NVIDIA graphics driver poblem

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by wr@jr., Oct 12, 2009.

  1. wr@jr.

    wr@jr. Guest

    When my computer boots up it always complains about having recovered from some
    serious problem and wants to send a message about it. So lately I've been
    letting it and trying get over the problem. It takes me to this page:

    http://tinyurl.com/ylfqdm6

    where it says:
    _________________________________________________________
    Address a problem with NVIDIA Graphics Driver

    NVIDIA Graphics Driver has stopped working properly.

    A driver update, if available, might prevent this problem from recurring.

    There are several ways of locating and installing driver updates, but it is best
    to let Windows do this for you. Try the first step below, which describes the
    process. If it doesn't produce a driver update that solves the problem, then try
    the remaining steps in the order given.

    1. Check for optional third-party updates

    2. Try updating NVIDIA Graphics Driver manually

    3. Check the NVIDIA Corporation website for driver updates

    4. Check your computer manufacturer's website for driver updates
    ¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯
    so I tried everything but the last thing. I downloaded the latest version:

    71.89_win2kxp_english.exe

    which it appears I already had to begin with, and then searched for it on my
    hard drive. I found several other copies in a few different folders, so I copied
    versions of the new one into every folder that had a copy already. I don't
    remember it asking me if I wanted to replace the ones that were already there,
    so could I still be having trouble with an old screwed up copy that it keeps
    bumping into without knowing there's a hopefully better copy right in the same
    folder? Or what? I got this computer used, and it has some stuff on it I don't
    need or even want. Is there a way to find out what programs are using that
    driver and remove everything associated with it if I don't want it, or maybe
    remove and reload it if I do?
    wr@jr., Oct 12, 2009
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. wr@jr.

    Paul Guest

    wr@jr. wrote:
    > When my computer boots up it always complains about having recovered from some
    > serious problem and wants to send a message about it. So lately I've been
    > letting it and trying get over the problem. It takes me to this page:
    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/ylfqdm6
    >
    > where it says:
    > _________________________________________________________
    > Address a problem with NVIDIA Graphics Driver
    >
    > NVIDIA Graphics Driver has stopped working properly.
    >
    > A driver update, if available, might prevent this problem from recurring.
    >
    > There are several ways of locating and installing driver updates, but it is best
    > to let Windows do this for you. Try the first step below, which describes the
    > process. If it doesn't produce a driver update that solves the problem, then try
    > the remaining steps in the order given.
    >
    > 1. Check for optional third-party updates
    >
    > 2. Try updating NVIDIA Graphics Driver manually
    >
    > 3. Check the NVIDIA Corporation website for driver updates
    >
    > 4. Check your computer manufacturer's website for driver updates
    > ¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯
    > so I tried everything but the last thing. I downloaded the latest version:
    >
    > 71.89_win2kxp_english.exe
    >
    > which it appears I already had to begin with, and then searched for it on my
    > hard drive. I found several other copies in a few different folders, so I copied
    > versions of the new one into every folder that had a copy already. I don't
    > remember it asking me if I wanted to replace the ones that were already there,
    > so could I still be having trouble with an old screwed up copy that it keeps
    > bumping into without knowing there's a hopefully better copy right in the same
    > folder? Or what? I got this computer used, and it has some stuff on it I don't
    > need or even want. Is there a way to find out what programs are using that
    > driver and remove everything associated with it if I don't want it, or maybe
    > remove and reload it if I do?
    >


    Have you recorded any of the actual error messages ?

    The "71.89_win2kxp_english.exe" file is only referenced, at the instant
    you install it. After that, the smaller files stored in OS folders, are the
    ones that are used on every reboot.

    Fixing driver issues is not always easy. I had one case, where no
    matter how much research and fiddling with files I did, I could not
    get acceleration enabled on my video card. The eventual solution
    was to reinstall the OS, to clean up the mess. So while there
    can be plenty of well meaning suggestions from people, it
    might turn out that no one knows what the problem is. So
    that is the "solution of last resort".

