Novice!

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by jerryz, Oct 18, 2004.

  1. jerryz

    jerryz Guest

    Can someone please explain (raw mode) for me. I'm a novice and have a new
    Nikon D70. And should i even be using that mode as a novice?
     
    jerryz, Oct 18, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. jerryz

    GT40 Guest

    On Mon, 18 Oct 2004 15:04:09 -0400, "jerryz" <>
    wrote:

    >Can someone please explain (raw mode) for me. I'm a novice and have a new
    >Nikon D70. And should i even be using that mode as a novice?
    >


    RAW mode means that there hasn't been any processing to the image.
     
    GT40, Oct 18, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. jerryz

    chidalgo Guest

    jerryz escribio:

    > Can someone please explain (raw mode) for me. I'm a novice and have a new
    > Nikon D70. And should i even be using that mode as a novice?


    RAW mode is a "mode" present in most moderns DSLR cameras, where all
    the data that compose the picture is saved in the memory card "as is".
    After that, you need to process that data in the software on your
    computer, to get finally a more common format, such a JPEG or TIFF image.

    RAW shooting allows to a better post-processing workflow, when JPEG
    files are ugly to modificate; fill-in flash, underexpose-overexpose and
    color balance are usually the tweaks that you can do to a RAW picture,
    without compromise (too much) the quality of the photo (ALWAYS is better
    to take the picture with the right parameters...)

    Backdraws? RAW photos take up more space that JPEGs files, but you
    cannot have fine-control tweaking in a JPEG file; in a RAW file you can.

    --
    chidalgo
     
    chidalgo, Oct 18, 2004
    #3
  4. Chidalgo basically got it right. My thoughts.

    RAW is as RAW sounds; it's raw. When a digital camera takes a picture, it
    takes the data and typically processes it to produce a final product, a
    JPEG. Parameters such as level of sharpening to apply, saturation, contrast,
    compression etc are factored in, making the JPEG that comes out something of
    a "final" product.

    With RAW, you get the picture data WITHOUT the processing, and you have to
    process it on your computer to produce a JPEG. Basically a RAW image cannot
    be used for normal image viewing; that is, you can't take a RAW and print it
    straight-up, or give it to a lab for printing, or do JPEG edits to it. You
    have to create a JPEG of it first.

    Typically, besides RAWs taking up much more space on the card, they also
    typically slow down the camera. The D70 is a very swift camera (especially
    for it to be an entry-level model vs a "high-speed" model like the D2H or
    Canon Mark II series models) so that isn't as much of an issue. With a
    camera like my 5700, it's a major issue. Note: the D70 also offers a
    "RAW+JPEG" mode which allows you to capture a JPEG with a RAW, but it's
    fixed as a "Basic" JPEG which isn't the best quality. So I would say the
    D70's (RAW+JPEG) mode is of no value unless you want a JPEG for a reference.

    To me there is no advantage to shooting RAW unless it's a "questionable"
    situation where you don't know if the photo is going to turn out as you want
    it to AND shooting RAW will improve your chances. IE, RAW won't fix an
    out-of-focus photo, or one that's blurry because you shot at too slow a
    shutter speed, or the background is blurry and you wanted it sharp. Also
    some situations are "straight up" and aren't condusive to having much of
    advantage with them being shot in RAW for those types of tweaks; typical
    JPEG tweaks are the answer for any jazzing up you want to do. With those you
    shoot JPEG.

    On the other hand, if you're shooting a tricky lighting situation where it's
    a choice between exposing for the shadows and blowing out the highlights or
    exposing for the highlights with everything else too dark, or if you think
    maybe the saturation or sharpness etc would look better tweaked from its
    normal settings and you want to see what works best and have the flexibility
    to change them later on the computer (a scenario I have happen with macros
    of flowers where I think I may want to increase saturation so the flowers
    look more "colorful" but I'm experimenting to see yes/no to that), and you
    have the room on your card to do it.

    I shoot RAW some, and I don't pretend to understand all the different
    parameters per se the way a professional would, but that's how I understand
    them to be.

