about account security.

    All the email addresses and links appeared to be legitimate (I didn't
    click on any to check), but I smelled a rat because (a) I have an
    account authenticator already and (b) while the standard of English was
    better than most spam, it wasn't quite right - little things like using
    the singular where they should have used a plural.

    If spammers ever learn correct English spelling and grammar we might be
    in real trouble!


    Rachel
    Supergoofy, Apr 16, 2011
    #15
  16. Geopelia

    Supergoofy Guest

    On 16/04/2011 2:46 p.m., wrote:
    > On Fri, 15 Apr 2011 19:27:10 -0700 (PDT), Lyndon Watson


    >> and I can dismiss most of them straightaway - my cable modem is
    >> switched off except when I am actually using it, I have highly-rated
    >> and paid-for security software, I never download music or videos or
    >> play games online so my quota is never even approached, and I don't
    >> even have a webmail account and I'm not sure what it is anyway.
    >> Needless to say, none of the disasters which they threatened have ever
    >> happened.

    >
    > How do you switch off your cable modem, Lyndon?



    Ours has a button on the top, we always turn it off when we're not using
    it as well.



    Rachel
    Supergoofy, Apr 16, 2011
    #16
  17. Geopelia

    Me Guest

    On 16/04/2011 1:12 p.m., Cilente Laguroto wrote:
    > In article<25aeb9f7-a84b-44bb-8666-28ae19f7bb72
    > @o21g2000prh.googlegroups.com>, says...
    >>
    >> On Apr 16, 7:28 am, whoisthis<> wrote:
    >>> In article<io9f1p$>,
    >>>
    >>> "Geopelia"<> wrote:
    >>>> I received an odd phone call today, from somebody whose English and accent
    >>>> were so bad that I couldn't understand her.
    >>>> I think she was telling me about some program to check one's own computer,
    >>>> but although I got her to repeat it she seemed to be gabbling something off
    >>>> a script, and it didn't seem to make any sense.
    >>>
    >>>> Has anyone else had a call like that recently? I think it's just the usual
    >>>> telemarketing scam, but wonder if it's going the rounds.
    >>>
    >>> Yes its a scam. They are telling you they have been asked by microsoft
    >>> or who ever to contact you because their monitoring has spotted you have
    >>> a virus. They will tell you to look in the task manager and lo and
    >>> behold here is a task running (And its is MEANT to be running and is a
    >>> legitimate task), they will then use that to confirm you have virus and
    >>> you must log onto their web site (which is full of malware), and for
    >>> only $300 you can download this miraculous program (which is actually a
    >>> trojan) onto you machine to fix the issue.
    >>> They now have control over your machine AND have you credit card details.

    >>
    >> There's another scam going around where "couriers" turn up with a box
    >> for you, and say that they need payment for delivery. The leave with
    >> your credit card details& you get an empty box.

    >
    > "Hi, I'm a "courier" and I require COD for an empty box that you didn't
    > order. Credit card, please."
    >
    > There must be more (or less) to it than that, because as it stands, your
    > scenario doesn't seem even remotely plausible.
    >
    > Where has this been happening?
    >

    It was reported to be happening at least in Northland. But I don't
    think it was specifically credit cards. IIRC they were using a fake
    wireless eftpos skimming device, and giving a reason that they weren't
    set up to handle cash.
    While some people might reject the idea of paying COD for a parcel they
    didn't order, if the charge was only a couple of bucks (for delivery
    only - not the cost of the "item" supposedly ordered), then I suspect
    they'd get takers quite easily.
    I doubt the cartons were empty - it would be better to put something in,
    so that they'd have a good chance and as much time as possible to clean
    out accounts.
    Me, Apr 16, 2011
    #17
  18. Geopelia

    Boots Guest

    On Fri, 15 Apr 2011 16:25:07 -0700, colp wrote:

    >> If they sounded credible and intelligent and they were taken to court
    >> then they would be convicted. Because they are so utterly implausible
    >> and so obviously a scam the courts are more likely to not have any
    >> legal basis for convicting them.