    But before doing that, at least a thorough listing of the
    symptoms, with plenty of details, will help people answering
    your question decide whether it is hardware or software. It
    helps if there is exact error text from the crash, error
    numbers in hexadecimal and so on.

    Once the "serious problem" message is gone, does the computer
    work properly after that ? Can you play games, and do the 3D
    games render properly and at full speed ? Sometimes a problem
    is serious enough, that the computer will immediately reboot.
    Is that what is happening ?

    What is the make and model number of the computer ? An example
    of a make would be "Dell" and a model number would be "Inspiron 1525".
    That gives the readers some idea of what vintage of computer it
    is. Since you're using a relatively old driver (71.89), that
    suggests the video card must be an older one, or that your
    OS is something older than WinXP. The last driver for Win98,
    was something like 81.98.

    http://www.nvidia.com/object/win9x_81.98.html

    This is the hardware supported by that driver version.

    http://www.nvidia.com/object/81.98_9x_supported.html

    Other OSes may have newer drivers, but they stopped supporting
    some of the cards on that list. For example, the most recent
    WinXP driver wouldn't support FX5200 but would support a
    Geforce 6200.

    But at this point, there isn't enough evidence to say whether
    a driver change will make any difference at all.

    Paul
    Paul, Oct 12, 2009
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. wr@jr.

    wr@jr. Guest

    On Mon, 12 Oct 2009 18:38:46 -0400, Paul <> wrote:

    >wr@jr. wrote:
    >> When my computer boots up it always complains about having recovered from some
    >> serious problem and wants to send a message about it. So lately I've been
    >> letting it and trying get over the problem. It takes me to this page:
    >>
    >> http://tinyurl.com/ylfqdm6
    >>
    >> where it says:
    >> _________________________________________________________
    >> Address a problem with NVIDIA Graphics Driver
    >>
    >> NVIDIA Graphics Driver has stopped working properly.
    >>
    >> A driver update, if available, might prevent this problem from recurring.
    >>
    >> There are several ways of locating and installing driver updates, but it is best
    >> to let Windows do this for you. Try the first step below, which describes the
    >> process. If it doesn't produce a driver update that solves the problem, then try
    >> the remaining steps in the order given.
    >>
    >> 1. Check for optional third-party updates
    >>
    >> 2. Try updating NVIDIA Graphics Driver manually
    >>
    >> 3. Check the NVIDIA Corporation website for driver updates
    >>
    >> 4. Check your computer manufacturer's website for driver updates
    >> ¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯
    >> so I tried everything but the last thing. I downloaded the latest version:
    >>
    >> 71.89_win2kxp_english.exe
    >>
    >> which it appears I already had to begin with, and then searched for it on my
    >> hard drive. I found several other copies in a few different folders, so I copied
    >> versions of the new one into every folder that had a copy already. I don't
    >> remember it asking me if I wanted to replace the ones that were already there,
    >> so could I still be having trouble with an old screwed up copy that it keeps
    >> bumping into without knowing there's a hopefully better copy right in the same
    >> folder? Or what? I got this computer used, and it has some stuff on it I don't
    >> need or even want. Is there a way to find out what programs are using that
    >> driver and remove everything associated with it if I don't want it, or maybe
    >> remove and reload it if I do?
    >>

    >
    >Have you recorded any of the actual error messages ?


    One time it said:
    _________________________________________________________
    BCCode : 100000ea BCP1 : 83158020 BCP2 : 83168F60 BCP3 : F8C68CB4
    BCP4 : 00000001 OSVer : 5_1_2600 SP : 2_0 Product : 768_1

    C:\DOCUME~1\MIKEWA~1\LOCALS~1\Temp\WERb07f.dir00\Mini092409-02.dmp
    C:\DOCUME~1\MIKEWA~1\LOCALS~1\Temp\WERb07f.dir00\sysdata.xml
    ¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯
    and another time it said:
    _________________________________________________________
    BCCode : 100000ea BCP1 : 831A6DA8 BCP2 : 8321A340 BCP3 : F8C64CB4
    BCP4 : 00000001 OSVer : 5_1_2600 SP : 3_0 Product : 768_1

    C:\DOCUME~1\MIKEWA~1\LOCALS~1\Temp\WERb4de.dir00\Mini100409-07.dmp
    C:\DOCUME~1\MIKEWA~1\LOCALS~1\Temp\WERb4de.dir00\sysdata.xml
    ¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯
    >The "71.89_win2kxp_english.exe" file is only referenced, at the instant
    >you install it. After that, the smaller files stored in OS folders, are the
    >ones that are used on every reboot.


