NTL broadband - No NIC

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by pleasenospam@hotmail.co.uk, Jan 17, 2007.

  1. Guest

    Hi

    I don't have any internet access at home at the moment and wanted to
    sign up to the NTL 2mb service. I downloaded the .exe file from the NTL
    site that checks your PC to see if it meet the required specs to
    receive broadband. My PC is about 4 years old but works fine.

    The program said the RAM, O/S etc.. were fine except my PC doesn't have
    a network card.

    "No functioning NIC found. Your PC has the minimum spec to receive
    broadband but has not met the recomended spec. You can receive and use
    broadband but the performance of your connection may benefit from
    upgrading your PC."

    Does anyone know if the broadband I would receive would be good enough
    without having this card? Is it worth upgrading the PC? Any problems
    with not having the NIC on my PC?

    thanks
     
    , Jan 17, 2007
    #1
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  2. Meat Plow Guest

    On Wed, 17 Jan 2007 14:32:37 -0800, pleasenospam Has Frothed:

    > Hi
    >
    > I don't have any internet access at home at the moment and wanted to
    > sign up to the NTL 2mb service. I downloaded the .exe file from the NTL
    > site that checks your PC to see if it meet the required specs to
    > receive broadband. My PC is about 4 years old but works fine.
    >
    > The program said the RAM, O/S etc.. were fine except my PC doesn't have
    > a network card.
    >
    > "No functioning NIC found. Your PC has the minimum spec to receive
    > broadband but has not met the recomended spec. You can receive and use
    > broadband but the performance of your connection may benefit from
    > upgrading your PC."
    >
    > Does anyone know if the broadband I would receive would be good enough
    > without having this card? Is it worth upgrading the PC? Any problems
    > with not having the NIC on my PC?
    >
    > thanks


    You need the Network Interface Card to connect your PC to
    NTL's broadband hardware.


    --
    Pierre Salinger Memorial Hook, Line & Sinker, June 2004

    COOSN-266-06-25794
     
    Meat Plow, Jan 17, 2007
    #2
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  3. Whiskers Guest

    On 2007-01-17, <> wrote:
    > Hi
    >
    > I don't have any internet access at home at the moment and wanted to
    > sign up to the NTL 2mb service. I downloaded the .exe file from the NTL
    > site that checks your PC to see if it meet the required specs to
    > receive broadband. My PC is about 4 years old but works fine.
    >
    > The program said the RAM, O/S etc.. were fine except my PC doesn't have
    > a network card.
    >
    > "No functioning NIC found. Your PC has the minimum spec to receive
    > broadband but has not met the recomended spec. You can receive and use
    > broadband but the performance of your connection may benefit from
    > upgrading your PC."
    >
    > Does anyone know if the broadband I would receive would be good enough
    > without having this card? Is it worth upgrading the PC? Any problems
    > with not having the NIC on my PC?
    >
    > thanks


    They probably mean that you could use a USB connection to their "modem",
    but that an "Ethernet" connection would be better. An Ethernet connection
    requires a "Network Interface Card" which can easily be added to most
    desktop or 'tower' home computers for a modest expense, particularly if
    you do it yourself. A laptop with a PC-Card slot (also known as PCMCIA)
    can have a PC-Card NIC added very easily. Your local independent computer
    shop, or Maplin branch, or even PC World, can probably sell you what you
    need.

    Using a NIC would probably make for a more reliable connection between
    your computer and NTL's "modem", and may make fewer demands on the
    computing power of your computer.

    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~
     
    Whiskers, Jan 17, 2007
    #3
  4. MJP Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi
    >
    > I don't have any internet access at home at the moment and wanted to
    > sign up to the NTL 2mb service.
    > The program said the RAM, O/S etc.. were fine except my PC doesn't have
    > a network card.
    >
    > "No functioning NIC found. Your PC has the minimum spec to receive
    > broadband but has not met the recomended spec. You can receive and use
    > broadband but the performance of your connection may benefit from
    > upgrading your PC."
    >
    > Does anyone know if the broadband I would receive would be good enough
    > without having this card? Is it worth upgrading the PC? Any problems
    > with not having the NIC on my PC?
    >
    > thanks


    Buy a NIC for your PC, they are very cheap on Ebay and if you have an
    available PCI slot it can be fitted in minutes. If you are anywhere near
    Walton on Thames you can have one for free.

