NYPD tells you the Right Way to take pictures. Got it?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Unclaimed Mysteries, Apr 12, 2006.

  1. Unclaimed Mysteries, Apr 12, 2006
    #1
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  2. Unclaimed Mysteries

    fishfry Guest

    In article <hee%f.6088$>,
    Unclaimed Mysteries
    <> wrote:

    > While it may be 5 o'clock somewhere, Giuliani Time can be anywhere, so
    > enjoy this charming little story.
    >
    > http://www.villagevoice.com/news/0615,ferguson,72804,5.html


    You remember about a year ago NYC outlawed the taking of photos on the
    subway ... one of the most fertile environments for candid shots of New
    Yorkers people going about their business. Speaking as a guy who grew up
    in New Jersey and loved to take the bus into NY and ride the subways ...
    I take this personally.

    I truly hate the fear and paranoia that has descended on our country.
    Yes there was a horrible terrorist attack. But when you surrender your
    entire way of life to fear of imaginary terrorists -- then the
    terrorists truly have won.
    fishfry, Apr 13, 2006
    #2
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  3. Unclaimed Mysteries

    RobG Guest

    fishfry <> wrote in news:
    <snip>

    > I truly hate the fear and paranoia that has descended on our country.
    > Yes there was a horrible terrorist attack. But when you surrender your
    > entire way of life to fear of imaginary terrorists -- then the
    > terrorists truly have won.


    Yay! Finally, an American with balls, who isn't afraid of the bogeyman.
    What the Western world doesn't realise is that every time someone has to
    stand in line for two hours before they board their aircraft, or subject
    themselves to personal examination, or apply for a card to get them in the
    door at work, or gets shut out from their favourite fishing spot because of
    'terrorists'... well, the bad guys have won. If another bomb never explodes
    or another threat is never spoken, the bad guys have still won, just
    through the virtue of making us all jump through their hoops.

    The land of the free? You poor sods. Trouble is, we're all in the same
    shitty situation.

    RobG
    RobG, Apr 13, 2006
    #3
  4. Unclaimed Mysteries

    Photodan Guest

    Hmmm. You've "surrendered your entire way of life" because you can't
    take photographs on the subway? Who's being paranoid? Thirty years ago
    I was taking some night shots at the U.S. Capitol. I was approached by
    two Capitol police officers and told that photography was illegal on
    Capitol grounds. They couldn't tell me why (and didn't have to) but,
    what the hell, there must have been a reason and I could live with
    that. Besides, I'd already taken some good shots before they got to me.


    By the way, I live out here in middle America and I can assure you that
    no fear or paranoia has descended on our area of the country.

    And RobG. Plenty of Americans who "aren't afraid of the bogeyman" and
    the bad guys haven't won anything. Now I suggest you guys stop being
    paranoid and get out and take some photographs.
    Photodan, Apr 13, 2006
    #4
  5. Photodan wrote:

    > Hmmm. You've "surrendered your entire way of life" because you can't
    > take photographs on the subway? Who's being paranoid? Thirty years ago
    > I was taking some night shots at the U.S. Capitol. I was approached by
    > two Capitol police officers and told that photography was illegal on
    > Capitol grounds. They couldn't tell me why (and didn't have to) but,
    > what the hell, there must have been a reason and I could live with
    > that. Besides, I'd already taken some good shots before they got to me.
    >
    >
    > By the way, I live out here in middle America and I can assure you that
    > no fear or paranoia has descended on our area of the country.
    >
    > And RobG. Plenty of Americans who "aren't afraid of the bogeyman" and
    > the bad guys haven't won anything. Now I suggest you guys stop being
    > paranoid and get out and take some photographs.
    >


    Well done. 500 Patriot Points for YOU. Photodan is absolutely correct,
    but he isn't going far enough. With threats everywhere these days, I
    think it is important to prevent improper photography that might
    compromise our security - either directly or indirectly.

    Directly, improper photography reveals details of our nation's vital
    resources and infrastructure. For example this image:

    http://www.unclaimedmysteries.net/images/skate_ir00.jpg

    presents several security issues. It seems harmless, a little
    amateurish. But look again. It shows an interstate highway ramp in the
    background. Terrorists would love to study the weaknesses of these choke
    points and cause chaos in the Homeland. Furthermore, it is an infrared
    image. That alone should raise red flags and sound alarms for any
    security-aware citizen. Who needs this capability? Are not our CCDs with
    red, white, and blue sensors good enough?

