NZ Post Trialling Open Source On Desktops

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Sep 1, 2009.

  1. Looking at Ubuntu and Linux Mint, they reckon out of the box it'll handle
    "90%" of their needs, part of the trial will be identifying the remaining
    part and what to do about it.

    <http://computerworld.co.nz/news.nsf/tech/83C4710E299C3A1BCC257623001997DC>
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Sep 1, 2009
    #1
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  2. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    EMB Guest

    Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    > Looking at Ubuntu and Linux Mint, they reckon out of the box it'll handle
    > "90%" of their needs, part of the trial will be identifying the remaining
    > part and what to do about it.
    >
    > <http://computerworld.co.nz/news.nsf/tech/83C4710E299C3A1BCC257623001997DC>


    NZ Post is one of the few companies that can afford to take that gamble
    and fail - they have the long-suffering taxpayer to pay for any problems
    or losses that may result.
     
    EMB, Sep 1, 2009
    #2
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  3. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Richard Guest

    EMB wrote:
    > Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >> Looking at Ubuntu and Linux Mint, they reckon out of the box it'll
    >> handle "90%" of their needs, part of the trial will be identifying the
    >> remaining part and what to do about it.
    >>
    >> <http://computerworld.co.nz/news.nsf/tech/83C4710E299C3A1BCC257623001997DC>
    >>

    >
    > NZ Post is one of the few companies that can afford to take that gamble
    > and fail - they have the long-suffering taxpayer to pay for any problems
    > or losses that may result.


    And they have a virtual monopoly on cash payments for so many businesses
    so if the queue extends out the door (as it did at my post shop
    often)people dont have anywhere else to go to.
     
    Richard, Sep 1, 2009
    #3
  4. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Carnations Guest

    On Tue, 01 Sep 2009 21:48:54 +1200, Richard wrote:

    > And they have a virtual monopoly on cash payments for so many businesses
    > so if the queue extends out the door (as it did at my post shop
    > often)people dont have anywhere else to go to.


    That would be because nobody else is prepared to set up a retail network throughout the country and
    be prepared to accept bill payments on behalf of other companies.

    It's not a legal monopoly. Neither is it a monopoly of its own creation. It's just that nobody else could be
    bothered.


    --
    "Filtering the Internet is like trying to boil the ocean"
     
    Carnations, Sep 1, 2009
    #4
  5. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Carnations Guest

    On Tue, 01 Sep 2009 21:06:11 +1200, Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:

    > Looking at Ubuntu and Linux Mint, they reckon out of the box it'll
    > handle "90%" of their needs, part of the trial will be identifying the
    > remaining part and what to do about it.
    >
    > <http://computerworld.co.nz/news.nsf/tech/83C4710E299C3A1BCC257623001997DC>


    As I understand it the use of Google Apps is still in a pilot phase and it is by no means certain that they
    will continue down that path. There is also a project to upgrade their MS Exchange clusters to the 2007
    version.

    As to the "10%" of things that they do, they've been moving to using web-based applications for a long
    time now. I would expect that only some of the more desktop $$$ analytical stuff would not easily port
    over to Open Office, because it is dependent on using TM1 and Exell macros.

    As to the use of MS Windows, NZ Post has only just finished rolling out MS Windows XP onto all its
    desktop computers. I would expect that they'll be wanting to get what they would consider to be value-
    for-money out of all that hideous expense and "investment" that has led to that result.

    I am pleased to hear that they're seriously considering Open Source options, altho' I believe that it is a
    matter of public record that it only happened after NZ Post's financial forecasting took a nose-dive. Cost
    reduction appears to be the primary driving motivation here.


    --
    "Filtering the Internet is like trying to boil the ocean"
     
    Carnations, Sep 1, 2009
    #5
  6. In message <4a9dc177$>, vitw wrote:

    > It's a bigger gamble to stay trapped in a monopolist's architecture.


    Particularly one where the bet is already showing signs of losing.
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Sep 2, 2009
    #6
  7. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Richard Guest

    Carnations wrote:
    > On Tue, 01 Sep 2009 21:48:54 +1200, Richard wrote:
    >
    >> And they have a virtual monopoly on cash payments for so many businesses
    >> so if the queue extends out the door (as it did at my post shop
    >> often)people dont have anywhere else to go to.

