Not bragging

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by tony cooper, May 27, 2008.

  1. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    This is not a photograph that I'm bragging about as an example of fine
    photography, but the subject is something I've never seen before: a
    Sandhill Crane sitting down.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/tony213/2528133523/

    I came out of the barber shop today and saw this crane sitting in the
    grass. All I had with me was my point & shoot, and it doesn't have a
    viewfinder. The noon sun completely obscured the screen, so I wasn't
    even sure I had the crane in frame. I couldn't get the bird out of
    the shadow because that would make the bird stand up.

    The crane's "knees" bend the opposite way of a human's. You can see
    this in the shot of a pair walking down the street in a shot that's
    also at this link that I took from my car window with the same camera
    a few days before.

    These 5 foot tall birds are so common where I live that I didn't
    bother going home for my Nikon D40. I live on a golf course, and
    there are several pair of Sandhills around every day.


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
    tony cooper, May 27, 2008
    #1
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  2. tony cooper

    Dudley Hanks Guest

    "tony cooper" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > This is not a photograph that I'm bragging about as an example of fine
    > photography, but the subject is something I've never seen before: a
    > Sandhill Crane sitting down.
    >
    > http://www.flickr.com/photos/tony213/2528133523/
    >
    > I came out of the barber shop today and saw this crane sitting in the
    > grass. All I had with me was my point & shoot, and it doesn't have a
    > viewfinder. The noon sun completely obscured the screen, so I wasn't
    > even sure I had the crane in frame.



    I guess I'm not the only one shooting blind...

    Great job, Tony.

    Take Care,
    Dudley
    Dudley Hanks, May 27, 2008
    #2
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  3. tony cooper

    Lee K Guest

    "tony cooper" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    >
    > The crane's "knees" bend the opposite way of a human's.


    I used to get a rise out of my kids when I asked them what a chair would
    look like if our knees bent the 'other' way.
    Lee K, May 28, 2008
    #3
  4. tony cooper

    ASAAR Guest

    On Tue, 27 May 2008 15:12:59 -0400, tony cooper wrote:

    > These 5 foot tall birds are so common where I live that I didn't
    > bother going home for my Nikon D40. I live on a golf course, and
    > there are several pair of Sandhills around every day.


    A week ago I trekked to a pair of local golf courses (on a cold
    and rainy day) that I hadn't been to in about 40 years. Back then
    the only big flying things of note were the humongous striped
    mosquitoes. A local employee told us that they were finally
    eradicated about two years ago. Nothing like Sandhills here, just
    some grouse, a few skunks, and occasionally a rare fox or raccoon.

    After wandering for about an hour on several holes on the first
    course the weather got to us, but just before getting in the car to
    leave, decided to check out Split Rock, (the other golf course,
    named for Ann Hutchinson's infamous Split Rock). It may no longer
    have had the evil mosquitoes, but in their place were turkeys - lots
    of 'em, and pretty big too, probably close to 3 feet tall. I don't
    know if that's considered to be large in other parts of the country,
    but for NYC, that's BIG! With the sporadic rain, I decided not to
    bring my D50, but did get a couple of shots from a Canon S3 that
    easily fit in my jacket's pocket. I'll go back in a few months
    (after I get a new WA lens for the D50) to snap some shots of the
    golf courses, but not until B&H notifies me that Tokina's new
    11-16mm lenses have arrived.
    ASAAR, May 28, 2008
    #4
  5. tony cooper wrote:

    > This is not a photograph that I'm bragging about as an example of fine
    > photography, but the subject is something I've never seen before: a
    > Sandhill Crane sitting down.
    >
    > http://www.flickr.com/photos/tony213/2528133523/
    >
    > I came out of the barber shop today and saw this crane sitting in the
    > grass. All I had with me was my point & shoot, and it doesn't have a
    > viewfinder. The noon sun completely obscured the screen, so I wasn't
    > even sure I had the crane in frame. I couldn't get the bird out of
    > the shadow because that would make the bird stand up.
    >
    > The crane's "knees" bend the opposite way of a human's.