    So does that mean this particular driver is necessary in order for the computer
    to run, so I can't just delete it and whatever program it's associated with?

    >Fixing driver issues is not always easy. I had one case, where no
    >matter how much research and fiddling with files I did, I could not
    >get acceleration enabled on my video card. The eventual solution
    >was to reinstall the OS, to clean up the mess. So while there
    >can be plenty of well meaning suggestions from people, it
    >might turn out that no one knows what the problem is. So
    >that is the "solution of last resort".
    >
    >But before doing that, at least a thorough listing of the
    >symptoms, with plenty of details, will help people answering
    >your question decide whether it is hardware or software. It
    >helps if there is exact error text from the crash, error
    >numbers in hexadecimal and so on.
    >
    >Once the "serious problem" message is gone, does the computer
    >work properly after that ?


    I haven't had any problem with it after it finally gets going, and I leave it
    on for days at a time.

    >Can you play games, and do the 3D
    >games render properly and at full speed ? Sometimes a problem
    >is serious enough, that the computer will immediately reboot.
    >Is that what is happening ?


    I don't play any games with it.

    >What is the make and model number of the computer ? An example
    >of a make would be "Dell" and a model number would be "Inspiron 1525".
    >That gives the readers some idea of what vintage of computer it
    >is. Since you're using a relatively old driver (71.89), that
    >suggests the video card must be an older one, or that your
    >OS is something older than WinXP. The last driver for Win98,
    >was something like 81.98.
    >
    >http://www.nvidia.com/object/win9x_81.98.html
    >
    >This is the hardware supported by that driver version.
    >
    >http://www.nvidia.com/object/81.98_9x_supported.html


    I searched my hard drive for anything named GeForce or Quadro, and all it came
    up with is:

    http://www.nvidia.com/content/Drive...cludes/us/images/driverpromo_quadro_adobe.jpg

    If that's the only thing that cares about that driver and I find it and trash
    it, might that end the problem? Come to think of it it has been several months
    since this problem began, and it may have started in March 2009.

    >Other OSes may have newer drivers, but they stopped supporting
    >some of the cards on that list. For example, the most recent
    >WinXP driver wouldn't support FX5200 but would support a
    >Geforce 6200.


    I don't want any stuff like that, so is there a way to find the program that's
    using it and get rid of everything associated with it including the driver?

    >But at this point, there isn't enough evidence to say whether
    >a driver change will make any difference at all.
    >
    > Paul
    wr@jr., Oct 13, 2009
    #3
  4. wr@jr.

    Paul Guest

    wr@jr. wrote:
    >
    > One time it said:
    > _________________________________________________________
    > BCCode : 100000ea BCP1 : 83158020 BCP2 : 83168F60 BCP3 : F8C68CB4
    > BCP4 : 00000001 OSVer : 5_1_2600 SP : 2_0 Product : 768_1
    >
    > C:\DOCUME~1\MIKEWA~1\LOCALS~1\Temp\WERb07f.dir00\Mini092409-02.dmp
    > C:\DOCUME~1\MIKEWA~1\LOCALS~1\Temp\WERb07f.dir00\sysdata.xml
    > ¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯
    > and another time it said:
    > _________________________________________________________
    > BCCode : 100000ea BCP1 : 831A6DA8 BCP2 : 8321A340 BCP3 : F8C64CB4
    > BCP4 : 00000001 OSVer : 5_1_2600 SP : 3_0 Product : 768_1
    >
    > C:\DOCUME~1\MIKEWA~1\LOCALS~1\Temp\WERb4de.dir00\Mini100409-07.dmp
    > C:\DOCUME~1\MIKEWA~1\LOCALS~1\Temp\WERb4de.dir00\sysdata.xml
    > ¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯


    0x000000EA: THREAD_STUCK_IN_DEVICE_DRIVER

    http://aumha.org/a/stop.htm

    >> The "71.89_win2kxp_english.exe" file is only referenced, at the instant
    >> you install it. After that, the smaller files stored in OS folders, are the
    >> ones that are used on every reboot.