    MJP
     
    MJP, Jan 17, 2007
    #4
  5. and3w Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi
    >
    > I don't have any internet access at home at the moment and wanted to
    > sign up to the NTL 2mb service. I downloaded the .exe file from the NTL
    > site that checks your PC to see if it meet the required specs to
    > receive broadband. My PC is about 4 years old but works fine.
    >
    > The program said the RAM, O/S etc.. were fine except my PC doesn't have
    > a network card.
    >
    > "No functioning NIC found. Your PC has the minimum spec to receive
    > broadband but has not met the recomended spec. You can receive and use
    > broadband but the performance of your connection may benefit from
    > upgrading your PC."
    >
    > Does anyone know if the broadband I would receive would be good enough
    > without having this card? Is it worth upgrading the PC? Any problems
    > with not having the NIC on my PC?
    >
    > thanks
    >


    You need the network card in order to use the broadband modem, as it creates
    a network to allow connection. So it is utterly vital. However, they WERE
    giving one away and coming to set it all up when I signed up for the 'Elite'
    [10Mb] service. This may have been because I needed the cable extended and
    they came and installed it all for nothing at the time.
    I dunno if the offer is still on, but I recommend blueyonder/NTL highly...at
    £35 a month, flat rate with no limits, no problems and a great helpdesk,
    when I have needed it, I'd pay the extra £ 10!!
     
    and3w, Jan 17, 2007
    #5
  6. Otter Guest

    In news:,
    <> typed:
    > Hi
    >
    > I don't have any internet access at home at the moment and wanted to
    > sign up to the NTL 2mb service. I downloaded the .exe file from the
    > NTL site that checks your PC to see if it meet the required specs to
    > receive broadband. My PC is about 4 years old but works fine.
    >
    > The program said the RAM, O/S etc.. were fine except my PC doesn't
    > have a network card.
    >
    > "No functioning NIC found. Your PC has the minimum spec to receive
    > broadband but has not met the recomended spec. You can receive and use
    > broadband but the performance of your connection may benefit from
    > upgrading your PC."
    >
    > Does anyone know if the broadband I would receive would be good enough
    > without having this card? Is it worth upgrading the PC? Any problems
    > with not having the NIC on my PC?


    You need a NIC. You should check your computer to see if it has one. It may
    have one, but is not functioning eg because the driver is not installed.

    If you don't have one, they are cheap, easily obtained and easy to install.
     
    Otter, Jan 17, 2007
    #6
  7. Guest

    Otter wrote:
    > In news:,
    > <> typed:
    > > Hi
    > >
    > > I don't have any internet access at home at the moment and wanted to
    > > sign up to the NTL 2mb service. I downloaded the .exe file from the
    > > NTL site that checks your PC to see if it meet the required specs to
    > > receive broadband. My PC is about 4 years old but works fine.
    > >
    > > The program said the RAM, O/S etc.. were fine except my PC doesn't
    > > have a network card.
    > >
    > > "No functioning NIC found. Your PC has the minimum spec to receive
    > > broadband but has not met the recomended spec. You can receive and use
    > > broadband but the performance of your connection may benefit from
    > > upgrading your PC."
    > >
    > > Does anyone know if the broadband I would receive would be good enough
    > > without having this card? Is it worth upgrading the PC? Any problems
    > > with not having the NIC on my PC?

    >
    > You need a NIC. You should check your computer to see if it has one. It may
    > have one, but is not functioning eg because the driver is not installed.
    >
    > If you don't have one, they are cheap, easily obtained and easy to install.




    Thanks for the replies everyone. I think I will have a go at installing
    a NIC. Never touched the inside of a PC before but I'm guessing it's
    not the hard to do. My next question is are all NIC cards the same or
    are some better than others? Is there a particulat NIC is should look
    to get and what sort of money are they to buy?

    thanks again.
     
    , Jan 18, 2007
    #7
  8. Otter Guest

    In news:,
    <> typed:
    >
    >
    > Thanks for the replies everyone. I think I will have a go at
    > installing a NIC. Never touched the inside of a PC before but I'm
    > guessing it's not the hard to do. My next question is are all NIC
    > cards the same or are some better than others? Is there a particulat
    > NIC is should look to get and what sort of money are they to buy?


    Shop around - eg
    http://www.novatech.co.uk/novatech/brands/a635x1y0z1p0s0n0m217 . They are
    relatively simple things and a standard, cheap one from your local computer
    shop should do.

    Take care in the installation of the card, and follow the printed
    instructions. Static electricity is a danger for the card and the bits
    inside your box. It's easy, but don't rush it. When it's installed, you may
    need a driver for it - they usually come on a cd with the NIC.
     