    Now I'm scratching my head and wondering if any bird knees *do* bend the
    way ours do. The more I think about it, the more I want to say "no". But
    I've been fooled before. :)

    This might be new here; I got it last week out in the desert. Low on art;
    high on fun.

    http://pbase.com/blinkytheshark/image/97734982.jpg


    --
    Blinky
    Killing all posts from Google Groups
    The Usenet Improvement Project --> http://improve-usenet.org
    Found 5/08: a free GG-blocking news *feed* --> http://usenet4all.se
    Blinky the Shark, May 28, 2008
    #5
  6. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    On Tue, 27 May 2008 20:10:43 -0400, ASAAR <> wrote:

    > A week ago I trekked to a pair of local golf courses (on a cold
    >and rainy day) that I hadn't been to in about 40 years. Back then
    >the only big flying things of note were the humongous striped
    >mosquitoes. A local employee told us that they were finally
    >eradicated about two years ago. Nothing like Sandhills here, just
    >some grouse, a few skunks, and occasionally a rare fox or raccoon.


    On our golf course, there's grousing, some players skunking other
    players with $10 Nassau, and some foxy lady golfers. What is easiest
    to spot is the Plaid Hacker and the Puffbelly Bogeymaker. Very rarely
    an Eagle, and not enough Birdies. Plenty of Mulligans.

    > After wandering for about an hour on several holes on the first
    >course the weather got to us, but just before getting in the car to
    >leave, decided to check out Split Rock, (the other golf course,
    >named for Ann Hutchinson's infamous Split Rock). It may no longer
    >have had the evil mosquitoes, but in their place were turkeys - lots
    >of 'em, and pretty big too, probably close to 3 feet tall.


    I saw two wild turkeys Saturday, but they were too far away to catch
    with the Nikon 200mm. These were females and not all that large.

    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
    tony cooper, May 28, 2008
    #6
  7. tony cooper

    ASAAR Guest

    On Tue, 27 May 2008 23:02:29 -0400, tony cooper wrote:

    >> A week ago I trekked to a pair of local golf courses (on a cold
    >> and rainy day) that I hadn't been to in about 40 years. Back then
    >> the only big flying things of note were the humongous striped
    >> mosquitoes. A local employee told us that they were finally
    >> eradicated about two years ago. Nothing like Sandhills here, just
    >> some grouse, a few skunks, and occasionally a rare fox or raccoon.

    >
    > On our golf course, there's grousing, some players skunking other
    > players with $10 Nassau, and some foxy lady golfers. What is easiest
    > to spot is the Plaid Hacker and the Puffbelly Bogeymaker. Very rarely
    > an Eagle, and not enough Birdies. Plenty of Mulligans.


    Very nice! We talked about Mulligans too, meeting an Irish
    twosome on the 10th hole that wouldn't let a little drizzle get in
    the way of a round of golf. It reminded me of when I played the same
    course years ago when the fairways were still covered with snow. :)
    ASAAR, May 28, 2008
    #7
  8. savvo wrote:

    > On 2008-05-28, Blinky the Shark <> wrote:
    >> tony cooper wrote:
    >>>
    >>> The crane's "knees" bend the opposite way of a human's.

    >>
    >> Now I'm scratching my head and wondering if any bird knees *do* bend the
    >> way ours do. The more I think about it, the more I want to say "no". But
    >> I've been fooled before. :)

    >
    > I suspect Tony put the quotes on 'knees' because birds' "knees" are
    > actually ankles. So they bend the same way as everyone else.


    Hmmmm. I never thought about that. But I see what you mean.


    --
    Blinky
    Killing all posts from Google Groups
    The Usenet Improvement Project --> http://improve-usenet.org
    Found 5/08: a free GG-blocking news *feed* --> http://usenet4all.se
    Blinky the Shark, May 28, 2008
    #8
  9. <snip>
    >>
    >> The crane's "knees" bend the opposite way of a human's.