    >
    > So does that mean this particular driver is necessary in order for the computer
    > to run, so I can't just delete it and whatever program it's associated with?
    >


    The way Windows works, is it is prepared to work with no video driver.
    Video cards have a default mode they (most all) support. It is something
    like a VESA mode. The Windows OS has a pre-installed driver, that knows
    how to talk to any video card using VESA mode. So, if you go to "Add/Remove"
    and remove the Nvidia driver, then Windows will use the other driver instead,
    on the next reboot. The resolution may drop to 640x480 when that happens, so
    you don't have a full, high res screen to look at. Operating in that mode is
    annoying. Then, you can install some other driver file you download
    from Nvidia.

    So, yes, you can delete the Nvidia driver. Use "Add or Remove Programs"
    to get rid of it. But it is best, if you have a new candidate driver
    downloaded all ready, because working in a 640x480 window in 16 colors
    is pretty annoying.

    >
    > I haven't had any problem with it after it finally gets going, and I leave it
    > on for days at a time.
    >


    That is a bit strange. Does that suggest to you, that perhaps some
    other piece of software may be contributing to the problem ? If the
    Nvidia driver is able to run for days at a time afterwards, without
    getting THREAD_STUCK_IN_DEVICE_DRIVER, then that suggests the
    driver by itself, may not be at fault.

    >
    > I don't play any games with it.
    >
    > I searched my hard drive for anything named GeForce or Quadro, and all it came
    > up with is:
    >
    > http://www.nvidia.com/content/Drive...cludes/us/images/driverpromo_quadro_adobe.jpg
    >
    > If that's the only thing that cares about that driver and I find it and trash
    > it, might that end the problem? Come to think of it it has been several months
    > since this problem began, and it may have started in March 2009.


    No, that isn't likely to be it.

    >
    > I don't want any stuff like that, so is there a way to find the program that's
    > using it and get rid of everything associated with it including the driver?


    I hesitate to suggest this, but I'll mention it anyway. If you go to the
    driver download page, "Option 2" is a scanner for your hardware. It will
    try to find the driver needed.

    http://www.nvidia.com/Download/index.aspx?lang=en-us

    *Always* save the driver you have currently, and keep track of which
    ones you've installed, so you'll know later what is going on. If
    the new driver doesn't work, you can uninstall that after you've tested
    it. WinXP, in the Device Manager, has a "rollback" button for the video
    card driver, but it only rolls back one driver version. You can manage
    your video driver, just as easily, by using "Add or Remove Programs".
    But so you won't be stuck in 640x480 forever, have the old driver
    handy, just in case.

    I recommend always uninstalling the old driver first, before installing
    the new one.

    What I cannot predict, is what the driver installers do with registry
    entries. On the one hand, they will remove stuff related to the
    card type perhaps, but if you had a problem, like the display
    resolution was set to a too-high value, the installer doesn't
    appear to change or delete that setting.

    If you get in trouble, you can also press F8 at startup, and enter
    Safe Mode. There are items like "Last Known Good Configuration". Take
    a moment to test F8 at startup, so you know how it works, and what
    menu options are available. One of the options should be
    "start windows normally", so you can exit F8 without invoking any
    of the Safe Mode features.

    http://pcanand.files.wordpress.com/2009/05/safe_mode_01_01.jpg

    Paul
    Paul, Oct 13, 2009
    #4
  5. wr@jr.

    wr@jr. Guest

    On Mon, 12 Oct 2009 21:00:34 -0400, Paul <> wrote:

    >wr@jr. wrote:
    >>
    >> One time it said:
    >> _________________________________________________________
    >> BCCode : 100000ea BCP1 : 83158020 BCP2 : 83168F60 BCP3 : F8C68CB4
    >> BCP4 : 00000001 OSVer : 5_1_2600 SP : 2_0 Product : 768_1
    >>
    >> C:\DOCUME~1\MIKEWA~1\LOCALS~1\Temp\WERb07f.dir00\Mini092409-02.dmp
    >> C:\DOCUME~1\MIKEWA~1\LOCALS~1\Temp\WERb07f.dir00\sysdata.xml
    >> ¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯
    >> and another time it said:
    >> _________________________________________________________
    >> BCCode : 100000ea BCP1 : 831A6DA8 BCP2 : 8321A340 BCP3 : F8C64CB4
    >> BCP4 : 00000001 OSVer : 5_1_2600 SP : 3_0 Product : 768_1
    >>
    >> C:\DOCUME~1\MIKEWA~1\LOCALS~1\Temp\WERb4de.dir00\Mini100409-07.dmp
    >> C:\DOCUME~1\MIKEWA~1\LOCALS~1\Temp\WERb4de.dir00\sysdata.xml
    >> ¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯

    >
    >0x000000EA: THREAD_STUCK_IN_DEVICE_DRIVER
    >
    >http://aumha.org/a/stop.htm


    Thanks for that link. Are the forums they mentioned helpful? I couldn't get
    anything out of the NVIDIA forum I tried.

    >>> The "71.89_win2kxp_english.exe" file is only referenced, at the instant
    >>> you install it. After that, the smaller files stored in OS folders, are the
    >>> ones that are used on every reboot.

    >>
    >> So does that mean this particular driver is necessary in order for the computer
    >> to run, so I can't just delete it and whatever program it's associated with?
    >>

    >
    >The way Windows works, is it is prepared to work with no video driver.
    >Video cards have a default mode they (most all) support. It is something
    >like a VESA mode. The Windows OS has a pre-installed driver, that knows
    >how to talk to any video card using VESA mode. So, if you go to "Add/Remove"
    >and remove the Nvidia driver, then Windows will use the other driver instead,
    >on the next reboot.


    I didn't try to delete it but I looked in "Add/Remove" to see if I saw it listed
    and I couldn't find it if it's there. Could it be under a different name or
    something?

    >The resolution may drop to 640x480 when that happens, so
    >you don't have a full, high res screen to look at. Operating in that mode is
    >annoying. Then, you can install some other driver file you download
    >from Nvidia.
    >
    >So, yes, you can delete the Nvidia driver. Use "Add or Remove Programs"
    >to get rid of it. But it is best, if you have a new candidate driver
    >downloaded all ready, because working in a 640x480 window in 16 colors
    >is pretty annoying.
    >
    >>
    >> I haven't had any problem with it after it finally gets going, and I leave it
    >> on for days at a time.
    >>

    >
    >That is a bit strange. Does that suggest to you, that perhaps some
    >other piece of software may be contributing to the problem ? If the
    >Nvidia driver is able to run for days at a time afterwards, without
    >getting THREAD_STUCK_IN_DEVICE_DRIVER, then that suggests the
    >driver by itself, may not be at fault.


    From my ignorant pov after reading their explanation this seems like it might be
    the best approach:
    _________________________________________________________
    .. . .
    This issue occurs if the graphics adapter is caught in an infinite loop while it
    waits for the video hardware to become idle. This can indicate that there is a
    problem with the video hardware, or that the graphics adapter cannot program the
    hardware correctly.
    .. . .
    Method 2: Adjust the Hardware Acceleration

    1. Click Start, click Control Panel, and then double-click Display.
    2. On the Settings tab, click Advanced, and then click the Troubleshoot tab.
    3. Move the Hardware Acceleration slider to None, and then click to clear the
    Enable write combining check box.
    4. Click OK, and then click OK.