    Perhaps it's time to ensure that photographers are fully qualified to
    use the technology that America has given them. Some hopeless liberals
    have stated that by default, photography in public should be allowed
    with only a few exceptions. This is an open invitation for America's
    many enemies to surveil and plot in the name of "art" or "journalism."

    I call for all digital cameras to be fitted with devices that
    automatically sense their location, pointing direction and orientation,
    and automatically shut down in non-permitted sectors. This would prevent
    any temptation to take pictures that do not extol, but denigrate this
    nation whose freedoms we all cherish. This feature would also protect
    American corporations' vital intellectual property, as well as certain
    cloud formations which are copyrighted by AccuWeather, Inc.

    Indirectly, photographers can place law enforcement and other government
    personnel in an unflattering light by photographing so-called "abuses"
    and publicizing the resulting treasonous images. These provocations
    erode confidence in the System and must not be allowed.

    Therefore I also call for the immediate licensure of all Americans
    desiring to pursue the photographic arts. This includes testing on the
    prospective photographer's motives and political standards, as well as
    practical knowledge on what is permissible to photograph in the Homeland.

    The President of course has ultimate discretion in how these rules are
    to be enforced. In order to survive in a post-9/11 world, we must be
    willing to go back to a pre-1215 world.

    Now let's go out and take more flower pictures.

    Corry
    --
    It Came From C. L. Smith's Unclaimed Mysteries.
    http://www.unclaimedmysteries.net

    "Shop as usual. And avoid panic buying." -Negativland
    Unclaimed Mysteries, Apr 13, 2006
    #5
  6. In article <Xns97A4BF7145CEErgrinbergspamspam@203.87.95.150>, RobG
    <> wrote:

    > Yay! Finally, an American with balls, who isn't afraid of the bogeyman.
    > What the Western world doesn't realise is that every time someone has to
    > stand in line for two hours before they board their aircraft, or subject
    > themselves to personal examination, or apply for a card to get them in the
    > door at work, or gets shut out from their favourite fishing spot because of
    > 'terrorists'... well, the bad guys have won. If another bomb never explodes
    > or another threat is never spoken, the bad guys have still won, just
    > through the virtue of making us all jump through their hoops.


    You know what I'd like to see? Have someone total up the money spent,
    the man-hours wasted, the lost productivity of our "anti-terrorist"
    precautions. Then compare the total to actual losses from terrorism.

    Not in any way to diminish the loss and suffering of the original
    victims, but I think we'd find 99% of the damage we did to ourselves.

    I also don't buy that we've been 100% effective in preventing attacks
    for the last five years. The governent just isn't that competent. What
    a funny joke on us, to pull off a sucessful attack, the let us go on
    and on, turning ourselves into the kind of restrictive society our
    enemies would like to see us become.
    Scott Schuckert, Apr 13, 2006
    #6
  7. Unclaimed Mysteries

    tjab Guest

    In article <>,
    Photodan <> wrote:
    >Hmmm. You've "surrendered your entire way of life" because you can't
    >take photographs on the subway? Who's being paranoid? Thirty years ago
    >I was taking some night shots at the U.S. Capitol. I was approached by
    >two Capitol police officers and told that photography was illegal on
    >Capitol grounds. They couldn't tell me why (and didn't have to) but,
    >what the hell, there must have been a reason and I could live with
    >that.


    They lied, and you rolled over and wagged your tail.
    tjab, Apr 13, 2006
    #7
  8. Unclaimed Mysteries

    J. Clarke Guest

    tjab wrote:

    > In article <>,
    > Photodan <> wrote:
    >>Hmmm. You've "surrendered your entire way of life" because you can't
    >>take photographs on the subway? Who's being paranoid? Thirty years ago
    >>I was taking some night shots at the U.S. Capitol. I was approached by
    >>two Capitol police officers and told that photography was illegal on
    >>Capitol grounds. They couldn't tell me why (and didn't have to) but,
    >>what the hell, there must have been a reason and I could live with
    >>that.

    >
    > They lied, and you rolled over and wagged your tail.