    LRH


    "jerryz" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Can someone please explain (raw mode) for me. I'm a novice and have a new
    > Nikon D70. And should i even be using that mode as a novice?
    >
     
    Larry R Harrison Jr, Oct 18, 2004
    #4
  5. GT40 <> wrote in news::

    > RAW mode means that there hasn't been any processing to the image.


    Yepp - at least "almost" no processing.

    The picture is processed thus:

    1. Analog gain control to control ISO settings
    2. A/D-conversion
    3. Possible dark frame cancellation - to remove dark current noise.
    Almost all cameras can do this for long exposures.
    4. Possible grey frame multiplication - to remove uneven sensitivity.
    The Canon CMOS cameras do this. CMOS sensors without this
    processing are very noisy.

    After this you have the "RAW" image. For most cameras this means
    a Bayer pattern that is totally useless to display/print. You can
    then convert this to an ordinary RGB picture, that you can save
    as e.g. JPEG or TIF.


    /Roland
     
    Roland Karlsson, Oct 18, 2004
    #5
  6. jerryz

    chidalgo Guest

    Larry R Harrison Jr escribio:

    > To me there is no advantage to shooting RAW unless it's a "questionable"
    > situation where you don't know if the photo is going to turn out as you want
    > it to AND shooting RAW will improve your chances.


    JPEG introduces artifacts, even on low levels of compression (JPEG
    "High" in some cameras). JPEG is a lossy format, ie, you lost some of
    the photo information.

    RAW is a lossless format, ie, 0% of the origial data of the photo is
    losted. Is the equivalent of a digital negative (or digital slide :) ).
    You also can use TIFF, wich if a lossless format too, but many cameras
    only support JPEG.

    Color Correction in RAW mode is trivial, in JPEG is a little more
    tricky (easy too, but requires more steps; in RAW mode, CC is a one-step
    solution).

    I always shoot RAW :)

    --
    chidalgo
     
    chidalgo, Oct 19, 2004
    #6
  7. jerryz

    Hunt Guest

    In article <>, says...
    >
    >Chidalgo basically got it right. My thoughts.
    >
    >RAW is as RAW sounds; it's raw. When a digital camera takes a picture, it
    >takes the data and typically processes it to produce a final product, a
    >JPEG. Parameters such as level of sharpening to apply, saturation, contrast,
    >compression etc are factored in, making the JPEG that comes out something of
    >a "final" product.
    >
    >With RAW, you get the picture data WITHOUT the processing, and you have to
    >process it on your computer to produce a JPEG. Basically a RAW image cannot
    >be used for normal image viewing; that is, you can't take a RAW and print it
    >straight-up, or give it to a lab for printing, or do JPEG edits to it. You
    >have to create a JPEG of it first.


    Close, but you are not limited to JPEG. While I don't know all the various RAW
    image processing software, Photoshop will allow you to open your RAW image and
    then Save_As dozens of formats - JPG is only one possible solution and should
    be considered as a final product, where no editing is going to happen. In PS,
    for instance, I always Save_As PSD, then convert the final to whatever format
    that my client needs.

    >
    >Typically, besides RAWs taking up much more space on the card, they also
    >typically slow down the camera. The D70 is a very swift camera (especially
    >for it to be an entry-level model vs a "high-speed" model like the D2H or
    >Canon Mark II series models) so that isn't as much of an issue. With a
    >camera like my 5700, it's a major issue. Note: the D70 also offers a
    >"RAW+JPEG" mode which allows you to capture a JPEG with a RAW, but it's
    >fixed as a "Basic" JPEG which isn't the best quality. So I would say the
    >D70's (RAW+JPEG) mode is of no value unless you want a JPEG for a reference.


    Compared to JPG, but less room than TIFF, if one's cameral allows that format.

    >
    >To me there is no advantage to shooting RAW unless it's a "questionable"
    >situation where you don't know if the photo is going to turn out as you want
    >it to AND shooting RAW will improve your chances. IE, RAW won't fix an
    >out-of-focus photo, or one that's blurry because you shot at too slow a
    >shutter speed, or the background is blurry and you wanted it sharp. Also
    >some situations are "straight up" and aren't condusive to having much of
    >advantage with them being shot in RAW for those types of tweaks; typical
    >JPEG tweaks are the answer for any jazzing up you want to do. With those you
    >shoot JPEG.