    >
    > Wrong. Incompetent criminals can be convicted just as easily as
    > competent ones.


    There are cases where the fraudsters were not convicted because the
    deception was so unbelievable the judge ruled in favor of the defendant
    (in compliance with the law)


    --
    "Filtering the Internet is like trying to boil the ocean"
    Boots, Apr 16, 2011
    #18
  19. Geopelia

    Donchano Guest

    On Sat, 16 Apr 2011 16:35:33 +1200, "Geopelia" <>
    shouted from the highest rooftop:

    >
    >"Donchano" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >>
    >> On Sat, 16 Apr 2011 14:46:32 +1200, shouted from
    >> the highest rooftop:
    >>
    >>>On Fri, 15 Apr 2011 19:27:10 -0700 (PDT), Lyndon Watson
    >>><> wrote:

    >> <snip>
    >>>>
    >>>>For months now I've been getting emails purportedly from TelstraClear
    >>>>claiming variously (1) my computer has been the source of massive
    >>>>spamming overseas, (2) I have exceeded my downloading quota, (3) my
    >>>>webmail account needs verifiying, and (4) the company is conducting a
    >>>>periodical review of accounts - all requiring me to enter my password
    >>>>and account details. Some of them were in ridiculously bad English
    >>>>and I can dismiss most of them straightaway - my cable modem is
    >>>>switched off except when I am actually using it, I have highly-rated
    >>>>and paid-for security software, I never download music or videos or
    >>>>play games online so my quota is never even approached, and I don't
    >>>>even have a webmail account and I'm not sure what it is anyway.
    >>>>Needless to say, none of the disasters which they threatened have ever
    >>>>happened.
    >>>>
    >>>>LW
    >>>
    >>>How do you switch off your cable modem, Lyndon?

    >>
    >> Don't know about Lyndon, but I can switch mine off by:
    >>
    >> 1. Removing the power from my modem.
    >>
    >> 2. Removing the cable from my modem.
    >>
    >> 3. Switching off the power to my modem.
    >>
    >> 4. Switching off my Local Area Connection (LAN)
    >>
    >> 5. Switching off my computer.

    >
    >I can't use Standby now, so switch off the computer. But it takes a long
    >time to start up, and Trend Micro also takes a long time to get going. I
    >wonder how much power I would use if I left it on.


    Is there some reason why you can't apply one of the first four
    suggestions?

    If you're using a modem then why can't you either switch it off (if it
    has an on/off button) or remove the power cable, ADSL cable or
    Ethernet cable?

    If you're using a Windows OS then why can't you simply switch off your
    Local Area Connection?

    >If the computer is left on, can people download things on to it with
    >Broadband please?


    Depends entirely on what you have in place to stop remote access to
    your computer while both your computer and broadband connection are
    on.

    What OS are you using?

    Does the Trend Micro you're using incorporate a firewall?
    Donchano, Apr 16, 2011
    #19
  20. Geopelia

    Boots Guest

    On Sat, 16 Apr 2011 17:10:22 +1200, Bret wrote:

    > On Sat, 16 Apr 2011 05:05:41 +0000 (UTC), Boots wrote:
    >
    >> On Fri, 15 Apr 2011 16:25:07 -0700, colp wrote:
    >>
    >>>> If they sounded credible and intelligent and they were taken to court
    >>>> then they would be convicted. Because they are so utterly implausible
    >>>> and so obviously a scam the courts are more likely to not have any
    >>>> legal basis for convicting them.
    >>>
    >>> Wrong. Incompetent criminals can be convicted just as easily as
    >>> competent ones.

    >>
    >> There are cases where the fraudsters were not convicted because the
    >> deception was so unbelievable the judge ruled in favor of the defendant
    >> (in compliance with the law)

    >
    > Perhaps you could provide a "cite" for that?


    Yes - indeed.

    The Crimes Act.


    --
    "Filtering the Internet is like trying to boil the ocean"
    Boots, Apr 16, 2011
    #20
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