    Lemme guess, you're single and don't have a mortgage.



    --
    --John
    to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
    J. Clarke, Apr 13, 2006
    #8
  9. Unclaimed Mysteries

    Photodan Guest

    "They lied, and you rolled over and wagged your tail."

    Stop being a little sissy and go photograph whatever you want. Weary of
    you little New York whiners. And Unclaimed, your sarcasm is amusing and
    I enjoyed your website. My God! We're all reduced to taking innocuous
    pictures of flowers.
    Photodan, Apr 13, 2006
    #9
  10. Unclaimed Mysteries

    Guest

    On Thu, 13 Apr 2006 13:07:22 GMT, Unclaimed Mysteries
    <> wrote:

    >Photodan wrote:
    >
    >> Hmmm. You've "surrendered your entire way of life" because you can't
    >> take photographs on the subway? Who's being paranoid? Thirty years ago
    >> I was taking some night shots at the U.S. Capitol. I was approached by
    >> two Capitol police officers and told that photography was illegal on
    >> Capitol grounds. They couldn't tell me why (and didn't have to) but,
    >> what the hell, there must have been a reason and I could live with
    >> that. Besides, I'd already taken some good shots before they got to me.
    >>
    >>
    >> By the way, I live out here in middle America and I can assure you that
    >> no fear or paranoia has descended on our area of the country.
    >>
    >> And RobG. Plenty of Americans who "aren't afraid of the bogeyman" and
    >> the bad guys haven't won anything. Now I suggest you guys stop being
    >> paranoid and get out and take some photographs.
    >>

    >
    >Well done. 500 Patriot Points for YOU. Photodan is absolutely correct,
    >but he isn't going far enough. With threats everywhere these days, I
    >think it is important to prevent improper photography that might
    >compromise our security - either directly or indirectly.
    >
    >Directly, improper photography reveals details of our nation's vital
    >resources and infrastructure. For example this image:
    >
    >http://www.unclaimedmysteries.net/images/skate_ir00.jpg
    >
    >presents several security issues. It seems harmless, a little
    >amateurish. But look again. It shows an interstate highway ramp in the
    >background. Terrorists would love to study the weaknesses of these choke
    >points and cause chaos in the Homeland. Furthermore, it is an infrared
    >image. That alone should raise red flags and sound alarms for any
    >security-aware citizen. Who needs this capability? Are not our CCDs with
    >red, white, and blue sensors good enough?
    >
    >Perhaps it's time to ensure that photographers are fully qualified to
    >use the technology that America has given them. Some hopeless liberals
    >have stated that by default, photography in public should be allowed
    >with only a few exceptions. This is an open invitation for America's
    >many enemies to surveil and plot in the name of "art" or "journalism."
    >
    >I call for all digital cameras to be fitted with devices that
    >automatically sense their location, pointing direction and orientation,
    >and automatically shut down in non-permitted sectors. This would prevent
    >any temptation to take pictures that do not extol, but denigrate this
    >nation whose freedoms we all cherish. This feature would also protect
    >American corporations' vital intellectual property, as well as certain
    >cloud formations which are copyrighted by AccuWeather, Inc.
    >
    >Indirectly, photographers can place law enforcement and other government
    >personnel in an unflattering light by photographing so-called "abuses"
    >and publicizing the resulting treasonous images. These provocations
    >erode confidence in the System and must not be allowed.
    >
    >Therefore I also call for the immediate licensure of all Americans
    >desiring to pursue the photographic arts. This includes testing on the
    >prospective photographer's motives and political standards, as well as
    >practical knowledge on what is permissible to photograph in the Homeland.
    >
    >The President of course has ultimate discretion in how these rules are
    >to be enforced. In order to survive in a post-9/11 world, we must be
    >willing to go back to a pre-1215 world.
    >
    >Now let's go out and take more flower pictures.
    >
    >Corry





    Ummm......

    I think you bin reading too much George Orwell.
    What a load of rubbish....tsk tsk....