    Otter, Jan 18, 2007
    #8
  9. Guest

    Otter wrote:
    > In news:,
    > <> typed:
    > >

    > Shop around - eg
    > http://www.novatech.co.uk/novatech/brands/a635x1y0z1p0s0n0m217 . They are
    > relatively simple things and a standard, cheap one from your local computer
    > shop should do.
    >
    > Take care in the installation of the card, and follow the printed
    > instructions. Static electricity is a danger for the card and the bits
    > inside your box. It's easy, but don't rush it. When it's installed, you may
    > need a driver for it - they usually come on a cd with the NIC.


    PC World are selling a Dynamode 10/100 NIC card for £4.99. It has a
    RJ-45 connector, PCI adaptor and is 32 bit. The spec means nothing to
    me but will this do the job? I've looked at the back of my aged PC and
    there is a longish metal plate which I assume a card goes. How will I
    know if this card is compatible with the spare slot? I no longer have
    the manual for my PC :-(

    thanks.
     
    , Jan 18, 2007
    #9
  10. WhzzKdd Guest

    wrote:
    > Otter wrote:
    >> In news:,
    >> <> typed:
    >>>

    >> Shop around - eg
    >> http://www.novatech.co.uk/novatech/brands/a635x1y0z1p0s0n0m217 .
    >> They are relatively simple things and a standard, cheap one from
    >> your local computer shop should do.
    >>
    >> Take care in the installation of the card, and follow the printed
    >> instructions. Static electricity is a danger for the card and the
    >> bits inside your box. It's easy, but don't rush it. When it's
    >> installed, you may need a driver for it - they usually come on a cd
    >> with the NIC.

    >
    > PC World are selling a Dynamode 10/100 NIC card for £4.99. It has a
    > RJ-45 connector, PCI adaptor and is 32 bit. The spec means nothing to
    > me but will this do the job? I've looked at the back of my aged PC and
    > there is a longish metal plate which I assume a card goes. How will I
    > know if this card is compatible with the spare slot? I no longer have
    > the manual for my PC :-(
    >


    That should be fine (unless your PC is more than 10 years old) - but be sure
    you have the option to return the part if it isn't.
     
    WhzzKdd, Jan 18, 2007
    #10
  11. Otter Guest

    In news:,
    <> typed:
    > Otter wrote:
    >> In news:,
    >> <> typed:
    >>>

    >> Shop around - eg
    >> http://www.novatech.co.uk/novatech/brands/a635x1y0z1p0s0n0m217 .
    >> They are relatively simple things and a standard, cheap one from
    >> your local computer shop should do.
    >>
    >> Take care in the installation of the card, and follow the printed
    >> instructions. Static electricity is a danger for the card and the
    >> bits inside your box. It's easy, but don't rush it. When it's
    >> installed, you may need a driver for it - they usually come on a cd
    >> with the NIC.

    >
    > PC World are selling a Dynamode 10/100 NIC card for £4.99. It has a
    > RJ-45 connector, PCI adaptor and is 32 bit. The spec means nothing to
    > me but will this do the job?


    Very likely.

    > I've looked at the back of my aged PC and
    > there is a longish metal plate which I assume a card goes. How will I
    > know if this card is compatible with the spare slot? I no longer have
    > the manual for my PC :-(


    Ok. What follows is general stuff, but should more or less be the same with
    your PC.

    Turn off your PC, and disconnect all cables (writing down, if necessary,
    where they go). Do it slowly. Don't rush at it.

    Put the box on a flat space eg a table (duh!), and look for the screws or
    whatever that hold the side panels. Undo them, and only them, and put the
    panels out of the way.

    Turn your PC on its side, so you can look inside. Don't poke about!

    Usually there are screws holding in those narrow metal plates (one screw per
    plate). You can undo the screw, take out the plate, and the NIC should drop
    into that space, with the NIC contacts going into the adjacent PCI slot
    (follow the installation instructions for the NIC).

    If you can see how it would be done before buying the NIC, it should be
    fine, ie there is a PCI slot for the NIC to drop into when you remove the
    metal plate.

    In that case, that NIC will probably work.

    Replace the panels, and reconnect the cables.

    Turn on the PC - a new hardware screen should come up, and you should be
    asked for the driver disc. Insert the CD (or floppy), and proceed.

    If it goes ok, you will have your functioning NIC ready for connection to
    your modem and internet access after you sign up!
     