    >
    > That would be because nobody else is prepared to set up a retail network throughout the country and
    > be prepared to accept bill payments on behalf of other companies.
    >
    > It's not a legal monopoly. Neither is it a monopoly of its own creation. It's just that nobody else could be
    > bothered.


    Because nobody else was set up by the government, or has them to fall
    back on if things go wrong so its impossible to compete with them
    commercially on a fair footing.
     
    Richard, Sep 2, 2009
    #7
  8. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Richard Guest

    geoff wrote:
    > Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >> Looking at Ubuntu and Linux Mint, they reckon out of the box it'll
    >> handle "90%" of their needs, part of the trial will be identifying
    >> the remaining part and what to do about it.
    >>
    >> <http://computerworld.co.nz/news.nsf/tech/83C4710E299C3A1BCC257623001997DC>

    >
    > Neat. Such vital infrastructure running on hobbyware.
    >
    > geoff


    I have no problems with the use of linux - thats a great avenue to
    pursue - its the mention of the use of google that has me more worried...
     
    Richard, Sep 2, 2009
    #8
  9. In article <h7ktbl$ocu$-september.org>, victor <> wrote:
    >Simon wrote:
    >> On Sep 2, 2:22 pm, Richard <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I have no problems with the use of linux - thats a great avenue to
    >>> pursue - its the mention of the use of google that has me more worried...

    >>
    >> Yes, we've had a few people here claim that we should move away from
    >> mainstream locally installed applications, to the free Google-based
    >> services. Personally, I also have some significant concerns allowing
    >> an advertising company to provide my core application and data storage
    >> services.

    >
    >You can pay Google for the business version.


    ... but that's still not clever on a number of levels. A few that occur to
    me ...
    1) loss of control of data and associated data security ... particularly
    across international borders.
    2) related to 1 ... reliability. Assumes the company will always be
    available and willing to do the things you are trusting them to do.
    3) relies on the net which may or may not be going (so related to 1 and 2)

    I'm sure I'll think of others. :)

    Yes, I know that some/many organisations already contract out some or all of
    their data handling. Still doesn't sound clever to me. :)
     
    Bruce Sinclair, Sep 2, 2009
    #9
  10. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Simon Guest

    On Sep 2, 2:22 pm, Richard <> wrote:

    > I have no problems with the use of linux - thats a great avenue to
    > pursue - its the mention of the use of google that has me more worried...


    Yes, we've had a few people here claim that we should move away from
    mainstream locally installed applications, to the free Google-based
    services. Personally, I also have some significant concerns allowing
    an advertising company to provide my core application and data storage
    services.
     
    Simon, Sep 2, 2009
    #10
  11. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    victor Guest

    Simon wrote:
    > On Sep 2, 2:22 pm, Richard <> wrote:
    >
    >> I have no problems with the use of linux - thats a great avenue to
    >> pursue - its the mention of the use of google that has me more worried...

    >
    > Yes, we've had a few people here claim that we should move away from
    > mainstream locally installed applications, to the free Google-based
    > services. Personally, I also have some significant concerns allowing
    > an advertising company to provide my core application and data storage
    > services.


    You can pay Google for the business version.
     
    victor, Sep 2, 2009
    #11
  12. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Sailor Sam Guest

    victor wrote:
    > Simon wrote:
    >> On Sep 2, 2:22 pm, Richard <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I have no problems with the use of linux - thats a great avenue to
    >>> pursue - its the mention of the use of google that has me more
    >>> worried...

    >>
    >> Yes, we've had a few people here claim that we should move away from
    >> mainstream locally installed applications, to the free Google-based
    >> services. Personally, I also have some significant concerns allowing
    >> an advertising company to provide my core application and data storage
    >> services.

    >
    > You can pay Google for the business version.


    But who owns your data?
    Or, more to the point, who controls your data?
     
    Sailor Sam, Sep 2, 2009
    #12
  13. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Sailor Sam Guest

    Time (was Re: NZ Post Trialling Open Source On Desktops)

    For the love of all that is holy read the man page that teaches you how
    to set and/or adjust the time and/or timezone on your computer.
     
