Notebook Repair

Discussion in 'A+ Certification' started by techshare, Jan 5, 2004.

  1. techshare

    techshare Guest

    Does anyone in this group have significant experience with (multiple brand)
    notebook repair? I am beginning to think this is no longer a profitable type
    of repair. Even with a well equipped shop, and experienced technicians ...
    how difficult is it to fix the myriad of hardware problems people can cause
    with notebooks? Most of the parts are proprietary. I couple all this with
    the fact that it seems (not surprisingly) that people that call me have
    already called others and are looking for a "deal" on the notebook repair.
    I'm thinking the next time someone calls me saying "Yeah, I spilled coffee
    all over my new Dell note ... so how much is it gonna cost to fix it?!" I'll
    say "Call someone else". TIA for any response from someone with the
    experience noted above. Please no flames and no replies from idiots with no
    experience who like to boast their opinions.
    techshare, Jan 5, 2004
    #1
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  2. techshare

    Ghost Guest

    In article <>, "techshare"
    <> wrote:

    > Does anyone in this group have significant experience with (multiple brand)
    > notebook repair? I am beginning to think this is no longer a profitable type
    > of repair. Even with a well equipped shop, and experienced technicians ...
    > how difficult is it to fix the myriad of hardware problems people can cause
    > with notebooks? Most of the parts are proprietary. I couple all this with
    > the fact that it seems (not surprisingly) that people that call me have
    > already called others and are looking for a "deal" on the notebook repair.
    > I'm thinking the next time someone calls me saying "Yeah, I spilled coffee
    > all over my new Dell note ... so how much is it gonna cost to fix it?!" I'll
    > say "Call someone else". TIA for any response from someone with the
    > experience noted above. Please no flames and no replies from idiots with no
    > experience who like to boast their opinions.




    I work on tons of laptops... In fact, i am the only shop in the county
    that works on laptops regularly. The other shops tend not to touch them
    since they are all so much different from each other and much more
    complicated than a desktop PC.

    I still see it as at least partially profitable for the moment because
    they are so expensive to replace. Depending on what is wrong with them,
    of course. If it is a mobo or a display, most of the time they are
    cheaper to replace the laptop than repair them. But, other than that,
    there is still some mone to be made on repairing laptops.
    Ghost, Jan 5, 2004
    #2
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  3. techshare

    techshare Guest

    Thanks for the reply , Ghost.

    I didn't realize you were also an electronics technician. I am assuming you
    have a lot of electronic experience since I can't imagine how I could make
    good time repairing say ... a damaged keyboard on a notebook (OK, maybe it's
    just diagnose KBD bad, and order replacement ... but I would think ordering
    these proprietary parts for notebooks would be a real pain in the *ss ...
    esp if they are older units). Another case I get often (at least according
    to the customer over the phone) is a completely "dead" notebook ... no
    lights ... or maybe a power light and that's it. TIA for any general tips on
    how you go about fixing these things in a systematic way.
    "Ghost" <> wrote in message
    news:user-0501041833560001@1.0.0.101...
    > In article <>, "techshare"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > > Does anyone in this group have significant experience with (multiple

    brand)
    > > notebook repair? I am beginning to think this is no longer a profitable

    type
    > > of repair. Even with a well equipped shop, and experienced technicians

    ....
    > > how difficult is it to fix the myriad of hardware problems people can

    cause
    > > with notebooks? Most of the parts are proprietary. I couple all this

    with
    > > the fact that it seems (not surprisingly) that people that call me have
    > > already called others and are looking for a "deal" on the notebook

    repair.
    > > I'm thinking the next time someone calls me saying "Yeah, I spilled

    coffee
    > > all over my new Dell note ... so how much is it gonna cost to fix it?!"

    I'll
    > > say "Call someone else". TIA for any response from someone with the
    > > experience noted above. Please no flames and no replies from idiots with

    no
    > > experience who like to boast their opinions.

    >
    >
    >
    > I work on tons of laptops... In fact, i am the only shop in the county
    > that works on laptops regularly. The other shops tend not to touch them
    > since they are all so much different from each other and much more
    > complicated than a desktop PC.
    >
    > I still see it as at least partially profitable for the moment because
    > they are so expensive to replace. Depending on what is wrong with them,
    > of course. If it is a mobo or a display, most of the time they are
    > cheaper to replace the laptop than repair them. But, other than that,
    > there is still some mone to be made on repairing laptops.
    techshare, Jan 6, 2004
    #3
  4. techshare

    Ghost Guest

    Your smartassed comments aside techshare, yes, most of the parts are
    proprietary.

    However, there are many resources to get the parts as you need them- and
    not from the tier one manufacturer.

    Using your example of the keyboard, I get most replacement keybords for 20
    to 30 bucks. Sometimes more, sometimes less. 1 hour labor plus the part
    (with a markup, of course). Whats wrong with that? There's profit in
    them thar hills!

    And yes, I get the same thing at times- a dead notebook. If the AC
    adapter is good, and the connector port is not broken (or a cold solder
    joint) from the mobo, then chances are the laptop is truly dead and at
    this point not worth fixing.

    However, ya never know what kind of good parts you can scrounge from them
    if the customer relinquishes ownership (they usually do). HDD, RAM, FDD,
    CD, displays, keyboards, etc. Also, I remove the CPU if it is removable.
    I also remove (ya have to know how to solder) and save for future use the
    AC port. They break an awful lot and believe it or not, the wholesale
    price of that stupid little adapter port is an average of 20-30 bucks a
    piece!

    I label each part as to what make and model the part came from (assuming
    it tests good), and box it up. It is really kewl when a laptop comes in
    for repair that you have a part for!