    RAW gives the greatest latitude of processing, regardless of whether the image
    is good, or bad. You are correct, that it will not save a really bad image,
    but it can make a great one perfect.

    >
    >On the other hand, if you're shooting a tricky lighting situation where it's
    >a choice between exposing for the shadows and blowing out the highlights or
    >exposing for the highlights with everything else too dark, or if you think
    >maybe the saturation or sharpness etc would look better tweaked from its
    >normal settings and you want to see what works best and have the flexibility
    >to change them later on the computer (a scenario I have happen with macros
    >of flowers where I think I may want to increase saturation so the flowers
    >look more "colorful" but I'm experimenting to see yes/no to that), and you
    >have the room on your card to do it.
    >
    >I shoot RAW some, and I don't pretend to understand all the different
    >parameters per se the way a professional would, but that's how I understand
    >them to be.
    >
    >LRH


    Hunt
     
    Hunt, Oct 19, 2004
    #7
  8. "jerryz" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Can someone please explain (raw mode) for me. I'm a novice and have a new
    > Nikon D70. And should i even be using that mode as a novice?


    Raw mode means the camera records the actual pixels that it saw, with no
    compression, sharpening, or smoothing.

    Use raw mode if:
    (1) your picture is somewhat unusual, such as a very long exposure at night,
    so that normal types of processing would not apply to it;
    (2) you are planning to do manually, in Photoshop, a lot of things that
    would otherwise be done automatically;
    (3) you have lots of file space to spare.

    The D70 does not actually have a truly raw mode, according to the
    astrophotography experts whose reviews I've been reading. It has a "raw"
    mode that is nearly raw but includes a little median filtering to reduce
    noise speckles.

    Normally, when not in raw mode, the camera does the following:
    - Compresses the file into JPG format, which saves a lot of space but causes
    a very slight loss of fine detail;
    - Does a bit of sharpening and maybe some speckle removal.

    Incidentally, as you realized but others do not, "raw" is not an
    abbreviation and is not properly written RAW or R.A.W. It's just the usual
    word for uncooked (unprocessed).
     
    Michael A. Covington, Oct 19, 2004
    #8
  9. I wanted to add something. Until a month ago if you shot RAW (and I
    encourage everyone to do so) you had a lot off large files taking up your
    hard drive and CDs all over the place. Adobe has a free program that takes
    RAW files which all have different software and makes them into a digital
    negative. This file is both smaller than a RAW file, and is not dependant on
    any proprietary software. I have found that I can draw the files straight
    off my chip and into a DNG program. From there they act just like any other
    RAW file. I think I am going to suggest that photos brought in to where I
    work (a magazine) be brought in as DNG from now on where possible.
     
    Gene Palmiter, Oct 20, 2004
    #9
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. =?Utf-8?B?d2F5bmVyMTIzMTIz?=

    wireless novice need help

    =?Utf-8?B?d2F5bmVyMTIzMTIz?=, Nov 3, 2004, in forum: Wireless Networking
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    496
  2. =?Utf-8?B?Umljaw==?=

    O.K. novice at work here!! Please advise..

    =?Utf-8?B?Umljaw==?=, Dec 23, 2004, in forum: Wireless Networking
    Replies:
    8
    Views:
    595
    Carey Holzman
    Dec 24, 2004
  3. MAG7577

    Novice needs help! Connection Problem

    MAG7577, Dec 30, 2004, in forum: Wireless Networking
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    460
    mikeFNB
    Jan 7, 2005
  4. MAG7577

    Novice needs help! Connection Problem

    MAG7577, Dec 30, 2004, in forum: Wireless Networking
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    452
    mikeFNB
    Jan 7, 2005
  5. =?Utf-8?B?Sm9yZw==?=

    WLAN novice with connection problem

    =?Utf-8?B?Sm9yZw==?=, Jun 7, 2005, in forum: Wireless Networking
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    571
Loading...

Share This Page