    Note This procedure prevents the graphics adapter from programming the hardware
    incorrectly, but you may lose some display functionality and performance.
    Although you can increase the hardware acceleration settings higher than None to
    regain functionality and performance, these settings increase the possibility
    that the issue will occur again. For maximum stability, leave hardware
    acceleration off.

    http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=293078&sd=RMVP
    ¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯
    Do you think I should try it? Will I have to restart that computer?

    >> I don't play any games with it.
    >>
    >> I searched my hard drive for anything named GeForce or Quadro, and all it came
    >> up with is:
    >>
    >> http://www.nvidia.com/content/Drive...cludes/us/images/driverpromo_quadro_adobe.jpg
    >>
    >> If that's the only thing that cares about that driver and I find it and trash
    >> it, might that end the problem? Come to think of it it has been several months
    >> since this problem began, and it may have started in March 2009.

    >
    >No, that isn't likely to be it.
    >
    >>
    >> I don't want any stuff like that, so is there a way to find the program that's
    >> using it and get rid of everything associated with it including the driver?

    >
    >I hesitate to suggest this, but I'll mention it anyway. If you go to the
    >driver download page, "Option 2" is a scanner for your hardware. It will
    >try to find the driver needed.
    >
    >http://www.nvidia.com/Download/index.aspx?lang=en-us
    >
    >*Always* save the driver you have currently, and keep track of which
    >ones you've installed, so you'll know later what is going on.


    Should I make a list so I can do a search for them later? And how to know where
    to put them after I download them? Do they all go in the same folder? I believe
    there are three of four folders that contain that driver right now.

    >If
    >the new driver doesn't work, you can uninstall that after you've tested
    >it. WinXP, in the Device Manager, has a "rollback" button for the video
    >card driver, but it only rolls back one driver version. You can manage
    >your video driver, just as easily, by using "Add or Remove Programs".
    >But so you won't be stuck in 640x480 forever, have the old driver
    >handy, just in case.
    >
    >I recommend always uninstalling the old driver first, before installing
    >the new one.
    >
    >What I cannot predict, is what the driver installers do with registry
    >entries. On the one hand, they will remove stuff related to the
    >card type perhaps, but if you had a problem, like the display
    >resolution was set to a too-high value, the installer doesn't
    >appear to change or delete that setting.
    >
    >If you get in trouble, you can also press F8 at startup, and enter
    >Safe Mode. There are items like "Last Known Good Configuration". Take
    >a moment to test F8 at startup, so you know how it works, and what
    >menu options are available. One of the options should be
    >"start windows normally", so you can exit F8 without invoking any
    >of the Safe Mode features.
    >
    >http://pcanand.files.wordpress.com/2009/05/safe_mode_01_01.jpg
    >
    > Paul


    After it tries to boot up the first time and fails it brings up the option of
    starting in Safe Mode or normally. When I choose to start normally it usually
    brings up the Dell window or something, and then clicks and buzzes for a few
    seconds with a black screen, then it shuts down entirely and the power light on
    the monitor starts to blink. Then if I leave it alone for a bit the computer
    will try again, and will go to the window giving the start mode options. If I
    don't do anything it will try to start normally after so many seconds, fail, and
    do the same thing over and over and over... But if I start in Safe Mode, then
    shut down, then re-start that is when it will sometimes work okay. And sometimes
    after it has been sitting unused for a day or more it will start okay the first
    time on its own, and will give the error messages about having recovered from a
    serious problem.
    wr@jr., Oct 13, 2009
    #5
  6. wr@jr.

    wr@jr. Guest

    On Tue, 13 Oct 2009 14:27:36 -0500, "James D. Andrews"
    <> wrote:

    >
    ><wr@jr.> wrote in message news:...
    >> On Mon, 12 Oct 2009 21:00:34 -0400, Paul <> wrote:
    >>
    >>>wr@jr. wrote:
    >>>>

    >
    >FIRST YOU SAID:
    >¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯
    >> Should I make a list so I can do a search for them later? And how to know
    >> where
    >> to put them after I download them? Do they all go in the same folder? I
    >> believe
    >> there are three of four folders that contain that driver right now.
    >>