    Sailor Sam, Sep 2, 2009
    #13
  14. In message <4a9e0a92$>, vitw wrote:

    > In these days when memory and processing power keep getting cheaper and
    > more abundant, surely that's an argument for doing most or all the work
    > client-side.


    On the other hand, that's only true of memory and processing power for
    stationary computing devices. The mobile ones are still a few years behind
    in that regard.
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Sep 2, 2009
    #14
  15. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Carnations Guest

    On Wed, 02 Sep 2009 14:21:26 +1200, Richard wrote:

    > Because nobody else was set up by the government, or has them to fall
    > back on if things go wrong so its impossible to compete with them
    > commercially on a fair footing.


    Rubbish!

    For example, at one time Telecom had its own nationwide network of retail outlets which it
    subsequently closed. you do know how hideous Telecom's profits are don't you?

    It chose to close all those branches and to direct all its over-the-counter business to New Zealand Post
    - something that NZ Post had not done since before Telecom was split out of the New Zealand Post
    Office back in the '80s.


    --
    "Filtering the Internet is like trying to boil the ocean"
     
    Carnations, Sep 2, 2009
    #15
  16. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Carnations Guest

    On Wed, 02 Sep 2009 16:49:11 +1200, victor wrote:

    > There will be a hell of a lot of stationery shops going out of business
    > then.


    By an' large they're agencies for Kiwibank/NZ Post.


    --
    "Filtering the Internet is like trying to boil the ocean"
     
    Carnations, Sep 2, 2009
    #16
  17. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Carnations Guest

    On Wed, 02 Sep 2009 09:31:51 +1200, Allistar wrote:

    >> NZ Post is one of the few companies that can afford to take that gamble
    >> and fail - they have the long-suffering taxpayer to pay for any
    >> problems or losses that may result.

    >
    > Hopefully a result of this is lower cost for taxpayers, and also some of
    > that money being spend on local talent instead of foreign talent.


    What the above capitalistic moron fails to realise is that NZ Post pays an annual dividend to the Crown.
    NZ Post is profitable.

    The "Long-suffering taxpayer" (aka her Majesty the Queen) receives money from NZ Post each year.


    --
    "Filtering the Internet is like trying to boil the ocean"
     
    Carnations, Sep 2, 2009
    #17
  18. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Carnations Guest

    On Wed, 02 Sep 2009 10:37:08 +1200, geoff wrote:

    > Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >> Looking at Ubuntu and Linux Mint, they reckon out of the box it'll
    >> handle "90%" of their needs, part of the trial will be identifying the
    >> remaining part and what to do about it.
    >>
    >> <http://computerworld.co.nz/news.nsf/tech/83C4710E299C3A1BCC257623001997DC>

    >
    > Neat. Such vital infrastructure running on hobbyware.


    What is this vital infrastructure that is running MS Windows?


    --
    "Filtering the Internet is like trying to boil the ocean"
     
    Carnations, Sep 2, 2009
    #18
  19. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Carnations Guest

    On Wed, 02 Sep 2009 14:23:34 +1200, geoff wrote:

    > Unix maybe.


    Linux is a replacement for MS Windows.


    --
    "Filtering the Internet is like trying to boil the ocean"
     
    Carnations, Sep 2, 2009
    #19
  20. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Carnations Guest

    On Tue, 01 Sep 2009 21:29:02 -0700, Simon wrote:

    > Yes, we've had a few people here claim that we should move away from
    > mainstream locally installed applications, to the free Google-based
    > services. Personally, I also have some significant concerns allowing an
    > advertising company to provide my core application and data storage
    > services.


    What I don't understand is why an organisation -any organisation - would want to hand absolute control
    of its confidential data over to an enormous multinational third party corporation headquartered in a
    foreign country.

    Immediately you've lost physical control over its storage, lost control over how the storage is
    maintained, and lost control over how that data can be accessed.

    My own personal opinion is that to do that is utterly foolish. There are some things that are too
    important to farm out to a large foreign corporation.


    --
    "Filtering the Internet is like trying to boil the ocean"
     
    Carnations, Sep 2, 2009
    #20
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