    >

    <snip>

    > Now I'm scratching my head and wondering if any bird knees *do* bend the
    > way ours do. The more I think about it, the more I want to say "no". But
    > I've been fooled before. :)
    >


    The joint that we see as the knee is actually the bird's equivalent of
    our ankle. In this diagram
    http://www.paulnoll.com/Oregon/Birds/Avian-Skeleton.html
    you can see that the bird's knee is hidden by its plumage: its legs are
    held this way for some reason to do with centre of gravity that is
    beyond my competence to explain :)

    Geoff
    Geoff Realname, May 28, 2008
    #9
  10. Geoff Realname wrote:

    > <snip>
    >>>
    >>> The crane's "knees" bend the opposite way of a human's.

    >>

    > <snip>
    >
    >> Now I'm scratching my head and wondering if any bird knees *do* bend the
    >> way ours do. The more I think about it, the more I want to say "no". But
    >> I've been fooled before. :)
    >>

    >
    > The joint that we see as the knee is actually the bird's equivalent of
    > our ankle. In this diagram
    > http://www.paulnoll.com/Oregon/Birds/Avian-Skeleton.html
    > you can see that the bird's knee is hidden by its plumage: its legs are
    > held this way for some reason to do with centre of gravity that is
    > beyond my competence to explain :)


    Righto. Nice illustration. It helps that many of the bone names are the
    same as ours. (My human half wrote that. <g>)


    --
    Blinky
    Killing all posts from Google Groups
    The Usenet Improvement Project --> http://improve-usenet.org
    Found 5/08: a free GG-blocking news *feed* --> http://usenet4all.se
    Blinky the Shark, May 28, 2008
    #10
  11. ASAAR <> wrote in news:r17p34525gm3485dar0v4lm0ejpi2v95r8@
    4ax.com:

    > A week ago I trekked to a pair of local golf courses (on a cold
    > and rainy day) that I hadn't been to in about 40 years. Back then
    > the only big flying things of note were the humongous striped
    > mosquitoes. A local employee told us that they were finally
    > eradicated about two years ago. Nothing like Sandhills here, just
    > some grouse, a few skunks, and occasionally a rare fox or raccoon.
    >
    > After wandering for about an hour on several holes on the first
    > course the weather got to us, but just before getting in the car to
    > leave, decided to check out Split Rock, (the other golf course,
    > named for Ann Hutchinson's infamous Split Rock).


    Are you saying that there are Grouse in Pelham Bay Park now?

    I've seen lots of turkeys and pheasants, (and some deer, mostly dead and
    tracks) but not grouse.

    The PBP landfill area is an excellent place to see kestrels, peregrines,
    harriers, red-tails, sharp-shinned, and cooper's hawks, as well as the
    kingfishers and herons and egrets, in season. The lagoon by the Orchard
    Beach parking lot can sometimes have scores of herons and egrets at low
    tide.

    --
    John Sheehy
    John P Sheehy, Jun 4, 2008
    #11
  12. ASAAR <> wrote in news:r17p34525gm3485dar0v4lm0ejpi2v95r8@
    4ax.com:

    > A week ago I trekked to a pair of local golf courses (on a cold
    > and rainy day) that I hadn't been to in about 40 years. Back then
    > the only big flying things of note were the humongous striped
    > mosquitoes. A local employee told us that they were finally
    > eradicated about two years ago. Nothing like Sandhills here, just
    > some grouse, a few skunks, and occasionally a rare fox or raccoon.


    Actually, now that I thing of it, there have been rare Sandhill Crane
    visits to Pelham Bay Park in the past.