    Posted Via Usenet.com Premium Usenet Newsgroup Services
    ----------------------------------------------------------
    ** SPEED ** RETENTION ** COMPLETION ** ANONYMITY **
    ----------------------------------------------------------
    http://www.usenet.com
    , Apr 13, 2006
    #10
  11. Unclaimed Mysteries

    Bert Hyman Guest

    lid (J. Clarke) wrote in
    news::

    > tjab wrote:
    >
    >> In article
    >> <>, Photodan
    >> <> wrote:
    >>>Hmmm. You've "surrendered your entire way of life" because you
    >>>can't take photographs on the subway? Who's being paranoid? Thirty
    >>>years ago I was taking some night shots at the U.S. Capitol. I was
    >>>approached by two Capitol police officers and told that
    >>>photography was illegal on Capitol grounds. They couldn't tell me
    >>>why (and didn't have to) but, what the hell, there must have been
    >>>a reason and I could live with that.

    >>
    >> They lied, and you rolled over and wagged your tail.

    >
    > Lemme guess, you're single and don't have a mortgage.


    "Freedom's just another word for nothing left to lose"

    Kriss Kristofferson.

    --
    Bert Hyman | St. Paul, MN |
    Bert Hyman, Apr 13, 2006
    #11
  12. Unclaimed Mysteries

    Bill Funk Guest

    On 13 Apr 2006 16:18:51 GMT, Bert Hyman <> wrote:

    >"Freedom's just another word for nothing left to lose"
    >
    > Kriss Kristofferson.


    "The main function of a bumper sticker is to hide rust."

    Me
    --
    Bill Funk
    replace "g" with "a"
    Bill Funk, Apr 13, 2006
    #12
  13. Bert Hyman wrote:
    >
    > "Freedom's just another word for nothing left to lose"
    >
    > Kriss Kristofferson.


    Er, ah, um: Janis Joplin
    John McWilliams, Apr 13, 2006
    #13
  14. Unclaimed Mysteries

    Bert Hyman Guest

    (John McWilliams) wrote in
    news::

    > Bert Hyman wrote:
    >>
    >> "Freedom's just another word for nothing left to lose"
    >>
    >> Kriss Kristofferson.

    >
    > Er, ah, um: Janis Joplin


    She sang the words on one popular recording of the song.

    He wrote the words.

    --
    Bert Hyman | St. Paul, MN |
    Bert Hyman, Apr 13, 2006
    #14
  15. wrote in part:

    >
    > I think you bin reading too much George Orwell.
    > What a load of rubbish....tsk tsk....
    >


    Who?

    --
    It Came From C. L. Smith's Unclaimed Mysteries.
    http://www.unclaimedmysteries.net

    "That dude that took the picture, Corry Smith, is a bigtime aubie.
    Notice he named the pic 'BRIANDENNEHYstadium' Screw him!" - T. Boozer in
    rolltidefan.net
    Unclaimed Mysteries, Apr 13, 2006
    #15
  16. Unclaimed Mysteries

    salgud Guest

    Unclaimed Mysteries wrote:
    > Photodan wrote:
    >
    > > Hmmm. You've "surrendered your entire way of life" because you can't
    > > take photographs on the subway? Who's being paranoid? Thirty years ago
    > > I was taking some night shots at the U.S. Capitol. I was approached by
    > > two Capitol police officers and told that photography was illegal on
    > > Capitol grounds. They couldn't tell me why (and didn't have to) but,
    > > what the hell, there must have been a reason and I could live with
    > > that. Besides, I'd already taken some good shots before they got to me.
    > >
    > >
    > > By the way, I live out here in middle America and I can assure you that
    > > no fear or paranoia has descended on our area of the country.
    > >
    > > And RobG. Plenty of Americans who "aren't afraid of the bogeyman" and
    > > the bad guys haven't won anything. Now I suggest you guys stop being
    > > paranoid and get out and take some photographs.
    > >