    >
    >AND ON THE ORIGINAL THREAD:
    >
    >NVIDIA Graphics Driver has stopped working properly.
    >
    >A driver update, if available, might prevent this problem from recurring.
    >
    >There are several ways of locating and installing driver updates, but it is
    >best
    >to let Windows do this for you. Try the first step below, which describes
    >the
    >process. If it doesn't produce a driver update that solves the problem, then
    >try
    >the remaining steps in the order given.
    >
    > 1. Check for optional third-party updates
    > 2. Try updating NVIDIA Graphics Driver manually
    > 3. Check the NVIDIA Corporation website for driver updates
    > 4. Check your computer manufacturer's website for driver updates
    >¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯
    >so I tried everything but the last thing. I downloaded the latest version:
    >
    >71.89_win2kxp_english.exe
    >
    >which it appears I already had to begin with, and then searched for it on my
    >hard drive. I found several other copies in a few different folders, so I
    >copied
    >versions of the new one into every folder that had a copy already. I don't
    >remember it asking me if I wanted to replace the ones that were already
    >there,
    >so could I still be having trouble with an old screwed up copy that it keeps
    >bumping into without knowing there's a hopefully better copy right in the
    >same
    >folder? Or what? I got this computer used, and it has some stuff on it I
    >don't
    >need or even want. Is there a way to find out what programs are using that
    >driver and remove everything associated with it if I don't want it, or maybe
    >remove and reload it if I do?
    >
    >AND SO I WONDER:
    >Twice you reference putting the driver files into certain folders. Did you
    >actually install these drivers?


    Maybe not...I don't know. Doing a search for
    71.89_win2kxp_english.exe on the hard drive brings up two results
    for a 19,382 KB Application. They are located in:

    C:\cdj840\2kxpinf\enu\drivers\win2k_xp
    C:\Documents and Settings\Mike Ward\Desktop\K

    and both were created October 5, 2009. Both are File Version
    2.11.15.0

    >Does the device show up in Device Manager?


    I couldn't find Device Manager. I did a hard drive search and it
    came up with 0 results.

    >If so, did you try to use the Update Driver function there?
    >
    >You might also use Add/Remove Hardware to reinstall the device


    I don't know which device it would be. How to find out?

    >and when
    >asked for the drivers, browse to wherever you have the drivers stored. May
    >help, may not.
    >
    >As Paul points out, always backup your drivers before updating or replacing
    >them.
    >There are software programs out there, both freeware and paid, for backing
    >up drivers.
    >
    >Personally, I keep a DRIVERS directory to hold copies of drivers (classified
    >by types) of my own systems as well as others I maintain or rebuild.
    >
    >Don't know if you use one or not, but it might be helpful to use an Action
    >Log to document your system and all its System Info, its errors with the
    >messages it displays (with date & time), each step you take in trying to
    >correct the problem, and the direct result of those steps.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    wr@jr., Oct 14, 2009
    #6
  7. wr@jr.

    Paul Guest

    wr@jr. wrote:

    >
    > I couldn't find Device Manager. I did a hard drive search and it
    > came up with 0 results.
    >


    There are different ways of accessing it, and this is just one.

    Go to Start:Run dialog, and enter this as the command.

    devmgmt.msc

    The Device Manager should pop up. That shows the hardware
    devices. There is info buried in each entry, with info
    like drivers and so on.

    For some more fun, use Start:Run again, and type this command

    dxdiag

    It will take up to 30 seconds for the window to fully load. Then,
    use the "Display" tab, to learn more about your hardware.

    Because there are so many numbers involved in driver versions,
    it is very hard to tell, after the fact, what file was installed
    to get the drivers that are currently there.

    You might be better off looking in the Control Panel for
    "Add or Remove Programs", to get some idea what driver
    package you installed.

    If you're still not sure, give this a try.

    http://www.techpowerup.com/downloads/1642/TechPowerUp_GPU-Z_v0.3.5.html

    GPU-Z.0.3.5.exe

    There is a driver version field on the GPU-Z window.

    HTH,
    Paul
    Paul, Oct 14, 2009
    #7
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