    Otter, Jan 18, 2007
    #11
  12. Guest

    Otter wrote:
    > In news:,
    > <> typed:
    > > Otter wrote:
    > >> In news:,
    > >> <> typed:
    > >>>
    > >> Shop around - eg
    > >> http://www.novatech.co.uk/novatech/brands/a635x1y0z1p0s0n0m217 .
    > >> They are relatively simple things and a standard, cheap one from
    > >> your local computer shop should do.
    > >>
    > >> Take care in the installation of the card, and follow the printed
    > >> instructions. Static electricity is a danger for the card and the
    > >> bits inside your box. It's easy, but don't rush it. When it's
    > >> installed, you may need a driver for it - they usually come on a cd
    > >> with the NIC.

    > >
    > > PC World are selling a Dynamode 10/100 NIC card for £4.99. It has a
    > > RJ-45 connector, PCI adaptor and is 32 bit. The spec means nothing to
    > > me but will this do the job?

    >
    > Very likely.
    >
    > > I've looked at the back of my aged PC and
    > > there is a longish metal plate which I assume a card goes. How will I
    > > know if this card is compatible with the spare slot? I no longer have
    > > the manual for my PC :-(

    >
    > Ok. What follows is general stuff, but should more or less be the same with
    > your PC.
    >
    > Turn off your PC, and disconnect all cables (writing down, if necessary,
    > where they go). Do it slowly. Don't rush at it.
    >
    > Put the box on a flat space eg a table (duh!), and look for the screws or
    > whatever that hold the side panels. Undo them, and only them, and put the
    > panels out of the way.
    >
    > Turn your PC on its side, so you can look inside. Don't poke about!
    >
    > Usually there are screws holding in those narrow metal plates (one screw per
    > plate). You can undo the screw, take out the plate, and the NIC should drop
    > into that space, with the NIC contacts going into the adjacent PCI slot
    > (follow the installation instructions for the NIC).
    >
    > If you can see how it would be done before buying the NIC, it should be
    > fine, ie there is a PCI slot for the NIC to drop into when you remove the
    > metal plate.
    >
    > In that case, that NIC will probably work.
    >
    > Replace the panels, and reconnect the cables.
    >
    > Turn on the PC - a new hardware screen should come up, and you should be
    > asked for the driver disc. Insert the CD (or floppy), and proceed.
    >
    > If it goes ok, you will have your functioning NIC ready for connection to
    > your modem and internet access after you sign up!


    Thanks that's a big help. Going back to the NIC card what's the
    difference between a 10/100 card and a 10/100/1000 card? I assume the
    10/100/1000 is better than the 10/100 so is it worth me getting one of
    these instead, or does it not really matter? Sorry to be a pain, as you
    can see I'm no computer expert.

    thanks again.
     
    , Jan 18, 2007
    #12
  13. Otter Guest

    In news:,
    <> typed:
    > Otter wrote:
    >> In news:,
    >> <> typed:
    >>> Otter wrote:
    >>>> In news:,
    >>>> <> typed:
    >>>>>
    >>>> Shop around - eg
    >>>> http://www.novatech.co.uk/novatech/brands/a635x1y0z1p0s0n0m217 .
    >>>> They are relatively simple things and a standard, cheap one from
    >>>> your local computer shop should do.
    >>>>
    >>>> Take care in the installation of the card, and follow the printed
    >>>> instructions. Static electricity is a danger for the card and the
    >>>> bits inside your box. It's easy, but don't rush it. When it's
    >>>> installed, you may need a driver for it - they usually come on a cd
    >>>> with the NIC.
    >>>
    >>> PC World are selling a Dynamode 10/100 NIC card for £4.99. It has a
    >>> RJ-45 connector, PCI adaptor and is 32 bit. The spec means nothing
    >>> to me but will this do the job?

    >>
    >> Very likely.
    >>
    >>> I've looked at the back of my aged PC and
    >>> there is a longish metal plate which I assume a card goes. How will
    >>> I know if this card is compatible with the spare slot? I no longer
    >>> have the manual for my PC :-(

    >>
    >> Ok. What follows is general stuff, but should more or less be the
    >> same with your PC.
    >>
    >> Turn off your PC, and disconnect all cables (writing down, if
    >> necessary, where they go). Do it slowly. Don't rush at it.
    >>
    >> Put the box on a flat space eg a table (duh!), and look for the
    >> screws or whatever that hold the side panels. Undo them, and only
    >> them, and put the panels out of the way.
    >>
    >> Turn your PC on its side, so you can look inside. Don't poke about!
    >>
    >> Usually there are screws holding in those narrow metal plates (one
    >> screw per plate). You can undo the screw, take out the plate, and
    >> the NIC should drop into that space, with the NIC contacts going
    >> into the adjacent PCI slot (follow the installation instructions for
    >> the NIC).
    >>
    >> If you can see how it would be done before buying the NIC, it should
    >> be fine, ie there is a PCI slot for the NIC to drop into when you
    >> remove the metal plate.
    >>
    >> In that case, that NIC will probably work.
    >>
    >> Replace the panels, and reconnect the cables.
    >>
    >> Turn on the PC - a new hardware screen should come up, and you
    >> should be asked for the driver disc. Insert the CD (or floppy), and
    >> proceed.
    >>
    >> If it goes ok, you will have your functioning NIC ready for
    >> connection to your modem and internet access after you sign up!

