NTFS for DOS

Discussion in 'A+ Certification' started by Edward A. Weissbard, Feb 4, 2006.

  1. I was recently in a position where I had to copy a file to an NTFS partition
    and I didn't have access to Recovery Console. I did find a very useful
    program called NTFSforDOS. It copies additional software to a Windows9x
    boot disk so that it can mount NTFS drives. I found it very useful when I
    thought I didn't have a choice without Recovery Console. The link follows
    to this freeware program:

    http://www.datapol.de/dpe/freeware/

    Thanks,

    --
    Edward A. Weissbard
    El Paso, TX

    "Life is easy with eyes closed"
    -----------------------------------------------
     
    Edward A. Weissbard, Feb 4, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. smackedass

    smackedass Guest


    >I was recently in a position where I had to copy a file to an NTFS
    >partition
    > and I didn't have access to Recovery Console. I did find a very useful
    > program called NTFSforDOS.


    This is good to know. I hope to God that I never have to use it...

    smackedass
     
    smackedass, Feb 5, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. Gerard Bok

    Gerard Bok Guest

    On Sat, 04 Feb 2006 23:21:37 GMT, "Edward A. Weissbard"
    <> wrote:

    >I was recently in a position where I had to copy a file to an NTFS partition
    >and I didn't have access to Recovery Console. I did find a very useful
    >program called NTFSforDOS. It copies additional software to a Windows9x
    >boot disk so that it can mount NTFS drives. I found it very useful when I
    >thought I didn't have a choice without Recovery Console. The link follows
    >to this freeware program:
    >
    >http://www.datapol.de/dpe/freeware/


    Sure. One other way is BartPE. http://www.nu2.nu/pebuilder/

    Which has as a major advantage, that the actual writing to NTFS
    partitions is done by Microsoft Windows.
    Which may not be a bad idee, given the poor compatibility record
    of 'third party writing to ntfs'-software.

    --
    Kind regards,
    Gerard Bok
     
    Gerard Bok, Feb 5, 2006
    #3
  4. Thanks for the other information Gerard.

    --
    Edward A. Weissbard
    El Paso, TX

    "Life is easy with eyes closed"
    -----------------------------------------------
    "Gerard Bok" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Sat, 04 Feb 2006 23:21:37 GMT, "Edward A. Weissbard"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > >I was recently in a position where I had to copy a file to an NTFS

    partition
    > >and I didn't have access to Recovery Console. I did find a very useful
    > >program called NTFSforDOS. It copies additional software to a Windows9x
    > >boot disk so that it can mount NTFS drives. I found it very useful when

    I
    > >thought I didn't have a choice without Recovery Console. The link

    follows
    > >to this freeware program:
    > >
    > >http://www.datapol.de/dpe/freeware/

    >
    > Sure. One other way is BartPE. http://www.nu2.nu/pebuilder/
    >
    > Which has as a major advantage, that the actual writing to NTFS
    > partitions is done by Microsoft Windows.
    > Which may not be a bad idee, given the poor compatibility record
    > of 'third party writing to ntfs'-software.
    >
    > --
    > Kind regards,
    > Gerard Bok
     
    Edward A. Weissbard, Feb 5, 2006
    #4
  5. pgluth1

    pgluth1 Guest

    I am certainly not an expert in this realm, but I have great luck using
    INSERT Linux - a "Live CD." (INside SEcurity Rescue Toolkit) From the
    website it claims it supports:

    EXT2,EXT3,MINIX,REISERFS,JFS,XFS,NTFS,FAT,MSDOS,NFS,SMBFS,CIFS,NCPFS,UDF,AF
    S,EFS,HFS,HFS+,HPFS,SHFS,UFS,UNIONFS

    So far, I have only had to use it for NTFS, FAT, EXT2 & 3. I can't vouch
    for the others.

    Best of all, it is only 50 megs, works on a Knoppix base, and also has the
    basics of a full operating system and anti-virus. I know mixing platforms
    is not encouraged for A+, but as a useful tool, I really enjoy it.
    Moreover, I have used the Knoppix DVD and CD and STD and found that INSERT
    has better and more reliable NTFS writing abilities. I recently rescued a
    Pentium Win98 system by carefully rewritting some files from the INSERT CD.
    I am not a Linux power-user and this uses a very stripped (though very
    fast) graphical interface. It is easy for any average Linux user, but might
    be a nightmare for a Windows user who just wants to fix something.

    As an aside, there is also a collection of open source programs called the
    "Ultimate Boot CD" and not only does it have a lot of nifty utilities, it
    also includes a slightly older version of INSERT.

    http://www.inside-security.de/insert_en.html
    http://www.ultimatebootcd.com/
     
    pgluth1, Feb 6, 2006
    #5
  6. Thanks pgluth1 for the info.........that one sounds really interesting.
    That sure is a lot of different types of partitions, most of them I never
    heard of.