    --
    John Sheehy
    John P Sheehy, Jun 4, 2008
    #12
  13. tony cooper

    ASAAR Guest

    On Wed, 04 Jun 2008 01:22:31 GMT, John P Sheehy wrote:

    >> . . . A local employee told us that they were finally
    >> eradicated about two years ago. Nothing like Sandhills here, just
    >> some grouse, a few skunks, and occasionally a rare fox or raccoon.
    >>
    >> After wandering for about an hour on several holes on the first
    >> course the weather got to us, but just before getting in the car to
    >> leave, decided to check out Split Rock, (the other golf course,
    >> named for Ann Hutchinson's infamous Split Rock).

    >
    > Are you saying that there are Grouse in Pelham Bay Park now?


    No. I was aware of one mistake almost immediately after typing
    it. I was thinking of the quail that were plentiful on the golf
    courses when I played there over 40 years ago, but typed grouse
    instead. The only critters I saw last month were the strangely tame
    turkeys wandering about Split Rock. The quail and skunks were both
    frequently seen on the golf courses - again, over 40 years ago.
    Raccoons weren't seen as often, but they, as well as skunks are
    still occasionally found wandering further south through Bronx
    neighborhoods. Foxes are rare, and I haven't personally seen any in
    the area, but according to newspaper accounts they occasionally
    appear.


    > The PBP landfill area is an excellent place to see kestrels, peregrines,
    > harriers, red-tails, sharp-shinned, and cooper's hawks, as well as the
    > kingfishers and herons and egrets, in season. The lagoon by the Orchard
    > Beach parking lot can sometimes have scores of herons and egrets at low
    > tide.


    I'll have to keep an eye out for them if I'm ever around there. I
    used to occasionally visit with a friend near St. Raymond's Cemetery
    and Ferry Point Park (also over 40 years ago), and all I recall
    seeing were huge numbers of seagulls flying over the landfill.
    ASAAR, Jun 4, 2008
    #13
  14. ASAAR <> wrote in
    news::


    > No. I was aware of one mistake almost immediately after typing
    > it. I was thinking of the quail that were plentiful on the golf
    > courses when I played there over 40 years ago, but typed grouse
    > instead.


    Probably Northern Bobwhites, then. I don't think they've been seen
    around there lately; not since I've been paying attention. One rare
    animal that has survived there is the mink. I've read of mink in PBP,
    and half-believed it, but I found a road-killed one a couple of years ago
    on the road to the Hutchinson River Parkway.


    >> The PBP landfill area is an excellent place to see kestrels,
    >> peregrines, harriers, red-tails, sharp-shinned, and cooper's hawks,
    >> as well as the kingfishers and herons and egrets, in season. The
    >> lagoon by the Orchard Beach parking lot can sometimes have scores of
    >> herons and egrets at low tide.


    > I'll have to keep an eye out for them if I'm ever around there. I
    > used to occasionally visit with a friend near St. Raymond's Cemetery
    > and Ferry Point Park (also over 40 years ago), and all I recall
    > seeing were huge numbers of seagulls flying over the landfill.


    Well, the landfill was just raw garbage 40 years ago. It's a mound now
    where tall grasses grow.

    --
    John Sheehy
    John P Sheehy, Jun 5, 2008
    #14
  15. tony cooper

    Guest

    On Thu, 5 Jun 2008 16:21:06 -0400, "rwalker" <>
    wrote:

    >
    >"savvo" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >
    >snip
    >
    >>
    >> You're welcome to come over to England and take as many mink as you can
    >> carry back to North America. And if you ever find yourselves short of
    >> grey squirrels....
    >>
    >> --

    >
    >
    >Think of the grey squirrels as our thanks for the starlings. :)
    >

    I'm not so sure that the Starlings croossed the pond in a westerly
    direction, but others will no doubt correct me on that.

    Starlings are a noisy crowd, but they do have a use: The dig deeply
    in the lawn to root out Leatherjacjets, whic (if they survive) turn
    into Crane Flies. The lawn aeration is not a bad thing.

    Lastly

    <Tasteless Mode>

    Have you ever noticed that a bad lower gastric experience sounds like
    a flock of Starlings leaving the roost?

    </Tasteless Mode>
    , Jun 5, 2008
    #15
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