    In article <>, "techshare"
    <> wrote:

    > Thanks for the reply , Ghost.
    >
    > I didn't realize you were also an electronics technician. I am assuming you
    > have a lot of electronic experience since I can't imagine how I could make
    > good time repairing say ... a damaged keyboard on a notebook (OK, maybe it's
    > just diagnose KBD bad, and order replacement ... but I would think ordering
    > these proprietary parts for notebooks would be a real pain in the *ss ...
    > esp if they are older units). Another case I get often (at least according
    > to the customer over the phone) is a completely "dead" notebook ... no
    > lights ... or maybe a power light and that's it. TIA for any general tips on
    > how you go about fixing these things in a systematic way.
    > "Ghost" <> wrote in message
    > news:user-0501041833560001@1.0.0.101...
    > > In article <>, "techshare"
    > > <> wrote:
    > >
    > > > Does anyone in this group have significant experience with (multiple

    > brand)
    > > > notebook repair? I am beginning to think this is no longer a profitable

    > type
    > > > of repair. Even with a well equipped shop, and experienced technicians

    > ...
    > > > how difficult is it to fix the myriad of hardware problems people can

    > cause
    > > > with notebooks? Most of the parts are proprietary. I couple all this

    > with
    > > > the fact that it seems (not surprisingly) that people that call me have
    > > > already called others and are looking for a "deal" on the notebook

    > repair.
    > > > I'm thinking the next time someone calls me saying "Yeah, I spilled

    > coffee
    > > > all over my new Dell note ... so how much is it gonna cost to fix it?!"

    > I'll
    > > > say "Call someone else". TIA for any response from someone with the
    > > > experience noted above. Please no flames and no replies from idiots with

    > no
    > > > experience who like to boast their opinions.

    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > I work on tons of laptops... In fact, i am the only shop in the county
    > > that works on laptops regularly. The other shops tend not to touch them
    > > since they are all so much different from each other and much more
    > > complicated than a desktop PC.
    > >
    > > I still see it as at least partially profitable for the moment because
    > > they are so expensive to replace. Depending on what is wrong with them,
    > > of course. If it is a mobo or a display, most of the time they are
    > > cheaper to replace the laptop than repair them. But, other than that,
    > > there is still some mone to be made on repairing laptops.
    Ghost, Jan 7, 2004
    #4
  5. techshare

    RussS Guest

    Damn Ghost - a man after my own heart. I've got mountains of laptop stuff
    laying around as I just never know what I will need in the future. My
    latest is one that they forgot to remove the network cable and broke the
    internal connector - can't buy them for love nor money so it is good that I
    keep all that stuff.
    RussS, Jan 7, 2004
    #5
  6. techshare

    Ghost Guest

    In article <3SIKb.4002$>, "RussS"
    <> wrote:

    > Damn Ghost - a man after my own heart. I've got mountains of laptop stuff
    > laying around as I just never know what I will need in the future. My
    > latest is one that they forgot to remove the network cable and broke the
    > internal connector - can't buy them for love nor money so it is good that I
    > keep all that stuff.




    half a penny worth of solder... and ya gots a repair made!!! lol The part
    was free, and the labor is billable!!! lol
    Ghost, Jan 7, 2004
    #6
  7. techshare

    Gary Guest

    On Wed, 07 Jan 2004 00:29:16 GMT, (Ghost) wrote:

    >However, there are many resources to get the parts as you need them- and
    >not from the tier one manufacturer.
    >


    Ghost would you be willing to share the sources of your notebook parts
    from other then tier one manufacturers?
    Gary, Jan 7, 2004
    #7
  8. techshare

    Ghost Guest

    In article <>, Gary
    <> wrote:

    > On Wed, 07 Jan 2004 00:29:16 GMT, (Ghost) wrote:
    >
    > >However, there are many resources to get the parts as you need them- and
    > >not from the tier one manufacturer.
    > >

    >
    > Ghost would you be willing to share the sources of your notebook parts
    > from other then tier one manufacturers?




    Check the internet.. there are plenty of sources...

    One I use alot is laptopparts.com Ask for Joe Quiroz at 1(888)-LAPTOPS
    (527-8677).

    Tell him A+ Computer Service, Inc from Florida sent you...
    Ghost, Jan 7, 2004
    #8
  9. techshare

    Gary Guest


    >> Ghost would you be willing to share the sources of your notebook parts
    >> from other then tier one manufacturers?

    >
    >
    >
    >Check the internet.. there are plenty of sources...
    >
    >One I use alot is laptopparts.com Ask for Joe Quiroz at 1(888)-LAPTOPS
    >(527-8677).
    >
    >Tell him A+ Computer Service, Inc from Florida sent you...


    Thanks for the info.
    Gary, Jan 7, 2004
    #9
  10. techshare

    dstvns Guest

    On Wed, 07 Jan 2004 00:29:16 GMT, (Ghost) wrote:

    >I also remove (ya have to know how to solder) and save for future use the
    >AC port. They break an awful lot and believe it or not, the wholesale
    >price of that stupid little adapter port is an average of 20-30 bucks a
    >piece!


    There's nothing like replacing a failed circuit on a circuit board and
    getting a machine running again :) I had an old colecovision game
    system with a failed joystick chip on the PCB (someone probably
    touched the joystick prongs and zapped the chip with ESD). I bought
    an octal decoder chip for $3, drilled out the old one, inserted the
    new. Took a little finesse with solder, but it worked !!! :) Also
    did this to loose wires in the joystick...a couple "luke-warm" solders
    and its running again. Fun stuff...usually, heheh

    Dan
    dstvns, Jan 8, 2004
    #10
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