    >
    > Well done. 500 Patriot Points for YOU. Photodan is absolutely correct,
    > but he isn't going far enough. With threats everywhere these days, I
    > think it is important to prevent improper photography that might
    > compromise our security - either directly or indirectly.
    >
    > Directly, improper photography reveals details of our nation's vital
    > resources and infrastructure. For example this image:
    >
    > http://www.unclaimedmysteries.net/images/skate_ir00.jpg
    >
    > presents several security issues. It seems harmless, a little
    > amateurish. But look again. It shows an interstate highway ramp in the
    > background. Terrorists would love to study the weaknesses of these choke
    > points and cause chaos in the Homeland. Furthermore, it is an infrared
    > image. That alone should raise red flags and sound alarms for any
    > security-aware citizen. Who needs this capability? Are not our CCDs with
    > red, white, and blue sensors good enough?
    >
    > Perhaps it's time to ensure that photographers are fully qualified to
    > use the technology that America has given them. Some hopeless liberals
    > have stated that by default, photography in public should be allowed
    > with only a few exceptions. This is an open invitation for America's
    > many enemies to surveil and plot in the name of "art" or "journalism."
    >
    > I call for all digital cameras to be fitted with devices that
    > automatically sense their location, pointing direction and orientation,
    > and automatically shut down in non-permitted sectors. This would prevent
    > any temptation to take pictures that do not extol, but denigrate this
    > nation whose freedoms we all cherish. This feature would also protect
    > American corporations' vital intellectual property, as well as certain
    > cloud formations which are copyrighted by AccuWeather, Inc.
    >
    > Indirectly, photographers can place law enforcement and other government
    > personnel in an unflattering light by photographing so-called "abuses"
    > and publicizing the resulting treasonous images. These provocations
    > erode confidence in the System and must not be allowed.
    >
    > Therefore I also call for the immediate licensure of all Americans
    > desiring to pursue the photographic arts. This includes testing on the
    > prospective photographer's motives and political standards, as well as
    > practical knowledge on what is permissible to photograph in the Homeland.
    >
    > The President of course has ultimate discretion in how these rules are
    > to be enforced. In order to survive in a post-9/11 world, we must be
    > willing to go back to a pre-1215 world.
    >
    > Now let's go out and take more flower pictures.
    >
    > Corry
    > --
    > It Came From C. L. Smith's Unclaimed Mysteries.
    > http://www.unclaimedmysteries.net
    >
    > "Shop as usual. And avoid panic buying." -Negativland


    ROFLMAO!!
    Very good! Unfortunately, there are those among us who'd take this
    seriously, and support every ridiculous thing you've proposed! Scary.
    salgud, Apr 13, 2006
    #16
  17. Unclaimed Mysteries

    ASAAR Guest

    On 13 Apr 2006 16:18:51 GMT, Bert Hyman wrote:

    > "Freedom's just another word for nothing left to lose"
    >
    > Kriss Kristofferson.


    Kristofferson's just another word for loser.

    (sort of . . .)
    ASAAR, Apr 13, 2006
    #17
  18. ASAAR <> wrote in news:c4bt32hnv9k2lqv15ublqht2u2gmu9m9jo@
    4ax.com:

    > On 13 Apr 2006 16:18:51 GMT, Bert Hyman wrote:
    >
    >> "Freedom's just another word for nothing left to lose"
    >>
    >> Kriss Kristofferson.

    >
    > Kristofferson's just another word for loser.
    >
    > (sort of . . .)


    Yeah - but 'Kristofferson' does a better job of ticking off the spell
    czecher...
    Bob Harrington, Apr 13, 2006
    #18
  19. Unclaimed Mysteries

    ASAAR Guest

    On Thu, 13 Apr 2006 20:13:46 GMT, Bob Harrington wrote:

    > Yeah - but 'Kristofferson' does a better job of ticking off the spell
    > czecher...


    How'd you know I just finished reading "Cancelled Czech"?
    ASAAR, Apr 13, 2006
    #19
  20. Unclaimed Mysteries

    ASAAR Guest

    On Thu, 13 Apr 2006 13:07:22 GMT, Unclaimed Mysteries wrote:

    > The President of course has ultimate discretion in how these rules are
    > to be enforced. In order to survive in a post-9/11 world, we must be
    > willing to go back to a pre-1215 world.
    >
    > Now let's go out and take more flower pictures.


    Not until Homeland Security Approved cameras are offered for sale.
    They'll be designed to embed not only the camera's serial number,
    but that of the flash card as well into each image. Then I'll be
    able to sleep soundly, secure in the knowledge that everything I do
    can be traced. You're aware, I suppose, that many laser printers
    embed hidden information in their output? I certainly hope photo
    inkjets do that too. Wouldn't want them to every be used to print
    unpatriotic photos or discouraging words, or the skies would end up
    being cloudy all day.
    ASAAR, Apr 14, 2006
    #20
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