    >
    > Thanks that's a big help. Going back to the NIC card what's the
    > difference between a 10/100 card and a 10/100/1000 card? I assume the
    > 10/100/1000 is better than the 10/100 so is it worth me getting one of
    > these instead, or does it not really matter? Sorry to be a pain, as
    > you can see I'm no computer expert.


    The standard NIC is the one you want ie 10/100. The other card is for
    higher speed, and you will see from the prices that it is rather more
    expensive. It wouldn't be better for your purposes.
     
    Otter, Jan 18, 2007
    #13
  14. WhzzKdd Guest

    Otter wrote:
    > In news:,
    > <> typed:
    >> Otter wrote:
    >>> In news:,
    >>> <> typed:
    >>>> Otter wrote:
    >>>>> In news:,
    >>>>> <> typed:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>> Shop around - eg
    >>>>> http://www.novatech.co.uk/novatech/brands/a635x1y0z1p0s0n0m217 .
    >>>>> They are relatively simple things and a standard, cheap one from
    >>>>> your local computer shop should do.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Take care in the installation of the card, and follow the printed
    >>>>> instructions. Static electricity is a danger for the card and the
    >>>>> bits inside your box. It's easy, but don't rush it. When it's
    >>>>> installed, you may need a driver for it - they usually come on a
    >>>>> cd with the NIC.
    >>>>
    >>>> PC World are selling a Dynamode 10/100 NIC card for £4.99. It has a
    >>>> RJ-45 connector, PCI adaptor and is 32 bit. The spec means nothing
    >>>> to me but will this do the job?
    >>>
    >>> Very likely.
    >>>
    >>>> I've looked at the back of my aged PC and
    >>>> there is a longish metal plate which I assume a card goes. How will
    >>>> I know if this card is compatible with the spare slot? I no longer
    >>>> have the manual for my PC :-(
    >>>
    >>> Ok. What follows is general stuff, but should more or less be the
    >>> same with your PC.
    >>>
    >>> Turn off your PC, and disconnect all cables (writing down, if
    >>> necessary, where they go). Do it slowly. Don't rush at it.
    >>>
    >>> Put the box on a flat space eg a table (duh!), and look for the
    >>> screws or whatever that hold the side panels. Undo them, and only
    >>> them, and put the panels out of the way.
    >>>
    >>> Turn your PC on its side, so you can look inside. Don't poke about!
    >>>
    >>> Usually there are screws holding in those narrow metal plates (one
    >>> screw per plate). You can undo the screw, take out the plate, and
    >>> the NIC should drop into that space, with the NIC contacts going
    >>> into the adjacent PCI slot (follow the installation instructions for
    >>> the NIC).
    >>>
    >>> If you can see how it would be done before buying the NIC, it should
    >>> be fine, ie there is a PCI slot for the NIC to drop into when you
    >>> remove the metal plate.
    >>>
    >>> In that case, that NIC will probably work.
    >>>
    >>> Replace the panels, and reconnect the cables.
    >>>
    >>> Turn on the PC - a new hardware screen should come up, and you
    >>> should be asked for the driver disc. Insert the CD (or floppy), and
    >>> proceed.
    >>>
    >>> If it goes ok, you will have your functioning NIC ready for
    >>> connection to your modem and internet access after you sign up!

    >>
    >> Thanks that's a big help. Going back to the NIC card what's the
    >> difference between a 10/100 card and a 10/100/1000 card? I assume the
    >> 10/100/1000 is better than the 10/100 so is it worth me getting one
    >> of these instead, or does it not really matter? Sorry to be a pain,
    >> as you can see I'm no computer expert.

    >
    > The standard NIC is the one you want ie 10/100. The other card is for
    > higher speed, and you will see from the prices that it is rather more
    > expensive. It wouldn't be better for your purposes.


    Exactly - especially since broadband speeds don't even approach the high end
    of the 10/100 NIC speed. My cable modem only has a 10Mbps output. Maybe the
    newer ones are 10/100 though.
     
    WhzzKdd, Jan 18, 2007
    #14
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