    --
    Edward A. Weissbard
    El Paso, TX

    "Life is easy with eyes closed"
    -----------------------------------------------
    "pgluth1" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns9761EF01226F3pgluth1@208.49.80.60...
    > I am certainly not an expert in this realm, but I have great luck using
    > INSERT Linux - a "Live CD." (INside SEcurity Rescue Toolkit) From the
    > website it claims it supports:
    >
    >

    EXT2,EXT3,MINIX,REISERFS,JFS,XFS,NTFS,FAT,MSDOS,NFS,SMBFS,CIFS,NCPFS,UDF,AF
    > S,EFS,HFS,HFS+,HPFS,SHFS,UFS,UNIONFS
    >
    > So far, I have only had to use it for NTFS, FAT, EXT2 & 3. I can't vouch
    > for the others.
    >
    > Best of all, it is only 50 megs, works on a Knoppix base, and also has the
    > basics of a full operating system and anti-virus. I know mixing platforms
    > is not encouraged for A+, but as a useful tool, I really enjoy it.
    > Moreover, I have used the Knoppix DVD and CD and STD and found that INSERT
    > has better and more reliable NTFS writing abilities. I recently rescued a
    > Pentium Win98 system by carefully rewritting some files from the INSERT

    CD.
    > I am not a Linux power-user and this uses a very stripped (though very
    > fast) graphical interface. It is easy for any average Linux user, but

    might
    > be a nightmare for a Windows user who just wants to fix something.
    >
    > As an aside, there is also a collection of open source programs called the
    > "Ultimate Boot CD" and not only does it have a lot of nifty utilities, it
    > also includes a slightly older version of INSERT.
    >
    > http://www.inside-security.de/insert_en.html
    > http://www.ultimatebootcd.com/
    >
     
    Edward A. Weissbard, Feb 6, 2006
    #6
  7. Zaphod B.

    Zaphod B. Guest

    Edward A. Weissbard wrote :
    > I was recently in a position where I had to copy a file to an NTFS partition
    > and I didn't have access to Recovery Console. I did find a very useful
    > program called NTFSforDOS. It copies additional software to a Windows9x
    > boot disk so that it can mount NTFS drives. I found it very useful when I
    > thought I didn't have a choice without Recovery Console. The link follows
    > to this freeware program:
    >
    > http://www.datapol.de/dpe/freeware/
    >
    > Thanks,


    Another real goody is CIA Commander.
    * Accesses any NTFS partition
    * Gives you chance change any passwords
    * Gives you full access to NTFS from CIA Commander-DOS
    * With registry-editor included
    * Easy to use - all features offered through GUI

    http://www.freedownloadscenter.com/Utilities/Misc__Utilities/CIA_Commander.html


    --
    Zaphod B.

    ______________________________________________
    WISH LIST ITEM

    "For people who like peace and quiet: A phoneless cord."
     
    Zaphod B., Feb 7, 2006
    #7
  8. Guest

    Greetings,

    The other great tool is definately NTFS Reader. That allows you to
    access NTFS system in DOS oe Windows 98\me. The tool helped me before
    and I can say it is really reliable. The tool itself can be found on a
    data utils set CD image, Active@ Boot Disk that also inclides truly
    mighty tools for data erase, restore and backup.

    http://www.ntfs.com/boot-disk.htm
     
    , Feb 8, 2006
    #8
  9. Bob Bosen

    Bob Bosen Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Greetings,
    >
    > The other great tool is definately NTFS Reader. That allows you to
    > access NTFS system in DOS oe Windows 98\me. The tool helped me before
    > and I can say it is really reliable. The tool itself can be found on a
    > data utils set CD image, Active@ Boot Disk that also inclides truly
    > mighty tools for data erase, restore and backup.
    >
    > http://www.ntfs.com/boot-disk.htm
    >
    >


    Thanks for that info. I'm going to give it a try because I sometimes run
    into this situation.


    -Bob Bosen-
    http://www.AskMisterWizard.com (Instructional Videos)
     
    Bob Bosen, Feb 21, 2006
    #9
    1. Advertisements

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Tech
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    876
    Plato
    Apr 6, 2004
  2. Jackie

    reading ntfs files from dos

    Jackie, May 29, 2004, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    614
    °Mike°
    May 29, 2004
  3. Joe Donaldson
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    11,209
    Joe Donaldson
    Jun 28, 2004
  4. Boot to dos to access NT/2k NTFS?

    , May 11, 2007, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    6
    Views:
    816
    Plato
    May 12, 2007
  5. Giuen
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    2,403
    Giuen
    Sep 12, 2008
Loading...

Share This Page